For a better experience, click the Compatibility Mode icon above to turn off Compatibility Mode, which is only for viewing older websites.

Faculty Experts

John Kounios, PhD

Professor, Department of Psychology

College of Arts and Sciences

Expertise:

psychology

Contact:

jk342@drexel.edu

215.553.7105

John Kounios is a professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences who studies cognitive neuroscience. The main focus of his research is the neural basis of creativity, insight and problem solving. He specializes in high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) recording of brain activity and other behavioral neuroimaging methods, such as fMRI.

In his book, “The Eureka Factor,” Kounios and his co-author explore how “aha” moments arise, when we need them and what the scientific research says about stimulating more of them. The authors discuss how various conditions affect the likelihood of your having a sudden creative insight, when methodical thought is more helpful and how the brain’s right hemisphere contributes to creative thought.

More information about Kounios.

For news media inquiries, contact Annie Korp at amk522@drexel.edu or 215.571.4244.

In the News

  • This is Your Brain During a Pandemic

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in an April 17 episode of NPR “The Pulse” about creativity and production during self-isolation in the pandemic. The story ran on WHYY-RadioKERA-FM (Dallas, Texas), WYPR-FM (Baltimore, Maryland), WGBH-FM (Boston, Massachusetts) and other NPR stations nationwide. Kounios was also quoted in April 18 Ladders and Big Think articles about recently published research on what part of the brain controls creativity and the evolutionary development of creativity.

  • Philadelphia Engineer Creates Backup Ventilators for Coronavirus Pandemic

    Marek Swoboda, PhD, an assistant teaching professor in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, was featured in an April 17 episode of WHYY-Radio's “The Pulse” about his efforts to lead a team that is creating back-up ventilators for hospitals during the coronavirus pandemic. John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was also interviewed in the piece about the role of creative problem-solving during the pandemic.

  • Surprising Study Finds That Creativity Is Not Actually Right Brain—It Is Left Brain

    Recently published research led by John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was mentioned in a April 1 Fast Company article about the study contradicting popular notions about which side of the brain controls creativity. According to Kounios’ study, creative brain activity shifts sides with the level of experience a person has at the creative activity at hand, such as jazz guitarists playing improvisations. 

  • Gaming’s Pleasure Principle: How Virtual Worlds Make Our Creative Brains Come AliveĀ­

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a Nov. 15 Electronic Games Monthly article about video games’ effect on creativity and pleasure in a player’s brain.

  • New Insights on Insight in the Brain

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was featured in a July 3 National Science Foundation blog post about his research using advance imaging technology to study how insight arises in the brain.

  • In Search of Epiphanies

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was featured in an April 9 BBC Radio 4 documentary about epiphanies and “Aha!” moments.

  • How Laughter Makes You Work Better

    Research by John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, which found that laughter can help people solve tricky logic puzzles, was mentioned in an April 4 BBC “Capital” article.

     

  • Let’s Make Room for Eureka Moments

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in an August Headspace blog post about why we get some of our best ideas in the shower. He was also mentioned in a July 28 HuffPost story about making time for eureka moments.

  • Eureka? Yes, Eureka!

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, authored a June 10 New York Times opinion piece refuting a claim that Mark Zuckerberg made in his commencement address at Harvard. Zuckerberg suggested that that "the idea of a single eureka moment" is "a dangerous lie."

  • The Power of the Aha! Moment

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was featured in an article in the December 2016 issue of Prevention magazine about his book “The Eureka Factor” and the forces that spark an “Aha” moment.

  • It’s Not Trivial … Knowing Obscure Facts Is Good for Our Mental Health

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a Nov. 15 Healthline story about how trivia games can benefit mental health.

  • I Knew It! The DOOR CLOSE Button Does Nothing.

    An Oct. 27 New York Times story that quoted John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, about the illusion of perceived control was picked up by Big Think on Nov. 2.

  • The Case for Being Messy

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was mentioned in an Oct. 6 TIME story about the advantages of distractibility.

  • Can We All Become Geniuses?

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was featured on a Sept. 20 episode of the Science Channel's "Through the Wormhole" about the brain and genius. 

  • Infrequently Asked Questions: Why Do we Think so Well in the Shower?

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was interviewed in a Philly Voice story about why we think so well in the shower.

  • Eureka! A Flash of Insight Beats Mulling it Over

    John Kounios, PhD, professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in an April 27 Times (UK) story on the correctness of Aha! Moments.

  • There Are Two Types of Problem-Solvers: 'Insightfuls' and 'Analysts'

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, authored a post for the U.K. version of Wired on the two types of problem solvers: "insightfuls" and "analysts."

  • Why the Best Ideas Come To You In the Shower

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor and director of the Applied Cognitive and Brain Sciences PhD program in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a March 17 Men’s Health article about his study of insight vs. analytical thought. An article in Psychology Today March 18 also profiled the study and quoted him.

  • Drexel Study: Insight Yields Better Solutions Than Analytical Approach

    John Kounios, PhD, a professor and director of the Applied and Cognitive Brain Sciences PhD Program in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a March 12 Philly Voice story about his study assessing the correctness of insight.

Related Articles