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Faculty Experts

Yaghoob Farnam

Yaghoob Farnam, PhD

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering

College of Engineering

Farnam is an expert in the materials engineering of infrastructure such as buildings, roads, highways and airports. His research group focuses on creating better materials to build infrastructure — things like durable cement that can withstand chemical degradation from road salt, materials that help roads melt ice without putting harmful chemicals into the environment, or materials for construction inspired by nature. Farnam has commented on stories about how deicing procedures can damage and degrade roads and how to improve the durability of infrastructure.

 

He draws from a background in developing and studying advanced materials for civil engineering applications to guide his group’s research. In addition to creating new materials, Farnam’s group also tests and monitors existing infrastructure materials to understand how they degrade and how they can be improved.

 

For news media inquiries, contact Britt Faulstick at bef29@drexel.edu, 215.895.2617 (office) or 215-796-5161 (cell).

 

Related from the Drexel News Blog 

 

For more information about Farnam

In the News

  • Deicer Degradation: Not Possible Using Bacteria-Laden Concrete Cement

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, both assistant professors in the College of Engineering, were quoted in an April 10 Science Times story about their collaborative research with Caroline Schauer, PhD, a professor and associate dean in the College, that looked at how a special type of bacteria could be used to preserve concrete infrastructure from deterioration caused by road salt.

  • How Bacteria Could Make Our Infrastructure Stronger

    A column in The Conversation authored by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about his research with colleagues Christopher Sales, PhD, and Caroline Schauer, PhD, on using a special type of bacteria to prevent pothole formation, was picked up byFast Company on April 5.

  • Calcium-munching Bacteria Could Be a Secret Weapon Against Road Salt Eating Away at Concrete Roads and Bridges

    Research that looked at using a special type of bacteria to help prevent pothole formation caused by road salt, conducted by  Yaghoob Farnam, PhD Christopher Sales, PhD ; and  Caroline Schauer, PhD,  all from the College of Engineering, was featured in an April 4  Associated Press  story.

  • Can Bacteria Help us Prevent Salt Damage to Concrete Roads and Bridges?

    A column in The Conversation authored by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about his research with colleagues Christopher Sales, PhD, and Caroline Schauer, PhD, on using a special type of bacteria to prevent pothole formation, was picked up by a number of outlets across the country on April 4, including Public Radio International, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Bozeman Daily Chronicle (Bozeman, Montana).

  • Calcium-Munching Bacteria Could Be a Secret Weapon Against Road Salt Eating Away at Concrete Roads and Bridges

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, authored a piece for The Conversation on April 4 about his research with colleagues Caroline Schauer, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, also in the College, about using a special kind of bacterial to prevent road salt from forming potholes. The piece was picked up by WTOP-FM(Washington, D.C.) and The Register-Guard (Eugene, Oregon).

  • Bacteria May Be the Key to Stopping Potholes from Forming

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, assistant professors in the College of Engineering, were featured in a WCAU-TV (NBC-10) newscast on April 1 about their research on how a special type of bacteria can be used to prevent potholes from forming in roads.

  • Scientists Hope Bacteria Could be The Cure For Potholes

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, assistant professors in the College of Engineering, were featured in a Jan. 5 FoxNews.com story about their research on using a special type of bacteria to prevent road salt from creating potholes and weakening road surfaces. The story was also picked up by dozens of local affiliates across the country.

  • Hate Shoveling? This Pavement Melts Snow by Itself

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was featured in a Dec. 14 Philadelphia Inquirer story about his research on using paraffin oil to create concrete that can melt snow and ice.

  • Concrete Additive Proved to Melt Snow Without Deicing Salts 

    Research by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about adding paraffin to concrete to create roads that can melt themselves clear in the winter, was featured in the December edition of Civil Engineering magazine.

  • Winter Is Coming. What If Roads And Runways Could De-Ice Themselves?

    Research by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about making roads that can de-ice themselves, was featured on NPR’s “All Tech Considered” blog on Oct. 1. The story was picked up by a number of NPR affiliates across the country, including New Hampshire Public Radio, Texas Public Radio, Georgia Public Radio Network, Alabama Public Radio and WNYC-Radio (New York).

  • Adding Paraffin Oil to Concrete Can Create Roads That De-Ice Themselves

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Sept. 28 Equipment World story about his study that found adding paraffin oil to a road’s concrete mix could make roads that melt snow and ice.

  • Scientists Just Developed Snow-Melting Concrete

    Research by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about adding paraffin oil to road concrete to help it melt snow and ice, was featured in a Sept. 18 Forbesstory.

  • With Help From Drexel Prof, Snow-Melting Concrete May Someday Clear Wintry Roads

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was featured in a Sept. 16 WHYY/Newsworks.org story about his research on using paraffin oil to make roads that can melt off ice and snow.

  • Wax Could Help Roads De-Ice Themselves

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Sept. 13 UPI story about his research on adding paraffin oil to concrete as a way of making roads that can melt off ice and snow.

  • New Concrete Mixture Would Allow Roads to Resist Corrosion from Road Salt

    Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was featured in a May 29 Equipment World story about his research on concrete that is more resistant to degradation from road deicer.

Related Articles

  • concrete road

    Using Bacteria to Prevent Potholes Caused by Road Salt

    Special bacteria that help form limestone and marble could soon have a new job on a road crew. Recent research from Drexel University’s College of Engineering shows how the bacteria, called Sporosarcina pasteurii, can be used to prevent the road degradation caused by ice-melting salt.

  • road melting

    Wax On, Melt Off — Researchers Find Adding Paraffin to Concrete Can Help Roads Clear Themselves in The Winter

    Drexel University researchers have made a discovery that could help roads keep themselves free of ice and snow during winter storms. Their secret? — Adding a little paraffin wax to the road’s concrete mix.

  • road cracks

    A Recipe For Concrete That Can Withstand Road Salt Deterioration

    Road salt, used in copious helpings each winter to protect them from ice and preserve safe driving conditions, is slowly degrading the concrete they’re made of. Engineers have known for some time that calcium chloride salt, commonly used as deicer, reacts with the calcium hydroxide in concrete to form a chemical byproduct that causes roadways to crumble. A civil engineer from Drexel University is working on a new recipe for concrete, using cast-off products from furnaces, that can hold its own against the forces of chemical erosion.