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Faculty Experts

Amy L. Landers, JD

Professor of Law, Director of the Intellectual Property Law Program

Thomas R. Kline School of Law

Contact:

amy.l.landers@drexel.edu

215.571.4795

Landers is an accomplished legal scholar and practitioner, and an expert on patents and intellectual property law. She was previously distinguished professor of law and director of the Intellectual Property Law Concentration at the University of the Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law. Landers is the author of “Understanding Patent Law,” now in its second edition, and co-author of “Global Issues in Intellectual Property Law” and “Global Issues in Patent Law.” Her scholarship has appeared in varied publications, including Texas Law Review: See Also, George Mason Law Review and the Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

More information about Landers

For news media inquiries, contact Emily Storz at els332@drexel.edu, 215.895.2705 (office) or 609.351.3592 (cell). 

In the News

  • Investors Eye Patents After ‘Extraordinary’ Damage Awards Run

    Amy Landers, JD, a professor in the Kline School of Law, was quoted in a Nov. 6 Bloomberg Law article about a series of head-turning damages awards in patent infringement cases against companies like Cisco Systems Inc. and Apple Inc., which may spur additional investment in intellectual property portfolios.

  • Could the Phanatic Really Leave the Phillies Amid Copyright Dispute?

    An Aug. 13 Philadelphia Inquirer story, quoting Amy Landers, JD, a professor in the Kline School of Law, about the copyright battle involving the Phillie Phanatic mascot, was picked up by a number of outlets across the country, including the Allentown Morning Call.

  • U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Could be Economic Boon For Delaware

    Amy Landers, JD, a professor of law and director of the Intellectual Property Law program in the Kline School of Law, was quoted in two Delaware News Journal stories on May 26 and May 30 about a recent Supreme Court decision that could send hundreds of patent cases to Delaware and how the state might deal with the potential of a judicial shortage. 

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