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Campus & Community

Share Your Story of Remote Teaching at Drexel

September 29, 2020

For a course that was supposed to be taught in the Netherlands over the spring, LeBow College of Business clinical professor Dana D’Angelo arranged for a “goodie box” of Dutch food to be sent to students during a virtual group meal. Photo courtesy Dana D’Angelo.
For a course that was supposed to be taught in the Netherlands over the spring, LeBow College of Business clinical professor Dana D’Angelo arranged for a “goodie box” of Dutch food to be sent to students during a virtual group meal. Photo courtesy Dana D’Angelo.

Please visit the ‘Drexel’s Response to Coronavirus’ website for the latest public health advisories. 

How do you remotely teach a course that was supposed to be taught abroad? What about a community project-based learning class when students can no longer visit a site? And once you’ve translated your in-person course into a remote course — then what? How do you use (or even know where to find) Drexel tools to virtually record and edit video interviews or digitize board notes?

These questions, and many more, were being asked by Drexel University faculty in the spring, when the University quickly pivoted to remote learning. Drexel has now started its third consecutive term online, so you might have already figured out what has worked — and what didn’t — with your remote teaching so far, but maybe you need new ways to continue teaching classes already turned remote. Or, with the new academic year, perhaps you’re moving new courses online and want to try something different this time.  

That’s why Drexel’s Remote Teaching Task Force has been publishing stories written by Drexel faculty who wanted to share their experiences and offer advice. Those“Success Stories: Lessons Learned from Remote Teaching” can be found on the Remote Teaching at Drexel SharePoint site — be sure to check back to see new updates posted.

You can read a LeBow College of Business clinical professor’s account of turning a weeklong Intensive Course Abroad (ICA) to the Netherlands into a remote course taught over the course of a whole term. You can learn tips from a College of Engineering professor who turned to Drexel Streams and Drexel Blackboard Learn to remotely teach a class he’s taught 14 times in person. And, for more examples, you can start “building camaraderie with game nights,” “nurturing a supportive and inclusive community of learners,” and “creating community during uncertainty.”

If you’ve learned something yourself about teaching remotely and want to share it with your peers, you can write your own story to be shared through the Remote Teaching Task Force.

Read more below about the Remote Teaching Task Force’s call for submissions:

What exactly is the Remote Teaching Task Force looking for?

Posts that are short and clear with an emphasis on concrete strategies, rather than overly theoretical or philosophical ideas. Specifically, we’d like to hear how you have effectively transitioned your course to the remote teaching and learning environment. What did you do? How did it work? What did you discover in the process? What were the challenges and successes? How have students responded? How can others adapt and implement your strategies in their courses? Posts should be approximately 700–1000 words in length and written in a practical and informal tone expected in a blog post. Submissions should not be registered for copyright or published elsewhere (either on paper or electronically).

How can I submit a proposal?

Please send posts or proposals for a post to teachingremotetaskforce@drexel0.onmicrosoft.com.

What happens then?

The Remote Teaching Task Force will review submissions on a rolling basis. Authors of accepted proposals will receive an email with any recommended edits. Once revisions have been made, the remote teaching task force will provide you with an estimated date the post will be added to “Lessons Learned from Remote Teaching.”

I have more questions...

Please contact teachingremotetaskforce@drexel0.onmicrosoft.com.