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Writer Archives

Alex McKechnie

Alex McKechnie was a senior news officer at Drexel from April 2011 to March 2016.

Contact:

news@drexel.edu

215-895-2705

Project HOME alumnus Gerald Halley stands in front of his artwork.

Artwork by Formerly Homeless Artists Exhibited by Project HOME and Drexel

“Artists for All Seasons,” an exhibition of artwork by formerly homeless artists, will be on display at the URBN Center (3501 Market St., Philadelphia) from April 13 – 24.  

Anti-Abortion Terrorism: New Book Tells Untold Stories of Harassment and Violence Faced by Abortion Providers

A groundbreaking new book, Living in the Crosshairs: The Untold Stories of Anti-Abortion Terrorism (Oxford University Press, 2015), examines how those associated with abortion care are harassed, threatened, stalked, picketed, sent hate mail and otherwise terrorized on a daily basis, and how these incidents are drastically increasing

Duke Ellington and his band in wool overcoats and tailored dress signify celebrity status, Los Angeles, 1934. Courtesy of Bettmann/CORBIS.

How Jazz Influenced Fashion: New Book to be Launched During Jazz Appreciation Month this April

A new book by Alphonso D. McClendon, an assistant professor in the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design, entitled Fashion and Jazz: Dress, Identity and Subcultural Improvisation (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015), explores the behaviors, signs and meanings that defined this subculture. The book also addresses Philadelphia’s significant role in jazz history.

Turning “Us” and “Them” into “We” Again

In a public discussion, entitled “Renewing the American “We”: What We Owe James Wilson,” Ambassador Joseph M. Torsella (Ret.) will share his thoughts on how we can – and why we must – renew our sense of American community in these polarized times.
Bartkus' "Beauty and the Beast," 2006-2009.

Renowned International Artist Ray Bartkus Exhibits at Drexel

Storylines, a new exhibition at Drexel University’s Leonard Pearlstein Gallery (3401 Filbert Street) in the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design, presents the work of Lithuanian-born artist and illustrator Ray Bartkus. Creating immersive environments, Bartkus’s monumental, figurative paintings embrace and engulf viewers, projecting them into compelling, mysterious domains. Shown for the first time in the United States, much of this work has been seen internationally in Lithuania, Poland, Austria Japan and the Netherlands. The exhibition will be on display from Tuesday, April 7 – Sunday, May 24.

 

Women with a tendency for excessive weight gain during development may be more susceptible to developing an eating disorder, Drexel research finds.

Elevated Childhood Weight May Increase Risk of Eating Disorders

A group of researchers at Drexel University suggest that actual elevations in body mass during childhood may play a much bigger role in the development of disordered eating than previously thought.
Keith Raimondi (L), head bartender at Townsend and an adjunct professor at Drexel, will teach "Mixology and Spirits." Photo credit: BMK Photography.

Drexel’s New Mixology and Spirits Class is Open to the Public, Taught by Townsend's Keith Raimondi

“Spirits and Mixology” is a new class in Drexel University’s Center for Hospitality and Sport Management, which is open to a limited number of members of the general public. The class also will explore the history, processes and uses of major spirits, emphasizing the foundations of creating a bar program, calculating recipe costs and implementing proper service guidelines.
The Drexel Storylab's "Insider Access Workshops" will use Drexel's unique archival treasures as inspiration for aspiring writers.

What Stories Do You Have to Tell? Drexel’s New Storylab Can Help

The Drexel Storylab, a new initiative in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of English & Philosophy, aims to help writers of all levels jumpstart the creative process by working with established writers and looking for inspiration in unlikely places. 

Protestors carrying placards at a Black Lives Matter demonstration in New York City in Nov. 2014.

#BlackLivesMatter Panel Discussion at Drexel during Black History Month

During Black History Month, a roundtable discussion will be held at Drexel University on Friday, Feb. 20 from 6 – 8 p.m. to examine police violence against African Americans, the criminal justice system and community responses. The event will be held in Drexel's MacAlister Hall, 2019-2020 (3250 Chestnut St., Philadelphia). It is sponsored by Drexel’s Office of Equality and Diversity.
The largely vacant Delaware Power Station dominates more than 1,000 feet of the Delaware River waterfront.

Urban Design and Planning Students Reimagine the Delaware River Waterfront

A select handful of Drexel University’s Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design students interested in urban design will have the opportunity to generate fresh ideas and create a vision for the future of the Lehigh Viaduct, Delaware Power Station and surrounding Port Richmond area. Along with 15 students and two faculty members from Germany’s TU Dortmund University, which researches and teaches the global intersection between man, nature and technology, the students will participate in an intensive urban infrastructure planning and design process to develop concepts for repurposing this post-industrial infrastructure.
The Drexel Co-op Theatre Company will stage a production of “DOG SEES GOD: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead" from Feb. 12-21.

“DOG SEES GOD: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead" Explores a Darker Side of the Peanuts Gang at Drexel

Imagine Charlie Brown and the Peanuts gang as anguished teenagers. The Drexel Co-op Theatre Company will stage a production of “DOG SEES GOD: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead,” an irreverent, yet poignant drama that conceives the teenaged Charlie Brown and his friends as real people dealing with complex issues.
A sculpture by Chakaia Booker entitled “Handle With Care” (34.5” x 98” x 11”).

Poets Create ‘Verbal Sculptures’ Inspired by Tire Exhibition

Amid large-scale sculptures made from recycled tires by contemporary American sculptor and printmaker Chakaia Booker, local poets will create poems, or ‘verbal sculptures,’ inspired by the themes of the artwork at Drexel University during Black History Month.