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Writer Archives

Alex McKechnie

Alex McKechnie was a senior news officer at Drexel from April 2011 to March 2016.

Contact:

news@drexel.edu

215-895-2705

Pope Francis made an evocative call to address the dual problems of environmental degradation and human exploitation. Photo credit: Alfredo Borba.

Debating the Pope: Social Scientists Engage Pope's Call for Climate Change Dialogue in Top Journal

In Pope Francis’ nearly 200-page climate change encyclical, Laudato SI, published earlier this year, he explicitly calls for a “dialogue with all people about our common home.” A group of leading social scientists provide a scholarly foundation for that dialogue in a special series of commentaries published online this week in Nature Climate Change.

Legal and illegal logging increased more than 600 percent in Ghana during a 15-year period. Photo credit: Nicole Arcilla.

As Demand for African Timber Soars, Birds Pay the Ultimate Price

A new study co-authored by scientists at Drexel University reveals the devastating impact of illegal logging on bird communities in the understory layer of Ghana’s Upper Guinea rain forests, one of the world's 25 “biodiversity hotspots."
Researchers from Drexel University studied the relationship between disordered eating and sexuality among adolescents and young adults.

Bisexual and Questioning Women Have Higher Risk of Eating Disorders

Young women who are attracted to both sexes or who are unsure about who they are attracted to are more likely to develop an eating disorder than those attracted to only one sex, according to a new study from Drexel University.
Students transform bruised and misshapen fruits and vegetables into cobblers, shakes and other products in the Drexel Food Lab.

Trash or Treasure? Repurposing Would-Be Wasted Food to Feed the Hungry

A new model for recovering would-be wasted – or surplus – food and repurposing it to feed hungry people, generate revenue and even create jobs was recently piloted in West Philadelphia. Compiled by researchers from Drexel University, the University of Pennsylvania, Cabrini College and the Environmental Protection Agency, the results were published in Food and Nutrition Sciences.

New Book Argues that Social Sciences Are Critical to Climate Conversation

According to the new book “Climate Change and Society: Sociological Perspectives,” engaging the social – and not just natural – sciences in the climate conversation is essential for effecting large-scale change. Edited by environmental sociologists Robert J. Brulle, PhD, a professor in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, and Riley E. Dunlap, a professor at Oklahoma State University, the book breaks new ground by presenting climate change as a thoroughly social phenomenon, embedded in behaviors, institutions and cultural practices.

Photo by Michael J. Shepherd.

Immortal Beauty Exhibition Displays Artifacts from Three Centuries of Fashion History

From a fragment of 16th century Italian velvet to an evening dress by New York designer Alexander Wang from 2012, the first large-scale, retrospective exhibition of highlights from the Robert and Penny Fox Historic Costume Collection in Drexel University’s Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design will trace the arc of fashion history over the course of more than three centuries.
White and Zerban's "Smart Faucet" purifies and conserves water.

A Smarter "Smart Faucet" and Other Inventions by Drexel Seniors

Graduating seniors in Drexel's product design program have created prototypes of products that can solve problems in the world around them. 

“Escaped Infrastructure” at Canal View Park. Photo credit: Thoughtbarn, courtesy of the Mural Arts Program.

Creative Placemaking and Plans for Reimagining Bartram’s Mile: A Public Forum at Drexel

On Thursday, May 14 from 6:30 – 8 p.m., a public lecture and forum, “Making Place by Building Civic Stewardship & Public Art-Making” will take place in Drexel’s Leonard Pearlstein Gallery (3401 Filbert St.). This event is free and open to the public. A reception will be held prior to the event at 6 p.m. Three panelists will give presentations about their work as it relates to creative placemaking, civic stewardship, social equity, public art and environmental infrastructure.
The United Nations Office at Geneva (Switzerland) is the second biggest U.N. center, after the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

Why Reforming the United Nations Is So Hard but So Important

As the United Nations celebrates its 70th anniversary, DrexelNow checked in with Ambassador (Ret.) Joseph M. Torsella, distinguished visiting fellow in the Center for Public Policy in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, who formerly served as the U.S. Representative to the United Nations for U.N. Management and Reform. From 2011-2014, he was responsible for leading efforts to make the U.N. a more efficient, accountable, respected and effective organization. On Wednesday, May 13, Torsella will give a public discussion at Drexel on “The U.S., the U.N. and U.N. Reform: Why its So Hard...and So Important.” The event will take place from 1:30 – 3 p.m. in the Bossone Research Enterprise Center’s Mitchell Auditorium (32nd and Market Streets, Philadelphia).

Seventh Metro Chuch in Baltimore was one of the six historic spaces that participated in the study.

Can Churches and Artists Save Each Other?

Creating a symbiotic relationship in which historic sacred spaces, such as churches, help to alleviate performing artists’ need for space could benefit both groups and better integrate them into the community, according to a new study from Drexel University.
Drexel's day-long Zom(bie) Con symposium is free and open to the public.

Zom(bie) Con: Feed Your Brrraaiins at Drexel’s Symposium on the Undead

Zom(bie) Con: Feed Your Brains, a day-long symposium at Drexel on Thursday, May 14 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., will offer a multiplicity of perspectives on the figure of the zombie. Guest speakers will discuss the zombie in relation to film and videogames, Jewish studies, history, literature and the health sciences, among other fields. It is free and open to the public.
Chang created a "Before I die…" art installation on an 80-foot wall surrounding the construction site of the former University City High School. Photo credit: C. Shan Cerrone.

“Before I Die…” Artist Candy Chang to Speak at Drexel

On Thursday, April 30 from 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m., Taiwanese-American artist Candy Chang will speak on  “Better Cities: Transforming Public Spaces Through Art & Design” at Drexel University’s Mandell Theater (33rd and Chestnut Streets) as the fifth lecturer in the College of Arts and Sciences' annual Distinguished Lecture Series.