Jennifer Quinlan, PhD

Professor, Nutrition Sciences and Food & Hospitality Management Departments
Expertise Food nutrition
Quinlan’s research focuses on identifying potential unique food safety risks for minority racial/ethnic and low-income populations. Quinlan co-developed the Don’t Wash Your Chicken campaign based on surveys conducted by her laboratory finding that washing raw poultry is a common unsafe handling practice across multiple demographics. Her laboratory also conducts basic research on Campylobacter jejuni, a leading bacterial cause of foodborne illness, which is common on chicken.

In The News

Food Scientist Debunks a Dangerous Myth About Chicken
Jennifer Quinlan, PhD, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was quoted in a July 10 Inverse story about why you should not wash raw chicken before cooking it.
4 Natural Cleaning Hacks That Will Sanitize Germ Hot Spots
Jennifer Quinlan, PhD, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was quoted in a March 19 Woman’s World article about cleaning hacks, including how to sanitize a kitchen sponge.
Here’s Why You Should Never Wash Chicken Before Cooking It
Jennifer Quinlan, PhD, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was quoted in a July 15 Reader’s Digest article about the dangers of washing raw chicken.
Does Protein Powder Really Expire? Here's What Food Safety Experts Want You to Know
Jennifer Quinlan, PhD, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was quoted in an April 8 Women's Health story about what the expiration date on protein powder actually means.
Organic Chicken Is Half As Likely to Be Contaminated With Salmonella
A Nov. 21 Runner's World article quoting Jennifer Quinlan, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, about ways to avoid Salmonella contamination with poultry was picked up Nov. 27 by Bicycling magazine.
Please! For the Love of Food Safety, Stop Washing Your Chicken
A 2013 study led by Jennifer Quinlan, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was mentioned in a Sept. 27 Food Network story about the dangers of washing raw chicken.
New USDA Study: Washing Raw Poultry Increases Risk of Contaminating Foods, Surfaces
A 2013 study examining the effects of washing raw chicken, conducted by Jennifer Quinlan, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was mentioned in an Aug. 20 WCAU-TV (NBC-10) story about the latest warning from the USDA to not wash raw chicken. The story was picked up by NBC affiliates across the country, including New York, Los Angeles and Dallas.
Does Protein Powder Really Expire?
Jennifer Quinlan, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was quoted in an Aug. 14 Women's Health story about what the expiration date on protein powder actually means.

Related Articles

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Grad Student's No Chicken When it Comes To Hard Work
Shauna Henley is the Drexel University graduate student behind the “Don’t Wash Your Chicken” education campaign that’s appearing in media reports around the nation.
"Don't Wash Your Chicken" Video Vignettes Make Cooking Safer
Drexel food safety researchers have helped develop a new educational campaign to raise awareness that washing raw poultry prior to cooking risks spreading bacteria, without any benefit of removing or killing them.
beef Q&A with Jennifer Quinlan: After Europe's Contaminated Meat Controversy, Is the U.S. at Risk?
European consumers recently went into an uproar after horse meat was discovered in products that were labeled as 100 percent beef. Drexel's Dr. Jennifer Quinlan weighs in on how this could have occurred and what it means for carnivores.
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