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Summer Courses



April 22, 2016

Students will witness the power of poetry firsthand at CHOP, understand the significance of the U.S.-Mexican War, and explore the human mind and consciousness in these summer courses.

Community-Based Learning

English

Readings in Poetry: Poetry Medicine (ENGL 215.001)
Community Partner: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Students will have the opportunity to see firsthand how poetry has the power to heal. Meeting one day a week at Drexel and one day a week within the hospital setting at CHOP, students will help design and teach creative writing workshops to young patients. Students will be an integral part of a new program called “Paper Trails” on the hospital’s closed circuit 24/7 TV network Galaxy 51. The TV program hosts guests who focus on creative arts and expression for patients and their families.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Jill Moses, will meet on Tuesday and Thursday, 11 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Locations: Tuesdays: One Drexel Plaza, Room GL22. Thursdays: CHOP.

English

Major Authors: Dickinson and Whitman (ENGL 320.001)

In this class, students will look at two North American poets creating revolutionary work during a period of intense historical upheaval. In the mythic sweep of Whitman’s prophetic and psalmic self-promotion and the gemlike facets of Emily Dickinson’s uncommon verse, we find the essential forces of modern poetic action: contraction and expansion.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Kirsten Kaschock, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students who have completed ENGL 103 Minimum Grade: D or ENGL 105 Minimum Grade: A. The class will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Location: Randel Hall, Room 323. This is a writing-intensive course.

History

U.S.-Mexican War (HIST T380.001)

The war between the United States and Mexico was one of the most important moments in the national history of each country. Although there is a great deal of scholarship on the war and its context, there is little public understanding of the historical significance of the war in the United States.

This 3.0 credit class, taught by Don Stevens, PhD, is open to all students and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 – 1:50 pm. Location: MacAlister Hall, Room 4011.

Philosophy

ST: Extended Mind (PHIL T280.001)

Is the human mind just the brain and its functions? This class doubts it. Students will explore developing research and theories into the human mind and consciousness that challenge traditional philosophical and cognitive approaches by suggesting their minds literally go beyond their skulls. Such theories will include extended minds, enactive minds, embodied minds, embedded minds, and potentially affective minds. Time permitting, students may discuss these new and bold theories in relation to the phenomenological tradition and rationalist tradition. No prior philosophical or psychological knowledge required.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Patrick Denehy, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students above the freshman level and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30 – 4:50 p.m. Location: MacAlister Hall, Room 4011.

Business Ethics (PHIL 301.001)

Most business decisions have obvious and important ethical dimensions. This class won’t tell students what the answers are to ethical questions, but it will help them recognize, understand, confront and resolve the kinds of questions that normally arise in everyday business activities.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Eric Fleming, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students above the freshman level and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 - 1:50 p.m. Location: MacAlister Hall, Room 4014.

ST: Ethics and Legal Practice (PHIL T380.001)

The life of a legal professional can be fraught with questions of ethics and professional responsibility. The trust placed in members of the legal profession by clients, the courts, and society at large can lead to a number of questions, not only about what someone in the legal profession can do, but, more importantly, what someone in the legal profession should do. This course will explore many of the ethical issues and dilemmas faced by those working within the legal field. Students will address many topics stemming from the tension between the legal professional's duty to his/her client and his/her individual duty to the legal profession and society at large.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Michael D. Vitlip, JD, is open to all undergraduate students above the freshman level and will meet Mondays, 6 – 8:50p.m. Location: MacAlister Room 4011.

ST: Søren Kierkegaard: On Becoming A Person (PHIL T480.001)

The Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard is often regarded as the first Existentialist. As such, he asked and addressed questions like “Who am I?” “Why am I here?” “What is the meaning of my life?” and “Why am I so often in despair?” He also asked the question: “Why is it that life must be lived forward but can only be understood backwards?” In this class we will explore some of Kierkegaard's puzzles, focusing on his notion of what it means to become and be a “person.”

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Stacey Ake, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students above the sophomore level and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30-4:50 p.m. Location: Problem Solving Research Center Room 217.

Political Science

ST: Civic Field School (PSCI T280.001)
Hybrid Class

In this course, students will investigate how science and local expertise supports environmental health governance in Philadelphia. Students will learn social science field techniques relevant to understanding community problems with global perspective. Assignments will teach students how to interview, take ethnographic field notes, and conduct collaborative analysis. The course will make use of a virtual research environment where students can curate and discuss data. Case studies will include lead exposure and late industrialism; scrapyard siting and management; climate change and air pollution research, among others.

This 4.0 credit class, taught by Ali Kenner, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students above the freshman level. The class will meet for five weeks in the second part of the summer quarter on Mondays and Wednesdays, 2 – 3:50 p.m. Location: Curtis Hall Room 250A. Additional online hours are required.

Explore more summer courses here.