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January

  • Drexel Professor Co-Writes Memoir of Grammy Award-Winning World Music Artist AngĂ©lique Kidjo

    January 28, 2014

    Hailed as “the undisputed queen of African music” (Daily Telegraph) and “Africa’s premier diva” (TIME), Angélique Kidjo is a Grammy Award-winning artist with a mission to unite different cultures through music, while raising global respect for her native continent. In her debut memoir, “SPIRIT RISING: My Life, My Music,” which was released by Harper Collins on Jan. 7, Kidjo shares the inspiring story of her journey from a little-known city in Benin, on the west coast of Africa, to international superstardom. The autobiography was co-written with Rachel Wenrick, an associate teaching professor of English in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences.

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  • Bob Brehm and Scott Gabriel Knowles

    After Building Collapse, Two Drexel Profs Will Help Philadelphia Move Forward

    January 23, 2014

    Bob Brehm came to Drexel to get away from the news cameras, but he found himself in front of them after Philadelphia's deadly Market Street building collapse in June 2013. Now he and another Drexel professor, Scott Gabriel Knowles, are stepping up to help the city in the collapse's wake.

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  • Fossil Find Shows Fish Hips Grew Strong Before Life's First Steps

    January 13, 2014

    The discovery of new fossil materials from the ancient fish species Tiktaalik roseae has revealed a key link in the evolution of hind limbs. The newly described, well-preserved pelves and partial pelvic fin from this 375 million-year-old transitional species between fish and the first legged animals, reveals that the evolution of hind legs actually began as enhanced hind fins, contrary to the existing theory that large hind legs developed after vertebrates transitioned to land.

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  • GPS Traffic Maps for Leatherback Turtles Show Hotspots to Prevent Accidental Fishing Deaths

    January 08, 2014

    The leatherback turtle in the Pacific Ocean is one of the most endangered animals in the world. Its population has declined by more than 90 percent since 1980. One of the greatest sources of mortality is industrial longlines that set thousands of hooks in the ocean to catch fish, but sometimes catch sea turtles as well. Using modern GPS technology, researchers are now able to predict where fisheries and turtles will interact and to reduce the unwanted capture of turtles by fishermen.

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  • Paperwasps in Different Castes Develop Different-Sized Sensory Brain Structures

    January 06, 2014

    A queen in a paperwasp colony largely stays in the dark. The worker wasps, who fly outside to seek food and building materials, see much more of the world around them. A new study led by Drexel professor Sean O'Donnell, PhD, indicates that the brain regions involved in sensory perception also develop differently in these castes, according to the different behavioral reliance on the senses.

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