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Event Details

BEES Graduate Research Seminar: DRWI Speakers

Thursday, October 22, 2020

3:30 PM-5:00 PM

Delaware River Watershed Initiative Speakers

 

You are invited to attend the entire DRWI conference online for free, which runs from 10:00 am – 4:30 pm. Our speakers will present the final two papers in the conference. Register at this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/4th-annual-virtual-delaware-watershed-research-conference-tickets-119690181555

3:40-4:00 pm:  Erik Silldorf from Delaware Riverkeeper Network

Restoring Dissolved Oxygen in the Delaware Estuary: Economic Valuation

Erik L. Silldorff, Carolyn Alkire, and Sonia Wang

Renewed investment by regional stakeholders seeks to bring the Delaware Estuary into full compliance with the goals of the Clean Water Act and protective dissolved oxygen (D.O.) standards. Our research seeks to evaluate candidate D.O. targets for the estuary, and to quantify in economic terms the benefits of efforts to restore D.O. in the Delaware River Estuary. Multiple lines of evidence have been used to develop likely D.O. concentration distributions for the Delaware Estuary across the D.O. sag zone from Philadelphia to Wilmington. From these D.O. distributions, we have evaluated how changes to water quality affect the ecology of the estuary’s ecosystem and how changes provide economic benefits to human communities, with spatially explicit modeling of these benefits. We estimate dissolved oxygen improvements under a “Moderate Restoration” scenario could stimulate ecosystem service benefits totaling $44 million to $62 million annually. This includes a one-time increase in property values ranging from $540 to $840 million. These conservative estimates of total economic benefits, when paired with the strictly ecological benefits themselves, can help inform current policy making and can lead to the complete restoration of dissolved oxygen and the fulfillment of Clean Water Act goals in the Delaware Estuary.

4:00-4:20 pm: Shane McLoughlin and Shannon McGinnis from Temple University

Understanding the Health Risks due to Recreation along Wissahickon Creek: Preliminary Data from Summer 2020 Sampling

Shane McLoughlin, Shannon McGinnis, Heather Murphy

Measuring health risks due to recreation along natural waterways provides much needed information for making recommendations around how and where to recreate safely. While recreational activities such as swimming, wading, and fishing are frequently observed at various sites along the Wissahickon Creek in Philadelphia, little information is available around the potential health risks of recreating there. To better understand this issue, in summer 2020, the Water, Health, and Applied Microbiology (WHAM) Lab in Temple University’s College of Public Health collected samples from 5 sites along the Wissahickon Creek in Philadelphia where recreation occurs (n= 50 samples total). In addition, samples were collected from two sites that are impacted by combined sewer overflows, along Tacony Creek and Cobbs Creek in Philadelphia (n=20). While analyses are ongoing, this presentation will share preliminary data on concentrations of fecal indicator organisms measured during dry weather (>24 hours after rainfall) and wet weather (<24 hours after rainfall) conditions at these sites. In addition, this presentation will discuss how future analyses will use quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of illness due to the types of recreational activities that have been observed.

Contact Information

Amanda Leslie
bees@drexel.edu

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Location

Please email bees@drexel.edu for the Zoom link

Audience

  • Everyone