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Elizabeth Kimball, Assistant Professor, Department of English and Philosophy, Drexel University

Elizabeth Kimball, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of English and Philosophy
Office: MacAlister 5033
elizabeth.kimball@drexel.edu
Phone: 215.895.2444

Additional Sites: elizabethkimballphd.wordpress.com

Education:

  • Temple University, PhD, 2010
  • Rutgers University-Camden, MA, 2003
  • Earlham College, BA, 1996

Research Interests:

  • College writing
  • Civic and engaged learning
  • Multilingual and trans lingual practice
  • History and theory of rhetoric
  • Public and community writing
  • 18th and 19th century U.S. rhetorical history

Bio:

Elizabeth (Liz) Kimball holds a PhD in English, with an emphasis in rhetoric and composition, from Temple University.  She works in community and public writing, multilingual practice, rhetorical history, and engaged teaching and inclusive pedagogies. Her book manuscript, "Translingual Inheritance: Language Diversity in Early National Philadelphia", examines the dimensions of linguistic practice in the German, Quaker and African American communities at the time of U.S. national formation. She is an experienced writing program administrator and has developed a variety of successful community partnerships.

Selected Publications:

  • "Cross-Language Community Engagement: Assessing the Strengths of Heritage Learners." Co-author with Elise DuBord. Invited contribution for special issue "Service Learning with Heritage Language Learners and Communities." Heritage Language Journal 13(3), December 2016.
  • “Writing the Personal in an Outcomes-Based World.” Co-author with Emily Schnee and Liesl Schwabe. Composition Studies, 43.2, Fall 2015. 113-131.
  • “Translingual Communities: Teaching and Learning Where You Don’t Know the Language.” Community Literacy Journal, 9.2, Spring 2015. 68-82.
  • "Commonplace, Quakers, and the Founding of Haverford School." Rhetoric Review, 30.4, 2011. 372-388