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Fall Institute on Implementation Science

Fall Institute on Implementation Science Research: Bringing Evidence to Real World Settings to Promote Health Equity •  October 26 – 28, 2020 • Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions • Virtual Conference • Hosted by Dean Gitlin and Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN

The Fall Institute is designed to provide a foundation in implementation science and the conduct of studies that result in high impact in real-world settings.

 

Through readings, lectures by leading experts and interactive small group sessions, participants will gain information on how to design studies to evaluate implementation processes and prepare for dissemination and scaling of evidence into practice settings such as healthcare, community-based organizations, educational institutions and more.

This virtual conference will provide attendees with opportunities to appraise their research through the lens of implementation science, pragmatism and health equity integrating evidence into diverse settings. Participants will learn and discuss theories, methodologies, measures, grant writing strategies and barriers and solutions for disseminating and implementing evidence into real-world settings.

Join us for the opportunity to network and learn about the emerging area of implementation science and funding opportunities in this area.

Pricing

October 26 & 27: Only $199
October 28th Grant Workshop: Only $99

Space is limited. Pricing Includes:

  • Registration and access to all course materials for the days registered.
  • Access to respected experts for panel sessions, questions/answer and reflection periods and during hands-on, break-out sessions.
  • A chance to receive a book prize. Actively participate in the conference and two winners will receive either:
    • Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health: Translating Science to Practice by Ross C. Brownson, Graham A. Colditz, Enola K. Proctor
    • Behavioral Interventions Research by Dean Laura N. Gitlin and Dr. Sara Czaja
  • A complimentary book entitled, Successful Grant Writing: Strategies for Health and Human Service Professionals by Dean Laura N. Gitlin, Kolonaswki, Lyons fifth edition, 2020 et. al. (*applicable for those who attend all three days of the conference).

Benefits of Attending:

  • Learn how to design, implement and evaluate behavioral interventions in real-world settings.
  • Identify theories and measures to advance implementation of your evidence into a real-world settings.
  • Examine how and when to involve community and practice-based partners.
  • Understand how implementation science is based on health equity.
  • Understand strategies for writing a successful, innovative grant for implementation science research.

NEW – Grant Workshop
October 28th, 8 a.m. – 12 p.m. (EDT)

Benefits of Attending:

  • Have granting opportunities and sources of funding for your implementation science research.
  • Work with you on developing your specific aims and hypotheses.
  • Set you up with a timeline and a personal/virtual consultant(s) to make sure you are meeting your goals/objectives/timelines.
  • Have a biostatistician help you with your statistical questions and methods for powering your research.
  • Have a Mock study section/review panel – this will enable you to experience what happens once your grant leaves your hands/institution.
  • You will leave the symposium armed to write and submit a fundable grant application!

Who Should Attend:

  • Faculty and Researchers.
  • Post-doctoral Fellows.
  • Clinicians and Allied Health Professionals.
  • Educators.
  • Community-based Leaders.

Keynote Speaker

Patricia Jones, DrPH, MPH

Patricia Jones, DrPH, MPH, MS
Director, Office of Special Populations
National Institute on Aging

Patricia Jones is the director of the Office of Special Populations at the National Institute on Aging. Dr. Jones is a behavioral Scientist and holds a doctorate in public health in Health Promotion and Health Education, a Master of Public Health in Behavioral Sciences and Health Education and a Master of Science in Biotechnology. She has expertise in advancing health equity and addressing disparities among under-included communities, implementation and dissemination sciences, community engagement and program evaluation. Her efforts include translating evidence-based behavioral interventions designed for African American women, African American men, people who use drugs (PWUD), youth living with HIV to reduce HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) transmission.

Dr. Jones' presentation will address the intersectionality of health equity and implementation science, building a robust research workforce and co-creating relevant programs that address health disparities.

Plenary Speaker

Rinad Beidas, PhD

Rinad Beidas, PhD
LDI Senior Fellow
University of Pennsylvania

Rinad Beidas is an associate professor of Psychiatry and Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the founder and director of the Penn Implementation Science Center at the Leonard Davis Institute (PISCE@LDI). Her research focuses on advancing the study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of evidence-based practices into routine clinical care to improve the quality and effectiveness of health and behavioral health services.

Click Here for Full Bio.

Harnessing Implementation Science to Realize the Promise
of Evidence-Based Practice

Implementation science, or the study of methods to improve the adoption, implementation, and sustainment of evidence-based practices (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy), has grown exponentially in the past decade in response to growing concerns about the research to practice chasm. Implementation researchers have developed a set of frameworks, measures, and outcomes to guide empirical inquiry. In this talk, I will share the development of my implementation research program with an eye towards grounding the findings within the broader field. I will describe how my research has evolved from understanding the determinants of implementation (e.g., knowledge, attitudes, organizational culture) to testing the comparative effectiveness of strategies to change clinician behavior with a focus on targets and mechanisms. I will describe the community-partnered empirical work that I have conducted within the natural laboratory of a system-wide initiative supporting cognitive-behavioral therapy in the City of Philadelphia. I will conclude with future areas of emphasis for the field of implementation science in order to achieve the promise of evidence-based practice.

Grant Writing Workshop Speaker

Carl Hill, PhD, MPH

Carl Hill, PhD, MPH
Vice President, Special Engagement
Alzheimer’s Association

Carl V. Hill, PhD, MPH, is vice president of Scientific Engagement for the Alzheimer’s Association®. In this role, he oversees strategic efforts to create global awareness of the Association’s international research program.

Dr. Hill leads outreach to a network of staff, volunteers and donors at more than 75 Association chapters in order to grow understanding of the Association’s role in accelerating Alzheimer’s research and share scientific updates. To advance the Association’s scientific agenda, he will disseminate knowledge of the organization’s research program at key events, and work cross-functionally to build programs related to public health and the engagement of physicians and other health care groups.

Prior to joining the Association, Dr. Hill served as director of the Office of Special Populations at the National Institute on Aging (NIA). In his six years at the NIA, he led the development of the health disparities research framework, which stimulates studies focused on health disparities related to aging. Dr. Hill also directed the Butler-Williams Scholars Program, which provides yearly training for early-career investigators interested in aging research.

Dr. Hill earned his PhD from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, where he trained with the Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health (CRECH) and the Program for Research on Black Americans (PRBA). He is an alumnus of the National Medical Fellowships Inc./W.K. Kellogg Foundation Health Policy Fellowship Program. Dr. Hill holds a master’s degree in public health from Morehouse School of Medicine, and he received its Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2019. As a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Public Health Prevention Service, a training and leadership program, he helped to establish the Center for Bioethics in Research and Healthcare at Tuskegee University.

The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more information, visit alz.org.

Guest Speakers

James E. Connell, Jr., PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D

James E. Connell, Jr., PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D

James E. Connell, Jr., PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D
Associate Professor
Drexel University, School of Education

James Connell’s doctorate is a nationally certified school psychologist, and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Dr. Connell’s former appointments include the University of Pennsylvania’s (Penn) School of Medicine with a secondary appointment in The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s (CHOP) Center for Autism Research (CAR). Prior to Penn, Dr. Connell was an assistant professor at Temple University. While his research interests are varied, one main theme has emerged over the years: Identifying the variables that influence adult behavior change in community settings. He has researched and extensively studied models of community-based consultation and their relative effectiveness on program implementation in large and small agencies. He continues this theme with research projects focused on the widespread dissemination of evidence-based interventions in community settings and with various stakeholders. One of his scholarly goals is to add to the dissemination and implementation literature by evaluating and reporting the active mechanisms and core components that facilitate systems-level change and program adoption. Dr. Connell is now associate professor in the School of Education at Drexel University, and research fellow in the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute.

Richard H. Fortinsky, PhD

Richard H. Fortinsky, PhD

Richard H. Fortinsky, PhD
Professor
Center on Aging, School of Medicine, UConn Health (Affiliate)

Richard H. Fortinsky, is a professor at the University of Connecticut (UConn) School of Medicine, where he is a core faculty member at the UConn Center on Aging and holds the Health Net, Inc. Endowed Chair in Geriatrics and Gerontology. He holds secondary academic appointments at UConn in the School of Nursing and in the Department of Public Health Sciences, and provides academic mentorship to students, trainees, and junior faculty members in geriatric medicine, nursing, and public health. For more than 40 years, Dr. Fortinsky has collaborated with colleagues from a wide range of clinical and scientific disciplines, and with numerous community-based organization and health care system partners, to design and carry out studies intended to improve care and optimize health-related outcomes for older adults and their families. He has published extensively in the aging field, has chaired study sections for the National Institutes of Health, and has held national leadership positions with the Gerontological Society of America and the American Public Health Association. Dr. Fortinsky presently serves as principal investigator for clinical trials funded by the National Institute on Aging and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute designed to test in-home, team-based interventions targeting older adults with dementia, depression and a history of delirium and their families. Dr. Fortinsky received his doctoral degree in Sociology in 1984 from Brown University, specializing in medical sociology and gerontology.

Joseph E. Gaugler, PhD

Joseph E. Gaugler, PhD

Joseph E. Gaugler, PhD
Robert L. Kane Endowed Chair in Chair in Long-Term Care and Aging
University of Minnesota, Division of Health Policy and Management and School of Public Health

Joseph Gaugler is the Robert L. Kane Endowed Chair in Long-Term Care & Aging in the School of Public Health Division of Health Policy and Management. His research examines the sources and effectiveness of long-term care for persons with Alzheimer's disease and other chronic conditions. An applied gerontologist, Dr. Gaugler's interests include Alzheimer's disease and long-term care, the longitudinal ramifications of family care for persons with dementia and other chronic conditions, and the effectiveness of community-based and psychosocial services for older adults with dementia and their caregiving families. Underpinning these substantive areas, Dr. Gaugler also has interests in longitudinal and mixed methods.

Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH, MSc

Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH, MSc

Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH, MSc
Associate Professor
Drexel University, Dornsife School of Public Health
Department of Health Management & Policy

Jonathan Purtle is an associate professor in the Department of Health Management & Policy at the Drexel Dornsife School of Public Health. He is a policy dissemination and implementation researcher who focuses on issues related to mental health and health equity. His research uses theories and methods from the social sciences to understand how scientific evidence can be most effectively communicated to policymakers and translated into practice.

Dr. Purtle is Principal Investigator of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded study that is testing the effects of strategic frames about toxic stress on public and policymaker support for child development policies and stigma towards children and families. He is also co-director of a NIMH/NIDA-funded P50 project that is using agent-based modeling to understand factors that influence research use in children's state mental health policymaking. He was PI of a NIMH-funded R21 that surveyed state legislators to understand their opinions about mental health and substance use issues and how they use evidence in decision making. He is co-investigator of a NIMHD-funded R01 that is assessing the mental health impacts of Hurricane Maria on Island Puerto Ricans (PIs Ortega and Canino) and a NIMH-funded R01 that is assessing the effects of public housing policies on HIV/STI risk (PI Blankenship).

Dr. Purtle received his DrPH in Health Management & Policy from the Dornsife School of Public Health and holds a master's degree in sociology from the De Universiteit van Amsterdam and an MPH from Drexel. His research has been published in journals such as the Annual Review of Public Health, The Milbank Quarterly, Implementation Science, Annals of Internal Medicine, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, American Journal of Public Health, Psychiatric Services, and Social Science & Medicine.

Interactive Small Group Facilitators

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN
Dean and Distinguished University Professor, College of Nursing and Health Professions

Laura N. Gitlin, an applied research sociologist, is the dean of the College of Nursing and Health Professions at Drexel University. Dr. Gitlin is nationally and internationally recognized for her research on developing, evaluating and implementing novel home and community-based interventions that improve quality of life of persons with dementia and their family caregivers, enhance daily function of older adults with disability and address mental health disparities. She is a well-funded researcher, having received continuous research and training grants from federal agencies and private foundations for over 35 years.

Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN

Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN
Vice President, Health and Health Equity; Professor, College of Nursing and Health Professions

Loretta Sweet Jemmott is one of the nation's foremost researchers in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention, having the most consistent track record of evidenced-based HIV risk-reduction interventions with over $150 million in federal funding. Aimed at increasing safer sex behaviors, these studies have not only demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV/STD risk associated behaviors, but have also reduced the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases.

Dr. Jemmott is an outstanding translational researcher, who has had global impact. She has partnered with community-based organizations, including churches, clinics, barbershops, and schools and transformed her NIH funded evidenced- based research outcomes for use in real world settings. To date, nine of her evidenced-based HIV/STD and pregnancy prevention curricula have been designated by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office of Adolescent Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for national and international dissemination. To date, over 45 states across the country (including Alaska, the Virgin Islands and Hawaii) are incorporating one of her nine curricula in their schools, clinics, churches, or community-based agency programs.

Deborah J. Clegg, PhD

Deborah J. Clegg, PhD
Associate Dean for Research, College of Nursing and Health Professions

Deborah Clegg has a long-standing career in research. She is a leader in the field of research focusing on the role of sex hormones and how they influence all aspects of metabolism. She is a consultant for the NIH and is a standing member of study sections for the NIH, the VA study section, and the American Diabetes Association. Dr. Clegg is called upon by international and national institutions and researchers to provide guidance on how to develop hypotheses and write research proposals. Dr. Clegg has won numerous awards for her research to include the 2019 Linda and Jack Gill Award for transformative research. She will bring her passion for research and her knowledge of grantsmanship to the 3rd day and will assist you with all of your granting needs!

Jennifer Quinlan, Phd

Jennifer Quinlan, PhD
Professor, College of Nursing and Health Professions

Jennifer Quinlan is a professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences at Drexel University. Her U.S. Department of Agriculture-funded research program has conducted interdisciplinary “community to bench” research which has identified food safety risks for low income and minority populations at both the consumer and retail levels. Her groups research has resulted in consumer food safety education materials which have had national and international impact.

Dr. Quinlan currently serves on the editorial boards of Food Protection Trends and the Journal of Food Protection and is on the program committee for the Partnership for Food Safety Education. She served two terms on USDA’s National Advisory Committee for Microbiological Criteria for Foods and is a former Fulbright Scholar to Corvinus University in Budapest, Hungary.

Michael Bruneau, Jr., PhD

Michael Bruneau, Jr., PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor, College of Nursing and Health Professions

Michael Bruneau research interests include the use of physical activity and exercise as a nonpharmacological lifestyle therapy for the prevention, treatment, and control of chronic disease. His more recent work has involved the examination of supervised exercise in clinical populations, including those living with overweight and obesity, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, HIV/AIDS, and substance use disorder. Aside from his experience with exercise interventional trials, Michael has also conducted research in the sciences of systematic review and meta-analysis.

Rose Ann DiMaria-Ghalili, PhD, RN FASPEN, FAAN, FGSA

Rose Ann DiMaria-Ghalili, PhD, RN FASPEN, FAAN, FGSA
Professor of Nursing and Associate Dean for Interprofessional Research and Development

Rose Ann DiMaria-Ghalili, blends her passion for nursing, the older adult, and nutrition into a strong body of interdisciplinary research which impacts practice. Dr. DiMaria-Ghalili’s efforts are recognized nationally across disciplines (nursing, nutrition, medicine, and engineering) and contexts (research, practice, and policy). Her research focuses on the impact of nutrition and use of cutting-edge technology on recovery, quality of life, and health outcomes in older adults with acute and chronic conditions. Recognizing the need to improve the measurement of nutritional intake, Dr. DiMaria-Ghalili led a team of engineers on the research and development of a patented wireless device to track and monitor fluid intake. She is also a member of an interdisciplinary team of engineers and physicians developing and testing therapeutic ultrasound and diffuse correlational spectroscopy to monitor and treat chronic wounds. During 2007-2009 Dr. DiMaria-Ghalili was a Claire M. Fagin Fellow in the John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity program.

Progam Schedule (Subject to change)

DAY 1

9:00 – 9:15 a.m.

Welcome • Overview of the Day

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN
Distinguished University Professor and Dean
College of Nursing and Health Professions

Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN
Vice President of Health and Health Equity
Drexel University 

9:15 – 9:20 a.m.

Keynote Introduction

9:20 – 10:20 a.m.

Keynote Speaker

Patricia Jones, DRPH, MPH
Director, Office of Special Populations
National Institute on Aging

10:20 – 10:35 a.m.

Transition to Interactive Small Group Sessions

10:35 – 11:50 a.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 1.
Implementation Science: Theories and Models to Guide Implementation Science

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN

  • Review the importance of theory.
  • Discuss the role of theory in implementation science.
  • Discuss how theory can guide selection of implementation.

10:35 – 11:50 a.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 2.
Organizational Behavior Change: What Strategies are Needed for Success

Michael Bruneau Jr. PhD, ASCM, EP-C

  • Identify implementation strategies that have been proven to be effective.
  • Describe challenges and solutions in using strategies.

10:35 – 11:50 a.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 3.
Implementation Science: How to Measure it and have Fidelity

Joseph E. Gaugler, PhD

  • Describe how to identify the targets of change in implementation science: organizational receptivity rather than patient outcome.
  • Discuss the challenges of treatment adherence in real world settings.
  • Describe how to use treatment fidelity as a training and quality improvement tool.

10:35 – 11:50 a.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 4.
Using a Social Justice and Implementation Science Lens to Develop Behavioral Interventions

Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN

  • Identify strategies for developing a behavioral intervention.
  • Discuss the role of a formative research in theory while developing a behavioral intervention.
  • Describe how to develop a behavioral intervention with an implementation science lens.

11:50 – 12:00 p.m.

Break

12:00 – 12:30 p.m.

Reflections for Morning Small Group Sessions
Questions and Answers

Michael Bruneau Jr. PhD, ACSM EP-C

12:30 – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch Break

1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

Ask an Expert

Dean Gitlin, Drs. Jemmott, Gaugler, Di-Maria-Gahlili, Clegg

  • Develop insight and research advice from experts.
  • Discuss challenges and opportunities associated with implementation science research.

2:00 – 2:15 p.m.

Transition to Interactive Small Group Session

2:15 – 3:30 p.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 1.
Implementation Science: Theories and Models to Guide the Process

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN

  • Discuss the importance of theory.
  • Review the role of theory in implementation science.
  • Discuss how theory can guide selection of implementation.

2:15 – 3:30 p.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 2.
Organizational Behavior Change: What Strategies are Needed for Success

Michael Bruneau Jr. PhD, ASCM, EP-C

  • Identify implementation strategies that have been proven to be effective.
  • Describe challenges and solutions in using strategies.

2:15 – 3:30 p.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 3.
Implementation Science: How to Measure it and have Fidelity

Joseph E. Gaugler, PhD

  • Identify the targets of change in implementation science: organizational receptivity rather than patient outcome.
  • Discuss the challenges of treatment adherence in real world settings.
  • Describe how to use treatment fidelity as a training and quality improvement tool.

2:15 – 3:30 p.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 4.
Using a Social Justice and Implementation Science Lens to Develop Behavioral Interventions

Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN

  • Identify strategies for developing a behavioral intervention.
  • Discuss the role of a formative research in theory while developing a behavioral intervention.
  • Describe how to develop a behavioral intervention with an implementation science lens.

3:30 – 3:45 p.m.

Transition to Main Zoom

3:45 – 4:15 p.m.

Questions and Answers
Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN

4:15 – 4:30 p.m.

Evaluation
Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN

4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Virtual Poster Networking Session

DAY 2

9:00 – 9:15 a.m.

Welcome

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN
Distinguished University Professor Dean
College of Nursing and Health Professions

  • Introductions
  • Objectives
  • Overview of day

9:15 – 9:20 a.m.

Introduction of Plenary Speaker

9:20 – 10:20 p.m.

Plenary Speaker

Rinad Beidas, PhD
LDI Senior Fellow
University of Pennsylvania

10:20 – 10:35 a.m.

Transition into Interactive Small Group Sessions

10:35 – 11:45 a.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 1.
Team Science and Grant Writing: Possible Strategies for Being Successful

Rose Ann DiMaria-Ghalili, PhD, RN, CNSC, FASPEN, FAAN, FGSA

  • Discuss successful strategies for team science.
  • Identify the steps of the grant writing and submission process.
  • Recognize the additional components for an intervention grant.
  • Discuss how to use a framework to develop the specific aims page.

10:35 – 11:45 a.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 2.
Implementation Science Strategies to Enhance Community and Stakeholder Engagement

Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN

  • Describe the role of a community partner.
  • Describe strategies for engaging the community.
  • Discuss lessons learned of working with researchers.

10:35 – 11:45 a.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 3.
Effective Strategies for Successful Implementation Science Research

Rinad Beidas, PhD

  • Discuss organizational structures and hierarchies and how they can impact implementation.
  • Discuss organizational cultures and how their values can dictate the fit of your implementation strategy.
  • Identify types of organizational behavior and how they can effect implementation and adoption of your research.

10:35 – 11:45 a.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 4.
Creating Sustainable Evidence-Based Programs in Real-World Settings

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN

  • Describe the challenges of sustaining evidence in real world settings.
  • Identify potential strategies that can support sustaining use of evidence.
  • Examine the role of organizational readiness, and other environmental factors on sustainability.

11:45 – 12:00 p.m.

Transition to Interactive Small Group Sessions

12:00 – 12:30 p.m.

Reflections for Morning Small Group Sessions
Questions and Answers

12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

Lunch

1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Panel Session
Bringing Evidence to Real World Practice

  • Rinad Beidas, PhD
  • Joseph E. Gaugler, PhD
  • Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH, MSc
  • James E. Connell, Jr., PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D

2:30 – 2:45 a.m.

Transition into Interactive Small Group Sessions

2:45 – 3:55 p.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 1.
Team Science and Grant Writing: Possible Strategies for Being Successful

Rose Ann DiMaria-Ghalili, PhD, RN, CNSC, FASPEN, FAAN, FGSA

  • Discuss successful strategies for team science.
  • Identify the steps of the grant writing and submission process.
  • Recognize the additional components for an intervention grant.
  • Describe how to use a framework to develop the specific aims page.

2:45 – 3:55 p.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 2.
Implementation Science Strategies to Enhance
Community and Stakeholder Engagement

Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN

  • Describe the role of a community partner.
  • Discuss lessons learned of working with researchers.

2:45 – 3:55 p.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 3.
Effective Strategies for Successful Implementation Science Research

Rinad Beidas, PhD

  • Discuss organizational structures and hierarchies and how they can impact implementation.
  • Discuss organizational cultures and how their values can dictate the fit of your implementation strategy.
  • Identify types of organizational behavior and how they can effect implementation and adoption of your research.

2:45 – 3:55 p.m.

Interactive Small Group Session 4.
Creating Sustainable Evidence-Based Programs in
Real-World Settings

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN

  • Describe the challenges of sustaining evidence in real world settings.
  • Identify potential strategies that can support sustaining use of evidence.
  • Examine the role of organizational readiness, and other environmental factors on sustainability.

3:55 – 4:10 p.m.

Transition to main Zoom Session

4:10 – 4:40 p.m.

Questions and Answers with Presenters
Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, RN, FAAN

4:40 – 5:00 p.m.

Closing Remarks and Evaluation
Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN

DAY 3 – Grant Workshop

8:30 – 8:35 a.m.

Welcome

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN
Distinguished University Professor Dean
College of Nursing and Health Professions

  • Introductions
  • Objectives
  • Overview of day

8:35 – 9:30 a.m.

Nut and Bolts: Developing an Implementation Science Grant Tool Kit

Deborah Clegg, PhD

9:30 – 10:30 a.m.

Flash Talk from Participants and Receive Feedback from Experts

Drs. Gitlin, Jemmott, Gaugler and Clegg

10:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Transition to Virtual Break Out Rooms

10:45 – 11:45 a.m.

Learning About Different Funding Opportunities

Learn about different funding opportunities, mechanisms
and lessons learned.

  • Laura N. Gitlin, PhD., FGSA, FAAN
  • Joseph E. Gaugler, PhD
  • Carl V. Hill, PhD, MPH
  • Richard Fortinsky, PhD
    Professor, UConn
    Center on Aging, School of Medicine, UConn Health (Affiliate)
  • 11:45 – 12:00 p.m.

    Additional Q&A • Evaluation and Closing Remarks

    Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, FGSA, FAAN
    Distinguished University Professor Dean
    College of Nursing and Health Professions



    For more information contact: ImplementationSci@drexel.edu or call 800-666-7737.