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Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Counseling

Program

The Drexel Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Counseling (BHC) prepares students for careers in mental health and addictions treatment. We offer a competency-based curriculum that addresses the growing need for skilled, direct service providers. BHC graduates are effective and caring professionals who contribute to the healing and well-being of people in recovery, families, and communities.

Our mission is rooted in the core values of service, compassion, initiative, respect, integrity, competence, and intellectual curiosity. The four-year program includes an optional six-month co-op, described in the curriculum section, and is designed for the full-time undergraduate student.

The College of Nursing and Health Professions is located at Drexel University's Center City Health Sciences campus, home to the Clinical Learning Resource Center. This center features a state-of-the-art standardized patient lab which facilitates student acquisition of counseling skills through structured interactions with actors simulating people in need of mental health or addictions treatment.

What you’ll learn

The focus of student learning in this major is on how to do a broad range of evidence-based practices associated with individual and group counseling, person-centered assessment and treatment planning, psychiatric rehabilitation, recovery-oriented treatment of substance-use disorders, child and family-focused interventions and other essential clinical skills in demand by behavioral health care employers.

Students select courses that reflect individual interests and that meet a variety of pre-professional development needs. High achieving students earn Certificates of Advanced Study that signal specialized knowledge and skill in specific areas of behavioral health counseling.

This unique major offers opportunities for on-the-job learning experiences through selected co-op placements or community service arrangements. Co-op students in the Behavioral Health Counseling major have enjoyed work experiences in a variety of behavioral health settings such as psycho-social rehabilitation centers, addictions treatment clinics, inpatient and partial hospitalization settings, children’s treatment services and related facilities.

What makes the Drexel Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Counseling program unique?

  • Our faculty members are known for their research and clinical practice experience in the Greater Philadelphia region.
  • Skills-based co-operative employment experiences enhance the program with real-world knowledge application.
  • You are part of the Drexel College of Nursing and Health Professions with access to stimulating learning environments and interdisciplinary health care scenarios.
  • Our advanced, skills-based curriculum and innovative hands-on training far exceeds that found at most other undergraduate colleges and universities.  

Career Opportunities

Students confidently enter the workforce immediately upon graduation or go on to graduate school, in areas such as social work, counseling, or psychology, knowing that the quality of their education is well-recognized by leading universities throughout the United States.

Graduates easily find employment in behavioral health settings because they are widely acknowledged by the region's employers as being among the best prepared job applicants. This is particularly noteworthy given the increased employer demand for well-trained behavioral health care professionals.  Graduates typically find immediate employment in areas such as:

  • Psychiatric rehabilitation
  • Family and child support services
  • Addictions counseling
  • Case management and services coordination
  • Individual and group counseling
  • Forensic mental health services
  • Crisis intervention

The behavioral healthcare field is tremendously diverse and encompasses far more career opportunities than listed. Career choices exist at all levels of service—from direct care to administration and policy-making. Students will find tremendous benefit both in the employment listings and outreach offered by Drexel's Steinbright Career Development Center and in the diverse professional career experience our faculty brings to our students.

 

Admissions

For Entering Freshmen

To review admission prerequisites, visit the Admission Prerequisites page. 

To find admissions deadlines, apply online, check out financial aid information, and find the current schedule for open houses, visit the Undergraduate Admissions site.

For Transferring Students

Our transfer policies are specifically designed to accommodate students applying from other colleges. Transfer students may enter the program at any point and transfer a maximum of 90 semester credits (135 quarter credits). The courses and credit values show how many general education credits can be transferred in at the discretion of the program. (Please note: This program is offered in quarter credits, not semester credits. One semester credit is equal to 1.5 quarter credits; therefore, a bachelor's degree worth 120 semester credits is equal to 180 quarter credits.)

To review transfer instructions, visit the Transfer Instructions page.

For International Students

To review transfer instructions, visit the International Instructions page.

Tuition and Fee Rates
Please visit the Tuition and Fee Rates page on Drexel Central

COMPLIANCE

The College of Nursing and Health Professions has a compliance process that may be required for every student. Some of these steps may take significant time to complete. Please plan accordingly.

Visit the Compliance pages for more information.

Curriculum

Behavioral Health Counseling Co-op

Drexel University has long been known for its co-operative education programs, through which students mix periods of full-time, career-related employment with their studies. Co-op employment is a part of the Behavioral Health Counseling curriculum.

Co-operative employment experiences are directed toward activities that will expose students to the various work environments of behavioral health professionals. These work settings provide students with the opportunity to observe mental health and addictions professionals at work, while assessing their own potential and individualized interests in undertaking careers in behavioral health. In the past year Co-op students in the Behavioral Health Counseling major have been selected to work at a psycho-social rehabilitation center, a methadone clinic, and a psychiatric inpatient unit.

The Drexel co-op is paid and unpaid employment selected from a variety of clinical settings that match the interests, abilities, and aptitudes of the student.

For more information about the Drexel Co-op visit the Steinbright Career Development page at http://www.drexel.edu/scdc/

Accreditation

MSA: Accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools

Program Level Outcomes

At Drexel University we believe that a well-formulated set of Program Level Outcomes [PLO] that support and are consistent with the institutional mission and goals are the building blocks of an effective assessment program. 

Click here to view the College of Nursing and Health Professions department of Behavioral Health Counseling Program Level Outcomes.

Career Opportunities

Students confidently enter the workforce immediately upon graduation or go on to graduate school, in areas such as social work, counseling, or psychology, knowing that the quality of their education is well-recognized by leading universities throughout the United States.

Graduates easily find employment in behavioral health settings because they are widely acknowledged by the region's employers as being among the best prepared job applicants. This is particularly noteworthy given the increased employer demand for well-trained behavioral health care professionals.  Graduates typically find immediate employment in areas such as:

  • Psychiatric rehabilitation
  • Family and child support services
  • Addictions counseling
  • Case management and services coordination
  • Individual and group counseling
  • Forensic mental health services
  • Crisis intervention

The behavioral healthcare field is tremendously diverse and encompasses far more career opportunities than listed. Career choices exist at all levels of service—from direct care to administration and policy-making. Students will find tremendous benefit both in the employment listings and outreach offered by Drexel's Steinbright Career Development Center and in the diverse professional career experience our faculty brings to our students. 

News & Events

05/12/20

Graphic depicting Mental Health Month 2020In 1949, it was determined by the Mental Health America Organization that May is Mental Health Awareness month. This is a field, for which, I have found personal and professional gratification. Teaching students to support the living, learning, working and socializing goals of persons with a mental health diagnosis is hugely rewarding. The goal of mental health interventions is to have the individual functioning in the community with the least amount of direct practitioner intervention; our students will graduate into their respective communities, both national and international, with this awareness.

COVID-19 has made behavioral health practitioners even more needed and necessary. Now! During this unprecedented time, we may experience anxiety, depression, and increased stress due to the unfamiliarity of the current state of the Earth. I applaud our behavioral health students focusing on mental health and substance misuse for supporting the community, pre, during and post COVID-19. We applaud you and the faculty educating you for what is important to know to be competent in the field. Mental health attention transforms healthcare around the world and in local communities. Bravo to everyone who has accepted this challenge!

Look for updates and posts in Daily Dose and on CNHP’s social media for resources and information about Mental Health Awareness month.

Veronica Carey, PhD, CPRP
Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
Associate Clinical Professor, Counseling and Family Therapy Department

Chair of the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association

05/06/20

Now is not the time for blame. Now is not the time for pointing the finger at specific communities. For example, individuals of African descent received bias during the Ebola outbreak and the LGBTQIA community experienced discrimination during information sharing about HIV/AIDS. Let’s not continue this behavior with respect to students, faculty and professional staff of Asian decent for the blame of COVID-19. We are at a stage of growth and change, not misaligned culpability and fault.

COVID-19, and the resulting pandemic, has world-wide impact. However, we cannot negate there are local impacts as well. During any type of crisis, underserved populations and communities are the most adversely impacted. An outcome of this pandemic is the creation of communities historically unfamiliar with unemployment, food insecurities and other social injustices. Similarly and as tragic, are behaviors directed at persons in the community who have tested positive for the virus but are able to quarantine at home. Diversity Best Practices just released an article “Implications of COVID-19 and Bias” sharing the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s fear of the degree of stigmatization of persons diagnosed with the coronavirus but survived. This is not a time for shaming or finger pointing, but instead a moment to embrace and celebrate those who have recovered as they re-enter society.

A formula for making a tragic situation worse is to add stigma and fear. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) stigmatized persons are less likely to seek medical treatment when symptomatic due to fear of reprisals and harm. Couple this fear with social isolation and this is a Petri dish for escalation of anxiety, stress and trauma. As such, for CNHP, a community of health professionals and soon to be health professionals, knowledge of what this pandemic can yield is critical for increased awareness of equity and inclusion moving forward in healthcare.

CNHP desires students to learn how to meet the needs of patients, consumers, clients, etc. for post COVID-19 interventions. Students must be prepared to address populations historically not familiar with disparity nor stigma, and at the same time continuing to meet the needs of historically marginalized populations also effected by the pandemic.

Therefore, the Board of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion is suggesting a Call to Arms for all faculty, students and professional staff. If there is stigmatization, shaming, blaming or finger pointing transpiring in classrooms or in the curriculum, call out these infractions, dialogue to correct and move forward. During this time of decentralization of classrooms and professionals it would be easy to ‘overlook’ a statement made online or to disregard a discussion board comment. However, we challenge you to not disregarded these items, but instead use them as catalysts for generating a more informed community of existing and soon to be providers of healthcare both nationally and internationally.

Written by Veronica Carey, PhD, CPRP
Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Chair of the Board of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Resources

Center for Disease Control

World Health Organization (WHO)

04/10/20

The world is in a state of upheaval since the outbreak of the coronavirus. With state and local directives to shelter in place, close non-essential businesses, practice social distancing, move classes online, close college and university campuses and cancel gatherings like annual commencement exercises, hosts of emotions are arising that may be unfamiliar and uncomfortable. Adjusting to this way of life can be difficult and may result in experiencing symptoms associated with anxiety and stress.

Graphic of people sitting classroom styleThe Board of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and department of Counseling and Family Therapy decided to call on their expertise to provide a necessary check-in for students before classes started on April 6. Noting that the normal college experience—going to class with friends, eating in the dining hall, and seeing friends and classmates in person—is changing, Veronica Carey, PhD, the assistant dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and associate clinical professor, organized a virtual mental health event for returning students. “It is important to offer support to students for impact of, not only entering into an unprecedented arena whereby there are decentralized academic operations for the immediate future, but also for fully addressing the effect for many other social locations such as payer of tuition, childcare provider, family member returning home, academic senior dealing with loss of formal graduations, etc.,” remarked Carey.

Screen shot of Ebony White, PhD, during a Zoom event for studentsSoliciting the assistance of fellow Counseling and Family Therapy faculty members, Ebony White, PhD, assistant clinical professor, and Stephanie Ewing, PhD, assistant professor, they provided a forum for learning and discussion and an opportunity to share, from an academic posture, how to balance aspects of life that we know will have impact upon scholastic achievement.

Screen shot of Stephanie Ewing, PhD, during a Zoom event for studentsThis thirty-minute zoom event was well attended and elicited important questions from students and tips from these experts. White lent her expertise around anxiety to the discussion. “I'm just going to focus on issues that may come up and offer strategies and tips to help navigate the less positive type of anxiety,” White noted. Ewing, a licensed clinical psychologist who teaches mostly graduate students will provide ideas for managing disparate obligations at home. “I really want to speak to how to balance competing demands in this really unprecedented time,” Ewing shared.

Screen shot of Veronica Carey, PhD, during a Zoom event for studentsCovering at-home supports, self-distancing without isolating, managing classes, healthy eating, working in high-risk areas and many other topics, these faculty members started something very important. “It is frightening, frustrating and sad,” acknowledged Carey. “And yet, at CNHP, we are all somehow trained and involved in healthcare-related fields. We continue to teach, learn and serve in these fields in the midst of this current reality,” she furthered. Because of the loss of life and threat to life has resulted in other losses including social engagement, physical contact, and a disruption to school, work, and home, it is important to know these signs, identify effective coping skills, and have resources to refer to if more support is needed. “Let’s come together to think and discuss ways that we can try to help ourselves and those we work with, live with and care about during these difficult times,” Carey concluded.

Click here to watch the recorded session.

Screen shot of Drexel Counseling Center's contact information

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