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Past Week


  • A person being handcuffed Violent Crime Increases During Warmer Weather, No Matter the Season, Study Finds
    September 25, 2017

    A study analyzing crime data in Philadelphia for 10 years found that rates of violent crime and disorderly conduct are higher when the weather is warmer and more pleasant, even rising sharply during warmer-than-typical winter days.
  • Rosalind Remer, founding executive director of the Lenfest Center for Cultural Partnerships. With $3 Million Gift to Drexel, Lenfest Foundation to Fund Student Co-op Jobs in Cultural Nonprofits
    September 20, 2017

    With a $3 million gift to Drexel University, the Lenfest Foundation will fund paid cooperative education jobs for students in the nonprofit cultural sector. In recognition of this generous gift, the University will name its Center for Cultural Partnerships in honor of Gerry and Marguerite Lenfest. The Center was established in 2015 to fortify cultural institutions like museums, libraries and historical societies and make their offerings and experiences more accessible to Drexel students.

  • nanofibers Spinning a Safer Electrode — Drexel Researchers Make Carbon Nanofiber Supercapacitor (Without The Flammable Ingredients)
    September 20, 2017

    A group of Drexel University researchers have created a fabric-like material electrode that could help make energy storage devices — batteries and supercapacitors — faster and less susceptible to leaks or disastrous meltdowns. Their design for a new supercapacitor, which looks something like a furry sponge infused with gelatin, offers a unique alternative to the flammable electrolyte solution that is a common component in these devices.
  • direct detection electron-loss spectroscopy New Microscope Technology Gives Drexel Researchers a Detailed Look at Structure and Composition of Materials
    September 19, 2017

    At their core, electron microscopes work a lot like a movie projectors. A high-powered beam passes through a material and it projects something — usually something we really want to see — onto a screen on the other side. With most electron microscopes, however, capturing data is like trying to project a movie onto a dirty screen that is too small to see the whole projection. But a new camera technology, developed by researchers at Drexel University, is enabling the microscopes to present a clearer, more complete and detailed look at their featured presentation.