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Personnel

Faculty

Evan Forman

Evan Forman, PhD

Evan Forman received his BA from Cornell University, and his PhD from the University of Rochester. He completed clinical internships and fellowships at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Beck Institute with specialties in cognitive-behavioral therapy, trauma-related disorders and suicidality. Currently he serves as an Associate Professor and Director of the PhD Program in Clinical Psychology. He teaches both undergraduate and graduate psychology courses including Principles of Psychotherapy, Psychotherapy Theories, Advanced Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Abnormal Psychology. His primary research focus concerns the development and evaluation of new acceptance-based behavior treatments for obesity and other health problems, as well as anxiety. Non-psychology interests include running, cycling and traveling.

Email: evan.forman@drexel.edu | Faculty Page | Vita (Google)

James Herbert, Ph.D.

James Herbert, PhD

James D. Herbert, PhD, pursued his undergraduate work at the University of Texas at Austin and liberal arts studies in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. He received his doctorate from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and completed a clinical internship at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. He is Professor and Head of the Department of Psychology, and Director of the Anxiety Treatment and Research Program. He currently teaches an undergraduate course in science and pseudoscience in psychology, and graduate courses in cognitive behavior therapy. His research program focuses on evaluating the effectiveness and mechanisms of action underlying new acceptance-based models of behavior therapy such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), particularly for anxiety disorders, obesity, and eating disorders. He is also studying the remote delivery of these interventions via the Internet. Herbert has published widely on these and other topics in professional journals, and is also well known for his writings on quackery and pseudoscience in mental health. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and the Commission for Scientific Medicine and Mental Health, and serves on the Board of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. He is currently an Associate Editor of The Scientific Review of Mental Health Practice and the Journal of Contextual Behavioral Psychology, and serves on the editorial boards of several additional journals. Avocations include running, martial arts (he is a black belt in Kenpo Karate), cycling, and gardening.

Email: james.herbert@drexel.edu | Faculty Page | Vita (PDF)

Graduate Students

Staci Berkowitz 

Staci Berkowitz

Staci is a fourth year PhD student from New York State. She received her Bachelor's degree from Emory University in 2009. After graduating, she worked as a research assistant at Columbia University Medical Center at New York State Psychiatric Institute. As a graduate student, Staci has been involved with research with individuals with eating and anxiety disorders. Her current research interests include the identification of variables that predict differential response to psychotherapy as well as understanding biological correlates of psychotherapeutic processes. Staci is currently a therapist for the Social Anxiety Treatment Program at Drexel University and a practicum student at the University of Pennsylvania Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety. In her spare time,Staci enjoys being outside, running, trying new restaurants, and spending time with friends.

Lauren Bradley

Lauren Bradley

Lauren is a fifth year PhD student in the Forman-Herbert lab. She is currently on internship at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL. She is from Los Angeles and received her bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania in Biological Basis of Behavior with a minor in Nutrition. Her research interests include acceptance-based therapies for the treatment of obesity and eating disorders. She is particularly interested in the treatment of post-bariatric surgery weight regain. She loves local Philly music, the Lakers and Mexican food.

Laura Fischer

Laura Fischer

Laura is a second year Master's student from Newport, Rhode Island. In 2011, she received her BA from the University of Rhode Island in Psychology and French. After graduating from college, she obtained a two-year clinical research coordinator position in the Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Laura's primary research interests are centered around the development of efficacious treatments for anxiety disorders. In her spare time, Laura enjoys traveling, cooking, drawing, walking, and spending time with friends.

Marina Gershkovich

Marina Gershkovich

Marina is a fifth year PhD student from New York City. She received her bachelor's degree from Cornell University in 2008. After graduation, Marina worked at Columbia University Medical Center at New York State Psychiatric Institute as a research coordinator. Her current research interests include the development and dissemination of Internet-based self-help interventions for anxiety disorders. In addition to being a therapist for the Social Anxiety Treatment Program at Drexel University, she currently works as a staff therapist at Drexel University College of Medicine's Outpatient Psychiatry Service. In her spare time, Marina enjoys museums, painting, and practicing yoga.

Email: marina.gershkovich@drexel.edu

Stephanie Goldstein

Stephanie Goldstein

Stephanie is a second-year doctoral student. She grew up in South Jersey and received her BS from Drexel University. Her research involves the dissemination of evidence-based treatments. More specifically, she is interested in utilizing technology to increase dissemination. In the past, she has worked on projects investigating the feasibility and effectiveness of SecondLife and Skype as treatment modalities. She has also been involved in examining the effectiveness of home-based neurocognitive trainings on changing eating behavior. Currently, she is developing and testing an online, acceptance-based physical activity promotion program for college students. Stephanie loves living in Philly. Her favorite thing about the city is trying new restaurants, but also going to museums and concerts.

Peter Hitchcock

Peter Hitchcock

Pete is a third year PhD student from New Jersey. He received his BA from the University of Miami in 2008. After graduating, he worked as a research assistant in the Georgetown University Center on Health and Education, and as a lab manager in the Brown University Psychiatry department. For his thesis, he is comparing two interventions, mindfulness meditation and self-affirmation, for decreasing defensiveness toward personally relevant threatening health information. He is also interested in whether individuals with psychopathology speak differently than healthy individuals. Pete enjoys meditation, literature, talking broken Spanish, and the Philadelphia coffee shop circuit.

Joanna Kaye 

Joanna Kaye

Joanna is a first year doctoral student from Virginia Beach, VA. She received her BA in Psychology and Spanish from Emory University in 2012. After graduating, Joanna worked as a research coordinator with Emory Psychiatry's Mood and Anxiety Program. There she coordinated a clinical trial of an investigational medicine to treat women with PTSD. Her current research interests include the evaluation of acceptance-based therapies for anxiety disorders. She is interested in the prediction of treatment response and in exploring differential ways of assessing treatment outcomes. Joanna enjoys traveling, exploring neighborhoods, potlucks, and doing anything outdoors.

Lindsay Martin

Lindsay Martin

Lindsay Martin is a fourth year PhD student in the Forman-Herbert lab. She received her Bachelor's in Psychology in 2008 from the University of Nevada, Reno, where she worked as a research assistant in doctoral labs specializing in acceptance-based behavioral interventions. She received her Master's in Clinical Psychology in 2011 from Towson University in Baltimore, Maryland, and while there served as the Data Manager for a multi-site treatment development trial using Acceptance-Based Separated Family Therapy (ASFT) for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Also during her time in Baltimore, she completed clinical and research training at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Eating Disorder Program, where she also served as a research coordinator of a NIMH funded five-site placebo-controlled trial for the use of olanzapine in the treatment of anorexia. Her interests include technique, process, and outcome in acceptance-based behavioral interventions, with a primary concentration in maladaptive eating behaviors, anxiety disorders, and behavioral medicine. In her free time, Lindsay enjoys live music, outdoor activities, basketball, mountains, espresso, and spending time with her close friends and family.

Jena Shaw

Jena Shaw

Jena is a fifth year student in the PhD program. She is currently working in both the Forman-Herbert Lab and the Lowe Lab as her research interests involve the use of acceptance based treatments to improve health behavior change, particularly for weight loss and eating disorders. Her thesis used behavioral outcomes to measure the efficacy of an ACT-based treatment for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in an inpatient setting and her dissertation will focus on the impact of implicit attitudes on eating behavior. Her other interests include rock climbing, traveling, reading, music, running, and freshly baked cookies. She anticipates graduating in 2014.

Email: jas396@drexel.edu

Research Assistants

Stephanie Marando-Blanck 

Stephanie Marando-Blanck

Stephanie joined the Forman-Herbert lab as a Research Assistant in the beginning of September. In May 2014, she graduated from Johns Hopkins University, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, with a Bachelor's in Psychology and Classics. During her Senior year, she interned at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, in the Neurobehavioral Outpatient Unit, which helps to treat problem behaviors such as self injury, aggression, and disruption in children with severe behavioral disorders and/or intellectual disabilities. Before that, she spent a semester in Rome at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies, embracing completely unforgettable views throughout Italy and learning the (unfortunately) not so-unforgettable details of Roman and Ancient Greek history, culture, archaeology, art, and architecture. When not working, she enjoys spending time with her family at their shore house in Ocean City, NJ, practicing the languages with which she was once at least adequate (Italian, Latin, Ancient Greek), folding origami, hiking, and traveling. She plans to apply to graduate programs for Clinical Psychology in the next year (for Fall 2016). In the meantime, she is looking forward to getting her hands on multiple projects within the lab and to investigating the differences of the various extensions of cognitive behavioral therapy, in particular those involving acceptance and mindfulness-based techniques.