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Paige Davis, PhD

Assistant Teaching Professor

Paige Davis, PhD
Office: Stratton 211
Phone: 215.571.4308
Email:

Education

  • B.A., Psychology, The College of William and Mary, 2003
  • M.Sc., Developmental Psychopathology, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom, 2006
  • Ph.D., Developmental Psychopathology, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom, 2011

Research Interests

  • The development of imagination in children

  • Private speech
  • Theory of mind and executive functioning
  • Mental state commentary and mind minded parenting
  • Audio verbal hallucinations


Biography

Paige E. Davis, PhD, is a Developmental Psychopathologist and assistant teaching professor for the department of Psychology at Drexel University. Dr. Davis graduated from The College of William and Mary in Virginia. She received her M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Developmental Psychopathology at Durham University in England.

While completing her Ph.D., Dr. Davis helped to found an elementary school in Cairo, Egypt and acted as their assessment consultant for accreditation. Her current research specializations and interests include child development, the development of imagination, theory of mind, and executive functioning, as well as private speech and mental state talk. Her research on private speech and imaginary companions was recently featured in The Wall Street Journal.


Publications

Davis, P. E., Meins, E., & Fernyhough, C. (2014). Children with imaginary companions focus on mental characteristics when describing their real-life friends. Journal of Infant and Child Development, 23(3), Wiley Online Library early view. doi: 10.1002/icd.1869

Davis, P. E., Meins, E., & Fernyhough, C. (2013). Individual differences in children’s private speech: The role of imaginary companions. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 166, 561-571. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2013.06.10

Davis, P. E., Meins, E., & Fernyhough, C. (2011). Self-knowledge in childhood: Relations with children’s imaginary companions and understanding of mind. British Journal of Developmental Psychology,29, 680-686.doi: 10.1111/j.2044-835X.2011.02038.x