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Upcoming Courses

Tribal Water Rights in the Great Lakes Region 

Travel Dates

September 10-September 18, 2017

Program & Academics

Join the Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry (CII) on a weeklong travel integrated course exploring tribal water rights around the Great Lakes Region.  The struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline is only one of many struggles for water rights among Native American tribes.  The Great Lakes region has a long history of such struggles, including flotilla protests against pipeline construction along the Straights of Mackinac and struggles for fishing rights in state regulated waters.  Through meetings with tribal organizations, resource managers and academics we learn about the history of water rights appropriation in the Great Lakes region, the negotiations for re-securing tribal water rights, successes, failures  and the work  that still need to be done.  Through these meetings we will learn of the cultural importance of water within tribal communities, Native American perspectives on natural resource systems, traditional ecological knowledge and the local and ongoing struggles happening within the broader discourse of tribal water rights. 

This course entails a final project and is worth 1 academic credit applied to the Fall 2017-2018 academic term. Planned activities will include daily class discussions, lectures with local experts and the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, day trips and overnights in the greater Lansing area.


Course objectives

  1. Understand the history of water rights appropriation in the Great Lakes region and the struggles to secure and protect tribal rights
  2. Understand the cultural importance of water and the traditional ecological knowledge surrounding the care and management of water resources to tribes of the Great Lakes region
  3. Identify competing perspectives on water resource management
  4. Critically analyze potential solutions to water resource disputes
  5. Demonstrate the competence to engage with and discuss the issues pertinent to natural resources and tribal rights with people of diverse backgrounds and perspectives

Prerequisites

This trip is open to all University students, but student attendees are required to take at least one of the following 2016-2017 Symposium (Listed as UNIV 241) courses as a pre-requisite to this trip:

  • Fall 2016-2017 – Rivers of Exploration
  • Winter 2016-2017 – Making Space for Water: Incorporating Water in Urban Environments
  • Spring 2016-2017 – Gender, Water, and Developments
  • Summer 2016-2017 – Geopolitics of Water

Alternatively, students that have taken any of the HNRS 302 courses taught by "Symposium 2016-17 Water" faculty fellows including Lloyd Ackert, Julia Novak Colwell, Shannon Marquez, Rick McCourt, or Deb Ruben may use that prerequisite.

Students must have an overall cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher to be considered and must be an actively enrolled Drexel student for the Fall 2017-2018 academic year. 

Cost

  • The Pennoni Honors College will pay for the cost of lodging, two group meals, and any ground transportation AFTER students arrive to Michigan State University from 9/10 through 9/18. Students are responsible for getting themselves to their respective airports after final activities on the 18th.
    • A $75 trip deposit will be associated with this course and will be used towards housing, group meals, and activities.
    • This $75 fee is due on June 15, 2017.
  • Student attendees will be responsible for booking and paying the cost of round trip airfare to and from either of the following two airports:
    • Detroit Airport (DTW)
    • Lansing Airport (LAN)
  • The final destination for students will be the Michigan State University Campus (Exact location TBD) so students are also responsible for ground transportation from their respective arriving airports to and from the university. 

Trip Deposit

All student attendees will be responsible for submitting a non-refundable $75.00 deposit. This deposit is due by Thursday, June 15, 2017 at the Pennoni Honors College main office, 5th Floor of MacAlister Hall. Please request a deposit receipt. Cash or check accepted, make checks out to Pennoni Honors College and write your name in the notes section of the check. 

Application Due Date

Apply Now

The application deadline has been extended. The application is now due by 11:59PM Friday, June 2, 2017.

Application details: Starting on Monday April 24th, student applicants are required fill out a biographical information form and answer the following essay question (500-word maximum):

Why do you want to attend this trip and what do you hope to gain from the experience? 

Tentative Timeline

April 24th                 Applications open

June 2nd                 Applications are due at 11:59PM

June 15th                $75.00 deposit due at the PHC main office

August 31st             Mandatory Trip Logistics Meeting for all attendees

September 10th       Students and staff fly into Michigan

September 18th       Final day of trip activities

Tentative Syllabus

Prerequisite: Must have taken any of the UNIV 241 courses during the 2016-17 academic year; any of the HNRS 302 courses taught by water faculty fellows including Lloyd Ackert, Julia Novak Colwell, Shannon Marquez, Rick McCourt, or Deb Ruben.

Course title: Tribal water rights

Term: Travel integrated course – September 10-18, 2017

Instructor: Julia M. Novak Colwell, Ph.D.

Contact information:

Email: jmc597@drexel.edu
Phone: 215-571-4058
Office: Hagerty L-32

Course description:

This course explores tribal water rights around the Great Lakes Region. The struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline is only one of many struggles for water rights among Native American tribes. The Great Lakes region has a long history of such struggles, including flotilla protests against pipeline construction along the Straights of Mackinac and struggles for fishing rights in state regulated waters. Through meetings with tribal organizations, resource managers and academics we learn about the history of water rights appropriation in the Great Lakes region, the negotiations for re-securing tribal water rights, successes, failures and the work that still need to be done. Through these meetings we will learn of the cultural importance of water within tribal communities, Native American perspectives on natural resource systems, traditional ecological knowledge and the local and ongoing struggles happening within the broader discourse of tribal water rights.

Learning goals:

By the end of this course students will learn to:

  1. Understand the cultural importance of water and the traditional ecological knowledge surrounding the care and management of water resources to tribes of the Great Lakes region
  2. Understand the history of water rights appropriation in the Great Lakes region and the struggles to secure and protect tribal rights
  3. Identify competing perspectives on water resource management
  4. Critically analyze potential solutions to water resource disputes
  5. Demonstrate the competence to engage with and discuss the issues pertinent to natural resources and tribal rights with people of diverse backgrounds and perspectives 

Course materials:

All course readings will be posted on LEARN

Graded assignments and learning activities:

Pre-trip reading and on-site discussion (10 pts)

Students will be responsible for reading a number of articles that give background information on tribal water rights in the Great Lakes Region, traditional ecological knowledge and tribal law and sovereignty. Students should be prepared to discuss the articles and present their main takeaways to the rest of the group on-site the first day of the program.

Daily journal (30 pts)

Each student will be responsible for keeping a daily, reflective journal that will be submitted at the end of the day on the last day of the program. Each day should contain the date, location and speaker/organization that we met with. This is not simply a notebook in which you jot down quick points from lectures (you may want to keep a separate notebook for that, which will help you write your daily journal). The daily reflection should be a coherent narrative of the day’s activities, how they relate to the learning goals of the course. Grading for the journal will be based on thoroughness (accurately and completely includes a reflection of all the day’s activities) and thoughtfulness (i.e. it is clear you applied your brain to thinking through what you experienced that day).

Leader of the Day (10 pts)

Each day a different student will be assigned leadership responsibilities. The student will be briefed the night before about the upcoming activities to be held the following day. The student will be responsible then for briefing the group, giving them background on the person/organization we’ll be meeting with, and making sure they are prepared for the day’s activities. During their leadership day, the student will be responsible for introducing the activities and/or lecturers, keeping the group on time and should be prepared to facilitate an active question/answer session with the speaker/s of the day.

Issue analysis (final deliverable) (30 pts)

Engage with a specific water issue you learned about and develop a set of actionable items that individuals could do to support the Tribes and advance this cause. What are some barriers one might face? What are some bridges to overcome those barriers? What activism has already occurred around this issue and what was the outcome?

Participation and attendance (20 pts)

Your active participation in the course includes being engaged in discussion, asking questions of the speakers, being on time and participating in each group activity. As long as you come to the program with an open, engaged and inquiring mind, you should have no problem achieving full participation.

Grading matrix:

Pre-trip reading and on-site discussion (10%)
Leader of the Day (10%)
Participation and attendance (20%)
Daily journal (30%)
Issue analysis (final deliverable) (30%)

Grading scale:

A: 4.0, A-:3.67

B+: 3.3, B: 3.0, B-: 2.67

C+: 2.33, C: 2.0, C-: 1.67

D+: 1.33, D: 1.0

F: 0.0

Course calendar:

Academic integrity, plagiarism and cheating policy:

http://www.drexel.edu/provost/policies/academic_dishonesty.asp 
http://drexel.edu/studentlife/community_standards/overview/ 

Students with disability statement:

http://drexel.edu/oed/disabilityResources/overview/

Course drop policy:

http://drexel.edu/provost/policies/course_drop/

Course change policy:

This course takes advantage of guest lecturers from university faculty, organizations, government and activists. As such, since we are scheduling humans, unanticipated conflicts or difficulties may arise. You will be notified by email about any course changes, so it is imperative that you monitor your campus email.

Preliminary schedule includes the following activities:

  1. Lectures with Michigan State University professors Kyle Whyte (Philosophy) and Wenona Singal (Law)
  2. Discussions with Frank Ettawageshik from the United Tribes of Michigan and Renee Dillard from the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians
  3. Engagement with the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians including water and fisheries management initiatives, active field research (we will partake in a fish sampling and sample processing event with a tribal fisheries research specialist) and discuss its link to informing tribal fisheries management
  4. Water ceremony with the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians
  5. Field excursion to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore with National Park Service discussion on tribal history and folklore in the region
  6. Panel discussion with State of Michigan, Department of Environmental Quality tribal liaison Jim Goodheart and the Director of the Office of the Great Lakes, Jon Allen