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Research

A collection of different beers.

In Philly, the More Places to Buy Alcohol, the More Violence

Violence increases in areas where there are high densities of stores where alcoholic beverages can be purchased and carried out, according to a new study by Drexel University researchers partnered with the City of Philadelphia.
John Maeda, former president of the Rhode Island School of Design

Drexel’s Learning Innovation Program Launches With Speaker Series

The University’s new initiative aims to find the technologies and methods fueling creative approaches to education. It will feature a series of conversations on learning, a national survey of innovative spaces and pilot programs to put ideas into practice.
photo of Alison Young, Eisenhower Fellow

Drexel’s Alison Young Named Eisenhower Fellow, Will Study Gender Equity of Public Sector in G20 Countries

Drexel University’s Alison Young, executive director of the Institute for Strategic Leadership in the LeBow College of Business, was one of 20 U.S. leaders from government, business and civil society to be selected as a 2017 Eisenhower Fellow. The fellows are some of the leading minds in education policy, consumer protection, agriculture, diplomacy, defense, education, health, media, immigrant integration and public service.

A group of women wearing visors and buttons with red ribbons for HIV awareness.

Must-See-TV: Educational Shows that Entertain Have Greater Impact on Faithful Viewers

A study of viewing audiences shows that the television programs most effective at imparting an educational message about social behaviors are the ones that keep people watching engaged and coming back for more.
sink

Could Low-Flow Create High Risk? EPA Taps Drexel to Study Water Quality Impact of Conservation Practices

As public awareness of the need for water conservation, and new water-saving technology, have become increasingly effective at stemming excess water use, new questions are surfacing about how our plumbing, which was built to handle a regular flow of water, might now be a risk factor for bacterial and chemical contamination. In hopes of preventing future public health crises related to the systems that carry and treat our water, the Environmental Protection Agency is tasking a team of researchers, led by Drexel University, with a $2 million project to bring together existing and new experimental data on building plumbing—the stretch of pipes that takes water from main to tap—into a risk assessment tool that can guide new water use and safety regulations.  

Drexel Revives Interdisciplinary Research Conference, Set for April

The Emerging Graduate Scholars Conference will give students a chance to present their research, discover opportunities for collaboration and sharpen their skills for future national and international conferences.
Rendering of an x-ray baby with a brain inside

Treating Traumatic Brain Injury in Children 

A new study from the College of Medicine shows that a common antibiotic exacerbated cognitive problems in pediatric animal models. 

A Latino couple visiting with a physician.

Study: Obamacare Benefitted Latinos, But Disparities Remain

A new study found that the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, helped improve access and utilization of health care for Latinos, but the benefits varied by heritage group and persistent disparities remain.
An infographic showing the differences in public health voting by region, gender and political party, citing numbers from the story.

Democrat Senators Vote for Public Health Policies 4 Times More Often Than Republicans: Study

Polarization in the Senate was displayed in a recent study that found a 67-percentage- point split between Democrats and Republicans when it comes to voting for public health policies endorsed by the American Public Health Association.
corn

People Aren't The Only Beneficiaries of Power Plant Carbon Standards

When the Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Clean Power Plan in 2015 it exercised its authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions to protect public welfare. The Plan, now the focus of escalating debate, also put the nation on course to meet its goals under the Paris Climate Agreement. Given that other pollutants are emitted from power plants—along with carbon dioxide—research has shown that carbon emission standards for the power sector benefit human health. New research released today shows that they would also benefit crops and trees.
Photo of a person searching on Google

What Do Google Search Queries Reveal About Brand Attitudes?

It has been widely thought that brand search volume — the counts of queries that a search engine receives from users that include specific brand names, like “iPhone” — can predict sales for that brand. Google makes this information available to marketers for free through Google Trends, an application that allows anyone to see how frequently popular brand names are searched, and it has become a valuable tool for marketers. But new research from Drexel University, Brigham Young University and Google shows there is a lot more to consider when looking at the large number of queries that include brand names.

A microscopic image of a tumor cell migrating through collagen.

The Way You Move: Tumor Cells Move Differently Than Normal Ones

A new study by a Drexel biology professor determined that tumor cells can’t move the same way that normal cells do to get through tight squeezes in the body, opening up the potential for future, targeted therapies.