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All News tagged "News Release"

A lit cigarette with smoke wisps

Restaurant, Bar Smoking Bans Impact Smoking Behaviors, Especially for the Highly Educated

Smoking bans in restaurants and bars are especially effective among those with college degrees, but also were associated with higher quit attempts by people with low incomes, according to a new Drexel University study.
The wall separating Tijuana and the United States

Mexican Migrant Health Access Lower After U.S. Border Crossing — And Even When They Return to Mexico

Immigrants and migrants from Mexico had worse access to health care and insurance after they crossed the border into the U.S. — and it remained bad when they returned to Mexico again.
U.S. Census form

Drexel Helps to Establish the Region's First Federal Statistical Research Data Center to Gain Access to Census Data

Researchers from around the city, who are studying public policy and the economy, will have access to some of the nation’s highest quality Census data this coming cycle, thanks to a new federal research center. 
Apoica pallens clustering around their hive.

Little Wasp Bodies Means Little Wasp Brain Regions, Study Shows

A Drexel study looking at 19 species of paper wasps found that body size may lead to variation in the complex parts of their brains.

Drexel's Statement on Resignation of Professor George Ciccariello-Maher

Philly Chef Conference 2018

Drexel’s 2018 Philly Chef Conference Tackles Sexism, Wellness and Business Development
 

Now in its fifth year, the 2018 Philly Chef Conference will once again convene the regional and national food community to discuss the latest food and beverage industry issues and trends with demonstrations on current professional techniques. Experts from coast-to-coast will talk trends in food styling and beverage programs, as well as sexism in the kitchen and wellness for chefs. The conference hosted by Drexel University’s Center for Food and Hospitality Management will take place Sunday through Monday, March 11–12, 2018. 

Brain

Can’t Switch Your Focus? Your Brain Might Not Be Wired for It

A new study from Drexel psychologists suggests that some brains are at a natural advantage to quickly switch their focus from one concept to another.
alchemy

Drexel and Chemical Heritage Foundation Mix Artifacts With Mobile Gaming to Create History of Alchemy Experience

The Chemical Heritage Foundation wants to set the record straight about alchemy. The medieval practice, often perceived as a dark art or pseudoscience, actually helped form the process of scientific experimentation and influenced our modern understanding of chemistry and medicine. On its quest to shed light on alchemy, the Foundation, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, has enlisted help from Gossamer Games, a game design startup in Drexel University’s Entrepreneurial Game Studio, and Frank Lee, PhD, director of the EGS, to create a mobile gaming experience about the “golden age of alchemy” using books, art and artifacts from CHF Museum’s alchemy collection. 
Colored pencils and a half-colored-in image.

Drexel Study: Coloring Books Make You Feel Better, But Real Art Therapy Much More Potent

Many adult coloring books claim to be art therapy and can reduce negative feelings, but art therapists are significantly more impactful, a Drexel study shows.
PrEP pills

The U.S. Could Easily Hit Its 2020 HIV Prevention Goal By Using One Drug, Drexel Study Finds

If just a quarter of high-risk men who have sex with men were to use daily preventive medicine, the United States could surpass its goal of reducing new HIV infections by 25 percent.
photo credit, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Will People Eat Relish Made from ‘Waste’ Ingredients? Drexel Study Finds They May Even Prefer It
 

A new Drexel University study found strong potential for consumer acceptance of a new category of foods created from discarded ingredients.

Drawing of a hand putting a vote in a ballot box

Could Death Rates Have Swung the 2016 Election?

A new study shows that climbing mortality rates of middle-aged white people were associated with many counties voting Republican in the 2016 presidential election.