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All News tagged "chemistry"

third-hand smoke

'Non-Smoking' Doesn't Mean Smoke-Free — Drexel Study Finds Third-Hand Smoke Spreads Inside

Despite decades of indoor smoking bans and restrictions, new research from Drexel University suggests the toxins we’ve been trying to keep out are still finding their way into the air inside. Findings by a group of environmental engineers show that third-hand smoke, the chemical residue from cigarette smoke that attaches to anything and anyone in the vicinity of a smoke cloud, can make its way into the air and circulate through buildings where no one is smoking.
class

How a Group of Honors Students Wrote for Drexel Publications — For a Class

Last term, a class of students in the Pennoni Honors College learned about the inner workings of three different Drexel University publications — and got to contribute to them.
Mario

The Little Engineer That Could

Mario Scotto Di Vetta is using his co-op opportunities to travel around the country and dig up some dirt on his future career opportunities. 

Sci Fest

Science for the Community

Drexel students join with other university students and industry professionals to help promote science among the youth of the Philadelphia area.

Provost Brian Blake with honoree Alison Kenner.

Drexel Honors Outstanding Faculty Achievements at Year-End Awards

At the annual Faculty Recognition Awards Ceremony on May 24, Drexel acknowledged the faculty and staff members whose scholarship, service and teaching contribute so much to the University and its students.
Marcellus Shale gas tower

Methane Levels Have Increased in Marcellus Shale Region Despite a Dip in Well Installation

Despite a slow down in the number of new natural gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region of Northeast Pennsylvania, new research led by Drexel University finds that atmospheric methane levels in the area are still increasing. Measurements of methane and other air pollutants taken three years apart in the rural areas of Pennsylvania that have been the target of natural gas development over the last decade, revealed a substantial increase from 2012 to 2015.
bulk photovoltaic effect

Making a Solar Energy Conversion Breakthrough With Help From a Ferroelectrics Pioneer

Designers of solar cells may soon be setting their sights higher, as a discovery by a team of researchers has revealed a class of materials that could be better at converting sunlight into energy than those currently being used in solar arrays. Their research shows how a material can be used to extract power from a small portion of the sunlight spectrum with a conversion efficiency that is above its theoretical maximum — a value called the Shockley-Queisser limit. This finding, which could lead to more power-efficient solar cells, was seeded in a near-half-century old discovery by Russian physicist Vladimir M. Fridkin, PhD, a visiting professor of physics at Drexel University, who is also known as one of the innovators behind the photocopier. 
Marcellus Shale region

Drexel Researchers First to Detect Air Quality Effects of Natural Gas Extraction in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale Region

A team led by environmental engineers from Drexel University are the first independent researchers to take a closer look at the air quality effects of natural gas extraction in the Marcellus Shale region of Pennsylvania. The group used a mobile air quality monitoring vehicle to survey regional air quality and pollutant emissions at 13 sites including wells, drilling rigs, compressor stations and processing areas. Their work establishes baseline measurements for this relatively new area of extraction.