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All News tagged "science"

Drexel's New iPad App Teaches Physics Concepts Using Artifacts at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

“Physics at the Art Museum” is a new iPad app that teaches users about the physics behind art works in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The  mobile iPad app is now available for download, free of charge, from Apple’s App Store. It will also be available through the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s website, www.philamuseum.org.
Academy scientists and a Drexel student collect algae and examine the rocks and water depth in Manatawny Creek as part of the Delaware Watershed Conservation Program. Photo Credit: John Strickler/The Mercury

Academy Gets $3.2M Grant to Protect Drinking Water

The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University will coordinate and oversee ecological monitoring projects by more than 40 national and regional environmental organizations in eight designated geographic areas in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Delaware.

Carol Collier Joins Academy of Natural Sciences as Senior Advisor for Watershed Management and Policy

Carol R. Collier, an experienced leader in regional watershed management and planning, has joined the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University as its Senior Advisor for Watershed Management and Policy. Collier recently retired as Executive Director of the Delaware River Basin Commission, a position she held for more than 15 years.
The two partial limb fossils from the ancient sea turtle <i>Atlantochelys mortoni</i> fit together perfectly, leaving little room for doubt that they are from the same bone. This discovery surprised paleontologists because the two halves were discovered at least 163 years apart, defying conventional wisdom that most fossils break down after weeks or months of surface exposure.

Two Fossils From Same Bone, Discovered 162 Years Apart, Fit Together 'Like Puzzle Pieces'

To the surprise of paleontologists from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University and the New Jersey State Museum, two halves of a turtle bone, discovered 162 years apart, fit together perfectly. The discovery provides new insight into one of the largest turtle species that ever lived.

Neil deGrasse Tyson

Will the New 'Cosmos' Draw More People to Science? A Q&A With Dave Goldberg

When astronomer Carl Sagan’s series “Cosmos: A Personal Voyage” first aired, it instilled a love of science in people like Dave Goldberg. Can the rebooted version hosted by Neil DeGrasse Tyson do the same?

Virtual navigation screen

Drexel Prof's Discovery of 'Brain's Own GPS' Named One of 2013's Top 100 Science Stories

Joshua Jacobs used to study computers, but they weren’t quite complex enough for his taste. So he moved on to examining a much more complicated instrument: the human brain.

Fossil Find Shows Fish Hips Grew Strong Before Life's First Steps

The discovery of new fossil materials from the ancient fish species Tiktaalik roseae has revealed a key link in the evolution of hind limbs. The newly described, well-preserved pelves and partial pelvic fin from this 375 million-year-old transitional species between fish and the first legged animals, reveals that the evolution of hind legs actually began as enhanced hind fins, contrary to the existing theory that large hind legs developed after vertebrates transitioned to land.

GPS Traffic Maps for Leatherback Turtles Show Hotspots to Prevent Accidental Fishing Deaths

The leatherback turtle in the Pacific Ocean is one of the most endangered animals in the world. Its population has declined by more than 90 percent since 1980. One of the greatest sources of mortality is industrial longlines that set thousands of hooks in the ocean to catch fish, but sometimes catch sea turtles as well. Using modern GPS technology, researchers are now able to predict where fisheries and turtles will interact and to reduce the unwanted capture of turtles by fishermen.

Paperwasps in Different Castes Develop Different-Sized Sensory Brain Structures

A queen in a paperwasp colony largely stays in the dark. The worker wasps, who fly outside to seek food and building materials, see much more of the world around them. A new study led by Drexel professor Sean O'Donnell, PhD, indicates that the brain regions involved in sensory perception also develop differently in these castes, according to the different behavioral reliance on the senses.
Stephen C. Lawrence (left), chairman of the Lacawac Sanctuary Foundation, and George W. Gephart, Jr., president and CEO of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, shake hands over an agreement to form an environmental research and educational consortium at Lacawac in the Pocono Mountains. The consortium also includes Drexel University.

Environmental Research Consortium Formed with Lacawac Sanctuary, Drexel and Academy of Natural Sciences

Lacawac Sanctuary Foundation, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University and Drexel University today announced an agreement to form an environmental research and education consortium at Lacawac Sanctuary, a popular National Natural Landmark and ecological field research station in the Pocono Mountains.
Animatronic T. rex

Dinosaurs come to life in new Academy exhibit

Roaring, thrashing, life-size dinosaurs and the awe-inspiring stories of prehistoric earth are unfolding at the as Dinosaurs Unearthed makes its East Coast debut at the Academy of Natural Sciences.

Foreground: Dr. Tracy Quirk uses a Surface Elevation Table (SET) to measure relative sediment elevation change in a salt marsh in Barnegat Bay, NJ while staff scientist Linda Zaoudeh records data. Background: Staff scientist Stephanie Leach and Drexel environmental science graduate student Viktoria Unger use Real Time Kinematic (RTK) satellite navigation with GPS technology to measure the elevation of the marsh.

Drexel Scientist Studies Hurricane Sandy Impact on NJ Coastal Wetlands One Year Later

In a stroke of good luck, Drexel's Dr. Tracy Quirk captured detailed measurements of water level and salinity at a range of coastal wetland sites, even as they were overtaken by Hurricane Sandy. After the storm, she began working on an intensive year-long project, funded by the National Science Foundation, to evaluate ecosystem processes in New Jersey’s salt marshes before, during, and for a year following Hurricane Sandy. Quirk is beginning to analyze findings from the study now.