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All News tagged "science"

Provost Brian Blake with honoree Alison Kenner.

Drexel Honors Outstanding Faculty Achievements at Year-End Awards

At the annual Faculty Recognition Awards Ceremony on May 24, Drexel acknowledged the faculty and staff members whose scholarship, service and teaching contribute so much to the University and its students.
Philadelphia School Partnership presented a $1.2 million grant to Drexel University to launch a residency-based teacher certification program called Dragons Teach Middle Years (DTMY).

Drexel Launches “Dragons Teach Middle Years” Teacher Training Program 
 

Supported by a $1.2 million grant from the Philadelphia School Partnership (PSP), Drexel University’s School of Education will create a new pipeline of dual-certified, Middle-Years teachers, trained specifically for the challenges of Philadelphia classrooms. 

A measuring tape wrapped around a fork

The Science of Eating Disorders

For National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, professors Adrienne Juarascio and Jessica Barson separate fact from fiction and weigh in on the psychological and physiological causes of eating disorders.
A depiction of black holes merging and the gravitational waves that emit from them.

Building Toward Discovery: Drexel Professor’s Role in Finding Gravitational Waves

Sometimes, science is about chipping away at the big questions. One Drexel physics professor recently got credit for his role in developing a big answer.
The LSST in its facility building with the night sky. Courtesy of the LSST Corporation.

Drexel Professor to Use New Telescope to Map Beyond Milky Way

Due to his past involvement with another survey of the night sky, Drexel’s Gordon Richards will take a look out of our galaxy with the help of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which is capable of mapping the entire night sky every three days.
One of the world's earliest geological maps was recently pulled from the Academy Archives and put on display for visitors, but only for a few days as it is quite delicate and rare.

The World Underfoot

Eighteenth-century land surveyor William Smith was a rock star. And we mean that quite literally — Smith’s 1815 map of England, Wales and part of Scotland was the world’s first look at the organization of the earth beneath our feet. Less than 200 copies of this seminal work exist today and the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University owns one of them.
President Fry on a field that includes the Chinese and South Korean flags.

Drexel Delegation Off to China, Korea

President John A. Fry and a group of Drexel colleagues will make stops at academic partners in China and take part in a celebration of a new research and co-op partnership in Korea that gives students access to cutting-edge research and nanotechnology.
Layered lava flows of the Deccan Traps east of Mumbai, India. Photo by Mark Richards.

Did Asteroid Impact or Volcanic Eruption Kill the Dinosaurs? Probably Both, Says New Study

Was it an asteroid impact on Earth 66 million years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs? Or the eruption of volcanoes in India for hundreds of thousands of years? For decades, paleontologists and geologists have debated the role these two global events played in the last mass extinction. But compelling new evidence supports the hypothesis of a group of geoscientists: that the asteroid’s impact ignited volcanoes around the globe, most catastrophically in India, and that, together, these planet-wide catastrophes caused the extinction of many land and marine animals, including the dinosaurs.

BBPP research staff, Illidio Mebulo, collecting a sample of primate tissue in the market for genetic analysis. Credit: Javier Rivas/BBPP

Where Commerce and Conservation Clash: Bushmeat Trade Grows with Economic Prosperity in 13-Year Study

The bushmeat market in the city of Malabo is bustling—more so today than it was nearly two decades ago, when Gail Hearn, PhD, began what is now one of the region’s longest continuously running studies of commercial hunting activity.  Hearn’s team has now published its comprehensive results of 13 years of daily monitoring bushmeat market activity.

brain images show reduced cortical surface area and increased cortical thickness in Down Syndrome

Thick Cortex Could Be Key in Down Syndrome

The thickness of the brain’s cerebral cortex could be a key to unlocking answers about intellectual development in youth with Down Syndrome, according to a new study led by a Drexel psychologist.

wasp colony

Do Insect Societies Share Brain Power?

A new Drexel study suggests that social behavior evolved very differently in the brains of social insects than in vertebrate animals such as mammals, birds and fish.

swarm of army ants

Underground Ants Can't Take the Heat

A new Drexel study shows underground species of army ants are much less tolerant of high temperatures than their aboveground relatives—and that could mean  climate change models lack a key element of how animal physiology could affect responses to changing environments.