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All News tagged "research"

Injured soccer play holds knee on field.

Youth Soccer Coaches Can Prevent Injuries

A study from sports medicine experts shows that properly trained coaches can be as effective as professionals when it comes to preventing injuries.
syringe and vials

‘Who Needs a Flu Shot? – Not Me’
 

“There has been a little flu, but there will be more…we have not seen the worst of it, flu usually peaks in February,” said an article in The Philadelphia Inquirer in January. Now in February, we think – people better get their flu shots, take vitamin C and heed the public health cautions plastered across the news media. But what impact do these public health messages actually have on us? Are we going to race out and get our flu shot? According to a Drexel University communication researcher, probably not. And it’s not because we think we’re invincible, it’s because we like to think we’re immune to the influences of messages in the mass media — a communications theory termed the “third-person effect.”
faculty

Applications Welcome for 2017 Drexel Research, Scholarship and Creativity Awards

The Office of Research and Office of Faculty Affairs recently announced $1.2 million worth of new funding opportunities for Drexel faculty and staff.
A warning sign saying "This is a smoke free building."

Smoke-Free Policy Cuts Nicotine Detected in Philadelphia Public Housing in Half: Study

The largest public housing authority to implement comprehensive smoke-free policies, the Philadelphia Housing Authority, is seeing significant positive results related to secondhand smoke exposures.
A collection of different beers.

In Philly, the More Places to Buy Alcohol, the More Violence

Violence increases in areas where there are high densities of stores where alcoholic beverages can be purchased and carried out, according to a new study by Drexel University researchers partnered with the City of Philadelphia.
A group of women wearing visors and buttons with red ribbons for HIV awareness.

Must-See-TV: Educational Shows that Entertain Have Greater Impact on Faithful Viewers

A study of viewing audiences shows that the television programs most effective at imparting an educational message about social behaviors are the ones that keep people watching engaged and coming back for more.

Drexel Revives Interdisciplinary Research Conference, Set for April

The Emerging Graduate Scholars Conference will give students a chance to present their research, discover opportunities for collaboration and sharpen their skills for future national and international conferences.
Rendering of an x-ray baby with a brain inside

Treating Traumatic Brain Injury in Children 

A new study from the College of Medicine shows that a common antibiotic exacerbated cognitive problems in pediatric animal models. 

A Latino couple visiting with a physician.

Study: Obamacare Benefitted Latinos, But Disparities Remain

A new study found that the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, helped improve access and utilization of health care for Latinos, but the benefits varied by heritage group and persistent disparities remain.
An infographic showing the differences in public health voting by region, gender and political party, citing numbers from the story.

Democrat Senators Vote for Public Health Policies 4 Times More Often Than Republicans: Study

Polarization in the Senate was displayed in a recent study that found a 67-percentage- point split between Democrats and Republicans when it comes to voting for public health policies endorsed by the American Public Health Association.
Skyline over top of a row home neighborhood.

As Neighborhood Status Falls, Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among Black Residents Spikes

A Drexel University-led study found that significant increases in cardiovascular disease was linked to black residents of neighborhood with lower socioeconomic status and higher levels of violence and disorder.
A microscopic image of a tumor cell migrating through collagen.

The Way You Move: Tumor Cells Move Differently Than Normal Ones

A new study by a Drexel biology professor determined that tumor cells can’t move the same way that normal cells do to get through tight squeezes in the body, opening up the potential for future, targeted therapies.