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All News tagged "materials science"

smoke detector

A High(er)-Definition Nose — Drexel's MXene Material Could Improve Sensors That Sniff

Sensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person’s breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best “chemical noses” even more sensitive.
hydrogen fuel

'Chemical Net' Could Be Key to Capturing Pure Hydrogen

Hydrogen is one of the most abundant elements on Earth and an exceptionally clean fuel source. While it is making its way into the fuel cells of electric cars, busses and heavy equipment, its widespread use is hampered by the expensive gas-separation process required to produce pure hydrogen. But that process could soon become more efficient and cost-effective thanks to a discovery by an international team of researchers, led in the U.S. by Drexel University. The group has uncovered exceptionally efficient gas separation properties in a nanomaterial called MXene that could be incorporated into the membranes used to purify hydrogen.
direct detection electron-loss spectroscopy

New Microscope Technology Gives Drexel Researchers a Detailed Look at Structure and Composition of Materials

At their core, electron microscopes work a lot like a movie projectors. A high-powered beam passes through a material and it projects something — usually something we really want to see — onto a screen on the other side. With most electron microscopes, however, capturing data is like trying to project a movie onto a dirty screen that is too small to see the whole projection. But a new camera technology, developed by researchers at Drexel University, is enabling the microscopes to present a clearer, more complete and detailed look at their featured presentation.
packed subway

Just Squeeze In — Drexel Researchers Discover When Spaces Are Tight, Nature Loosens Its Laws

It turns out that when they’re in a hurry and space is limited, ions, like people, will find a way to cram in — even if that means defying nature’s norms. Recently published research from an international team of scientists, including Drexel University’s Yury Gogotsi, PhD, shows that the charged particles will actually forgo their “opposites attract” behavior, called Coulombic ordering, when confined in the tiny pores of a nanomaterial. This discovery could be a pivotal development for energy storage, water treatment and alternative energy production technologies, which all involve ions packing into nanoporous materials. 

lithium dendrites

Recipe for Safer Batteries — Just Add Diamonds

While lithium-ion batteries, widely used in mobile devices from cell phones to laptops, have one of the longest lifespans of commercial batteries today, they also have been behind a number of recent meltdowns and fires due to short-circuiting in mobile devices. In hopes of preventing more of these hazardous malfunctions researchers at Drexel University have developed a recipe that can turn electrolyte solution — a key component of most batteries — into a safeguard against the chemical process that leads to battery-related disasters. 
battery charging

Entering the Fast Lane — MXene Electrodes Push Charging Rate Limits in Energy Storage

Can you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers in Drexel University’s College of Engineering can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design in the journal Nature Energy
Katie Van Aken

A Drexel University PhD Reflects on Five Years in the Lab and on the Board

Katie Van Aken, vice president of the Graduate Student Association, turned her dissertation defense into a celebration earlier this month, and she’s currently preparing to speak at the biggest one of all for students — commencement. 
From left to right: Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs M. Brian Blake, PhD; Yury Gogotsi, PhD, the newly installed Charles T. and Ruth M. Bach Professor in the College of Engineering; and Giuseppe R. Palmese, PhD, interim dean and professor in the College of Engineering.

Nanomaterials Researcher Yury Gogotsi Receives $2.2M Endowed Professorship

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, the founder and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was installed May 1 as the inaugural Charles T. and Ruth M. Bach Professor at Drexel University.
Drexel nanomaterials researchers in a South Korean lab.

Drexel's Materials Researchers Building Connections in Korea

The first chapter in a South Korean collaboration proved fruitful for Drexel's nanomaterials researchers, who learned that it takes big thinking to make progress on the smallest of scales.
MXene film

Containing Our 'Electromagnetic Pollution'

If you’ve ever heard your engine rev through your radio while listening to an AM station in your car, or had your television make a buzzing sound when your cell phone is near it, then you’ve experienced electromagnetic interference. This phenomenon, caused by radio waves, can originate from anything that creates, carries or uses an electric current, including television and internet cables, and, of course cell phones and computers. A group of researchers at Drexel University and the Korea Institute of Science & Technology is working on cleaning up this electromagnetic pollution by containing the emissions with a thin coating of a nanomaterial called MXene.