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All News tagged "materials engineering"

One child had the opportunity to touch and feel a real-life dinosaur fossil at the Academy of Natural Sciences during Drexel's Inspire a Child to Dream event.

Little Dragons Inspired to Dream — and Create, and Play — at Annual Event

At 2018’s annual Inspire a Child to Dream Day, the children of Drexel faculty and staff came to campus for a special day of activities.
Getting up close and personal with the animal armor of an armadillo with the Academy of Natural Sciences at Philly Materials Day 2018.

Building Connections at Philly Materials Science & Engineering Day

Each year, Drexel University hosts Philly Materials Science & Engineering Day to engage local K-12 students in a day of workshops and hands-on demonstrations related to materials science and engineering.

  Back row, left to right: Dean Cohen, Amy Gottsegen, Kelly Weissberger (Associate Director, CSD), Ashleigh Jugan, Nicholas Barber, Vincent O’Leary, Provost Blake, Riki McDaniel, Ian Nichols, Caitlin Walczyk, Sam Buczek, Meredith Wooten (Director, CSD), Dean Van Bockstaele, Martha Meiers (Program Coordinator, CSD). Front row, left to right: Caitlin Cooper, Ana Monastero, Jacob Baron, Dylan O’Donoghue, Marina D’souza, Gabrielle Salib, Emily Coyle (Fellowships Advisor, CSD). Photo credit Jordan Stein.

Meet the Drexel Dragons up for the Biggest Awards This Year

Drexel University’s Center for Scholar Development recently hosted an event to recognize the hard work and initiative taken by those students who applied for major fellowships this year.
hydrogen fuel

'Chemical Net' Could Be Key to Capturing Pure Hydrogen

Hydrogen is one of the most abundant elements on Earth and an exceptionally clean fuel source. While it is making its way into the fuel cells of electric cars, busses and heavy equipment, its widespread use is hampered by the expensive gas-separation process required to produce pure hydrogen. But that process could soon become more efficient and cost-effective thanks to a discovery by an international team of researchers, led in the U.S. by Drexel University. The group has uncovered exceptionally efficient gas separation properties in a nanomaterial called MXene that could be incorporated into the membranes used to purify hydrogen.
Katie Van Aken

A Drexel University PhD Reflects on Five Years in the Lab and on the Board

Katie Van Aken, vice president of the Graduate Student Association, turned her dissertation defense into a celebration earlier this month, and she’s currently preparing to speak at the biggest one of all for students — commencement. 
From left to right: Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs M. Brian Blake, PhD; Yury Gogotsi, PhD, the newly installed Charles T. and Ruth M. Bach Professor in the College of Engineering; and Giuseppe R. Palmese, PhD, interim dean and professor in the College of Engineering.

Nanomaterials Researcher Yury Gogotsi Receives $2.2M Endowed Professorship

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, the founder and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was installed May 1 as the inaugural Charles T. and Ruth M. Bach Professor at Drexel University.
Heard Around Campus

Heard Around Campus – May

With Commencement right around the corner, May is time for getting deserved recognition and finishing up lingering projects before the heat of summer kicks in.
Boron nitride aerogel

Drexel Materials Scientists Aid Australian Institution in Developing Super-Absorbent Material That Can Soak Up Oil Spills

In hopes of limiting the disastrous environmental effects of massive oil spills, Materials scientists from Drexel University and Deakin University, in Australia, have teamed up to manufacture and test a new material, called a boron nitride nanosheet, that can absorb up to 33 times its weight in oils and organic solvents—a trait that could make it an important technology for quickly mitigating these costly accidents. 
KAIST

Drexel Establishes Co-op Research Center With Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

Quality materials, reliable tools and talented artisan are the key ingredients of any successful workshop. When it comes to making electronics components and energy storage devices, discoveries emerge when new materials are used in advanced fabrication techniques. Students from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology will soon be in the presence of both. A co-op partnership with Korea’s National Research Foundation will give the students a chance to apply their talents in the nanofabrication center frequented by companies like Samsung and Hyundai, using the latest nanomaterials developed by Drexel’s materials scientists.

Drexel researchers have created layered MXene materials by using acid to etch a MAX phase block containing molybdenum.

Drexel Engineers' Recipe For 'Sandwiching' Atomic Layers Expands Possibilities For Making Materials That Store Energy

The scientists whose job it is to test the limits of what nature—specifically chemistry— will allow to exist, just set up shop on some new real estate on the Periodic Table. Using a method they invented for joining disparate elemental layers into a stable material with uniform, predictable properties, Drexel University researchers are testing an array of new combinations that may vastly expand the options available to create faster, smaller, more efficient energy storage, advanced electronics and wear-resistant materials. 
binary

Putting a New Spin on Computing Memory

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks and laps, their central processing has functioned something like an atomic Etch A Sketch, with electromagnetic fields pushing data bits into place to encode data. Unfortunately, the same drawbacks and perils of the mechanical sketch board have been just as pervasive in computing: making a change often requires starting from the beginning, and dropping the device could wipe out the memory altogether. As computers continue to shrink—moving from desks and laps to hands and wrists—memory has to become smaller, stable and more energy conscious. A group of researchers from Drexel University’s College of Engineering is trying to do just that with help from a new class of materials, whose magnetism can essentially be controlled by the flick of a switch.
capacitive yarn

Holding Energy By The Threads

A Drexel doctorate student is leading the charge on researching conductive yarns that have the flexibility of a cotton T-shirt but the energy storage that would make the Energizer Bunny proud.