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All News tagged "energy"

nanofibers

Drexel Researchers Make a Carbon Nanofiber Supercapacitor (Without The Flammable Ingredients)

A group of Drexel University researchers have created a fabric-like material electrode that could help make energy storage devices — batteries and supercapacitors — faster and less susceptible to leaks or disastrous meltdowns. Their design for a new supercapacitor, which looks something like a furry sponge infused with gelatin, offers a unique alternative to the flammable electrolyte solution that is a common component in these devices.
battery charging

Entering the Fast Lane — MXene Electrodes Push Charging Rate Limits in Energy Storage

Can you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers in Drexel University’s College of Engineering can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design in the journal Nature Energy
corn

People Aren't The Only Beneficiaries of Power Plant Carbon Standards

When the Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Clean Power Plan in 2015 it exercised its authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions to protect public welfare. The Plan, now the focus of escalating debate, also put the nation on course to meet its goals under the Paris Climate Agreement. Given that other pollutants are emitted from power plants—along with carbon dioxide—research has shown that carbon emission standards for the power sector benefit human health. New research released today shows that they would also benefit crops and trees.
bulk photovoltaic effect

Making a Solar Energy Conversion Breakthrough With Help From a Ferroelectrics Pioneer

Designers of solar cells may soon be setting their sights higher, as a discovery by a team of researchers has revealed a class of materials that could be better at converting sunlight into energy than those currently being used in solar arrays. Their research shows how a material can be used to extract power from a small portion of the sunlight spectrum with a conversion efficiency that is above its theoretical maximum — a value called the Shockley-Queisser limit. This finding, which could lead to more power-efficient solar cells, was seeded in a near-half-century old discovery by Russian physicist Vladimir M. Fridkin, PhD, a visiting professor of physics at Drexel University, who is also known as one of the innovators behind the photocopier. 
salt

Adding Some Salt to the Recipe For Energy Storage Materials

A team of researchers from Drexel University, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) and Tsinghua University recently discovered a way to improve the recipe and make the resulting materials bigger and better and soaking up energy — the secret? Just add salt. 

Drexel faculty (from left) Longjian Liu, Carol Collier and Franco Montalto were among the eight participants who traveled to Paris, France to represent Drexel at the 2015 COP21 conference.

Drexel Talks Climate Change

Drexel’s participation in the annual United Nations Conference on Climate Change in December empowered eight Drexel faculty, staff and students. Each came away with a different, rewarding experience that they’ll share at a public event next month.

Philadelphia power plant

A.J. Drexel Institute for Energy and the Environment Plots a Course for Philadelphia to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Researchers from the A.J. Drexel Institute for Energy and the Environment issued a 97-page report to the City of Philadelphia that plots a detailed course for how the city can reduce its emission of greenhouse gasses—with the goal of an 80 percent reduction by the year 2050. Among its suggestions are retrofitting hospitals, grocery stores, schools and retail stores with better windows and insulation; drawing electricity from low-carbon sources like nuclear, wind and solar power; and encouraging the use of electric vehicles, public transportation, walking and cycling.
Drexel researchers have created layered MXene materials by using acid to etch a MAX phase block containing molybdenum.

Drexel Engineers' Recipe For 'Sandwiching' Atomic Layers Expands Possibilities For Making Materials That Store Energy

The scientists whose job it is to test the limits of what nature—specifically chemistry— will allow to exist, just set up shop on some new real estate on the Periodic Table. Using a method they invented for joining disparate elemental layers into a stable material with uniform, predictable properties, Drexel University researchers are testing an array of new combinations that may vastly expand the options available to create faster, smaller, more efficient energy storage, advanced electronics and wear-resistant materials. 
power plant

DoE Taps Drexel to Reduce Water Use in Power Plant Cooling

Recent drought conditions in California have focused attention on the nation’s need to protect its water supply. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy is looking for a better way to cool off some of the country’s 7,304 power plants—99 percent of which are water-cooled. With DoE support, researchers from the College of Engineer are developing technology that can cool plants with wax instead of water.
capacitive yarn

Holding Energy By The Threads

A Drexel doctorate student is leading the charge on researching conductive yarns that have the flexibility of a cotton T-shirt but the energy storage that would make the Energizer Bunny proud.