For a better experience, click the Compatibility Mode icon above to turn off Compatibility Mode, which is only for viewing older websites.

tags

All News tagged "biology"

Red-eared monkey. Photo by Ian Nichols/National Geographic.

Gun Hunting Could Lead to Extinction of Threatened Primates on African Island

A study conducted by a team led by Drexel University scientists found that gun hunting on Bioko Island correlates significantly with lower numbers of the majority of the island’s primate species.
Images of three different synapses. Photos by Mitchell D'Rozario.

Double Duty: Proteins Associated with Schizophrenia Hang Around Longer Than Previously Thought

While most scientists believe that TCF4 proteins degraded and disappeared after they assigned jobs to cells in the nervous system, a Drexel University research team discovered that the proteins were hanging around afterward and telling the cells how to do those jobs.
The Central African Biodiversity Alliance 2015 Undergraduate Field Course Plant Research Group at Mbam & Djerem National Park, Cameroon. Pictured from left to right: Katie DiAngelus (Drexel), Katherine Achy (UCLA), Dr. Maximilliano Fero (National University of Equatorial Guinea), Francisco Mitogo (National University of Equatorial Guinea), Andrienne Bih (Univeristy of Buea, Cameroon) and Alexandra Ley (University of Halle-Wittenberg, Germany). Photo credit: David Montgomery.

African Biodiversity Researchers to Speak at Drexel Before National Symposium

A group of biodiversity researchers from Drexel-managed programs in Central Africa will speak at the University to discuss the challenges of their work and preparing for the future before they attend the Association for the Advancement of Science symposium.
Specimens from that were contributed to the Academy's collection by clergy during the museum's early days. They include a bushbaby, giant snail, beetle, turtle and bird.

Academy Exhibit Highlights Clergy’s Contributions to Science

An exhibit at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University is highlighting the intertwined role of science and the clergy at the museum’s beginning.
CloneView

Drexel's Image-Tracking Technology Allows Scientists to Observe Nature vs. Nurture in Neural Stem Cells

One of the longstanding debates in science, that has, perhaps unsurprisingly, permeated into the field of stem cell research, is the question of nature versus nurture influencing development. Science on stem cells thus far, has suggested that, as one side of the existential debate holds: their fate is not predestined. But new research from the Neural Stem Cell Institute and Drexel University's College of Engineering suggests that the cells’ tabula might not be as rasa as we have been led to believe.
BBPP research staff, Illidio Mebulo, collecting a sample of primate tissue in the market for genetic analysis. Credit: Javier Rivas/BBPP

Where Commerce and Conservation Clash: Bushmeat Trade Grows with Economic Prosperity in 13-Year Study

The bushmeat market in the city of Malabo is bustling—more so today than it was nearly two decades ago, when Gail Hearn, PhD, began what is now one of the region’s longest continuously running studies of commercial hunting activity.  Hearn’s team has now published its comprehensive results of 13 years of daily monitoring bushmeat market activity.

wasp colony

Do Insect Societies Share Brain Power?

A new Drexel study suggests that social behavior evolved very differently in the brains of social insects than in vertebrate animals such as mammals, birds and fish.

swarm of army ants

Underground Ants Can't Take the Heat

A new Drexel study shows underground species of army ants are much less tolerant of high temperatures than their aboveground relatives—and that could mean  climate change models lack a key element of how animal physiology could affect responses to changing environments.
Teacher naturalist Caitlin Halligan at Academy of Natural Sciences' making a face as she presents on a skunk's scent to a group of children.

Learning from the 'Grossness' of Animals

Let’s face it: Animals can be gross. But what can we learn from some of the things that we find disgusting or weird? A new exhibit at the Academy of Natural Sciences shows us.
African Pygmy Kingfisher (Ispidina picta) photographed in Vwaza Wildlife Reserve, Malawi. Credit: Jason D. Weckstein

Study of African Birds Reveals Hotbed of Malaria Parasite Diversity

A new study published this week in the journal PLOS ONE explores the scope of malaria parasite diversity in southeast African birds, and provides insight into how lifestyle characteristics of birds can influence their association with different parasite genera.
A Nigeria-Cameroon chimp rescued from illegal animal trafficking who now lives at the Limbe Wildlife Center in Cameroon. Credit Paul Sesink Clee

Studies of Africa's Most Endangered Chimpanzees Show Complex Evolutionary Past, Perilous Future

A Drexel-led team's complementary analyses of population genetics, geographical distribution and habitat use paint a new picture of the evolutionary past and potentially bleak future of the Nigeria-Cameroon Chimpanzee, already the most endangered chimp subspecies.

Drexel Team Unveils Supermassive Dinosaur Dreadnoughtus

A Drexel-led team has described a new dinosaur species with the most complete skeleton ever found of one of the largest animals to ever walk the Earth. At 85 feet (26 m) long and weighing about 65 tons (59,300 kg) in life, Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which a body mass can be accurately calculated.