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All News tagged "biology"

Zak Brodnik in the lab

Zak Brodnik Wants to Change How You Think About Addiction

As a doctoral candidate in neuroscience in the Drexel University College of Medicine, Zak Brodnik’s work focuses on the biology underlying drug-use disorders, and he has a message he wants to deliver alongside his research.
Provost Brian Blake with honoree Alison Kenner.

Drexel Honors Outstanding Faculty Achievements at Year-End Awards

At the annual Faculty Recognition Awards Ceremony on May 24, Drexel acknowledged the faculty and staff members whose scholarship, service and teaching contribute so much to the University and its students.
A fruit fly standing on an evergreen branch

Common Artificial Sweetener Likely a Safe, Effective Birth Control, Pesticide for Insects, Drexel Study Finds

Erythritol, a non-nutritive sweetener found in products like Truvia, has proven effective in killing fly larvae and slowing down their egg production, making it a good candidate for human and pet-safe pesticide use.
A dyed green image of a fibers in a human hippocampus

Treatment Window for Fragile X Likely Doesn’t Close After Childhood, Drexel Study Finds

A Drexel University-led study looked into human and rat brain samples and found that the biological structures potentially contributing to Fragile X syndrome are present in adult brains — something that mouse samples did not show.
A microscopic image of a tumor cell migrating through collagen.

The Way You Move: Tumor Cells Move Differently Than Normal Ones

A new study by a Drexel biology professor determined that tumor cells can’t move the same way that normal cells do to get through tight squeezes in the body, opening up the potential for future, targeted therapies.
Fibroblasts

Sleeping Cells’ Survival Instincts: A Double-Edged Sword?

For researchers who study aging, a central riddle remains: If the human body has evolved to protect itself, why are cells unable to cope with the challenges associated with getting old?
Senior Vice Provost for Research Aleister Saunders.

Q&A With Senior Vice Provost for Research Aleister Saunders

University research typically is a fairly insular endeavor, played out at the department level with little cross-pollination among the various disciplines. Senior Vice Provost for Research Aleister Saunders is trying to widen that view. He has been advocating a university-wide approach to research, looking for those areas where Drexel can support and encourage investigations that cut across departments and disciplines.
Labidus Praedator. Photo by Dinesh Rao.

Mountaineering Ants Use Body Heat to Warm Nests

Underground army ants can keep their nests — called bivouacs — warm with their body heat; this social warming may enable fragile offspring to survive in chilly mountain forests , according to Drexel University researchers.
A fruit fly on a compost pile. Photo by John Tann.

Ladykiller: Artificial Sweetener Proves Deadly for Female Flies

In testing multiple artificial sweeteners, a Drexel University research team found that one was particularly deadly for female fruit flies — and left males relatively untouched.
A giant panda cooling off with a block of ice. Photo by Mingxi Li.

Pandas Don’t Like It Hot: Temperature, Not Food is Biggest Concern for Conservation

China’s bamboo supply is more than enough to support giant pandas after it was discovered that they have bigger appetites than originally believed, but climate change could destroy their plentiful food source anyway.
This year's co-op award winners are pictured. Bottom row left to right: Lynn Gotuaco, Conchita Taylor, Chau Dang, Angelique Giannascoli and Sarah Griggs. Back row left to right: Sandra Petri, Arvid Roach and Brandon Katz.

Celebrating the Best of Drexel’s Historic Co-op Program in 2016

Drexel’s annual Cooperative Education Awards honored outstanding co-op students and employers alike.
Red-eared monkey. Photo by Ian Nichols/National Geographic.

Gun Hunting Could Lead to Extinction of Threatened Primates on African Island

A study conducted by a team led by Drexel University scientists found that gun hunting on Bioko Island correlates significantly with lower numbers of the majority of the island’s primate species.