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All News tagged "College of Engineering"

Drexel student Nick Philips during his Disney co-op

Riding the Rails During a Disney Co-op

A Drexel engineering student spent months with roller coasters and theme park rides — and set a career path in the process.  

Edwin E.L. Gerber, PhD, pictured when he was 17 in 1952 and when he received Drexel's Harold Myers Service Award in 2013. Photos courtesy Edwin E.L. Gerber, PhD.

Drexel Memories From the Professor Who Has Been Here for Six Decades

Edwin E.L. Gerber, PhD, professor in the College of Engineering, discusses what it’s been like at Drexel during the 63 years he’s been on campus.
ripplocation

Drexel Researchers Use Layered Metals to Show How Nature's 'Dislocations' Occur

Every material can bend and break. Through nearly a century’s worth of research, scientists have had a pretty good understanding of how and why. But, according to new findings from Drexel University materials science and engineering researchers, our understanding of how layered materials succumb to stresses and strains was lacking. The report suggests that, when compressed, layered materials — everything from sedimentary rocks, to beyond-whisker-thin graphite — will form a series of internal buckles, or ripples, as they deform.
MXene film

Containing Our 'Electromagnetic Pollution'

If you’ve ever heard your engine rev through your radio while listening to an AM station in your car, or had your television make a buzzing sound when your cell phone is near it, then you’ve experienced electromagnetic interference. This phenomenon, caused by radio waves, can originate from anything that creates, carries or uses an electric current, including television and internet cables, and, of course cell phones and computers. A group of researchers at Drexel University and the Korea Institute of Science & Technology is working on cleaning up this electromagnetic pollution by containing the emissions with a thin coating of a nanomaterial called MXene.

Heard Around Campus

Heard Around Campus – August

In this last Heard Around Campus before the start of the new academic year, take a moment to reflect on all that has been accomplished this past year and what will be celebrated in the future.
Pictured left to right: President John A. Fry, Dean Joe Hughes, Alexander Fridman, Christel Nyheim and John Nyheim.

A. J. Drexel Plasma Institute Renamed the C. & J. Nyheim Plasma Institute

Thanks to a generous donation from John and Christel Nyheim, the A. J. Drexel Plasma Institute is now known as the C. & J. Nyheim Plasma Institute.
dancers

Building Drones to Dance – David Parsons’ Choreography Brings Human and Robot Inspired Dynamics to Philadelphia

The Federal Aviation Administration has counted nearly 325,000 registered drone operators as of Feb. 8, 2016 – although this number represents only a fraction of the unmanned aerial vehicles currently at the fingertips of humans. According to the FAA, the average drone operator owns one and a half drones, putting the number of flying robots closer to half a million…but how many of these drones will dance? 

Steve Kaspryzk '05, third from right, is the latest Drexel Dragon to compete in multiple Olympics and Paralympics.

A Celebrated History of Drexel Olympians and Paralympians

A Drexel alum is currently in Rio for his second Summer Olympics, thus becoming the most recent in a line of Drexel Dragons who have repeatedly competed in the Olympic and Paralympic games.    
bulk photovoltaic effect

Making a Solar Energy Conversion Breakthrough With Help From a Ferroelectrics Pioneer

Designers of solar cells may soon be setting their sights higher, as a discovery by a team of researchers has revealed a class of materials that could be better at converting sunlight into energy than those currently being used in solar arrays. Their research shows how a material can be used to extract power from a small portion of the sunlight spectrum with a conversion efficiency that is above its theoretical maximum — a value called the Shockley-Queisser limit. This finding, which could lead to more power-efficient solar cells, was seeded in a near-half-century old discovery by Russian physicist Vladimir M. Fridkin, PhD, a visiting professor of physics at Drexel University, who is also known as one of the innovators behind the photocopier. 
microswimmers

Drexel's Microswimmer Robots Can Work Together — And Apart

Drexel University researchers, led by MinJun Kim, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, have successfully pulled off a feat that both sci-fi fans and Michael Phelps could appreciate. Using a rotating magnetic field they show how multiple chains of microscopic magnetic bead-based robots can link up to reach impressive speeds swimming through a liquid. Their finding is the latest step toward using the so-called “microswimmers” to deliver medicine and perform surgery inside the body.

Heard Around Campus

Heard Around Campus – July

Even with the heat waves and scorching temperatures, a lot has been accomplished and changed at Drexel over the past month. Take a look at what’s been heard around campus (hopefully, with an iced drink on your desk) and catch up on all the happenings at Drexel.
The Top 100 list of worldwide universities granted patents released by The National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association.

Drexel in the Top 50 of Worldwide List for Patents

Drexel was named 49th on a list of worldwide universities granted patents released by The National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association, placing amidst some of the biggest names in innovation.