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All News tagged "College of Engineering"

Students participate in a demonstration during last year's Philly Materials Day.

At Philly Materials Day, Drexel Aims to Inspire

The seventh annual event, set for Feb. 4 in the Bossone Research Enterprise Center, will offer visitors hands-on demonstrations and workshops to stimulate curiosity about materials science and engineering.
sink

Could Low-Flow Create High Risk? EPA Taps Drexel to Study Water Quality Impact of Conservation Practices

As public awareness of the need for water conservation, and new water-saving technology, have become increasingly effective at stemming excess water use, new questions are surfacing about how our plumbing, which was built to handle a regular flow of water, might now be a risk factor for bacterial and chemical contamination. In hopes of preventing future public health crises related to the systems that carry and treat our water, the Environmental Protection Agency is tasking a team of researchers, led by Drexel University, with a $2 million project to bring together existing and new experimental data on building plumbing—the stretch of pipes that takes water from main to tap—into a risk assessment tool that can guide new water use and safety regulations.  
cyber defense

Drexel Team Eyes Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition

Drexel University is preparing to field its first intercollegiate team in cybersecurity. A dozen students have been in training since the summer, coached by professionals from Susquehanna International Group, LLC, to ready themselves for the Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition—a national contest that pits students against hackers and a variety of digital dilemmas they might face in the cybersecurity field. Drexel and SIG are partnering to enter a team in the competition for the first time. 
corn

People Aren't The Only Beneficiaries of Power Plant Carbon Standards

When the Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Clean Power Plan in 2015 it exercised its authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions to protect public welfare. The Plan, now the focus of escalating debate, also put the nation on course to meet its goals under the Paris Climate Agreement. Given that other pollutants are emitted from power plants—along with carbon dioxide—research has shown that carbon emission standards for the power sector benefit human health. New research released today shows that they would also benefit crops and trees.
top stories

Top Drexel Stories of 2016

Relive the moments and exciting headlines that sparked the most conversation and interest during 2016 through this annual review of the year’s top Drexel stories.
Drexel nanomaterials researchers in a South Korean lab.

Drexel's Materials Researchers Building Connections in Korea

The first chapter in a South Korean collaboration proved fruitful for Drexel's nanomaterials researchers, who learned that it takes big thinking to make progress on the smallest of scales.
climate change

Urban Climate Change Research Hub Opens at Drexel

In the battle to adapt to and mitigate climate change caused by humans, most environmental engineers and climate scientists agree that cities are the front line. Due to the sheer density of their population, and the quantity of resources they consume, cities have the potential to most quickly and significantly affect—and be affected by—climate risks. They also have the ability to integrate climate resiliency into their plans for the future, according to environmental engineering professor Franco Montalto, PhD, who will direct a network of North American climate change researchers concerting their efforts via a new hub at Drexel University. 
Drexel student Nick Philips during his Disney co-op

Riding the Rails During a Disney Co-op

A Drexel engineering student spent months with roller coasters and theme park rides — and set a career path in the process.  

Edwin E.L. Gerber, PhD, pictured when he was 17 in 1952 and when he received Drexel's Harold Myers Service Award in 2013. Photos courtesy Edwin E.L. Gerber, PhD.

Drexel Memories From the Professor Who Has Been Here for Six Decades

Edwin E.L. Gerber, PhD, professor in the College of Engineering, discusses what it’s been like at Drexel during the 63 years he’s been on campus.
ripplocation

Drexel Researchers Use Layered Metals to Show How Nature's 'Dislocations' Occur

Every material can bend and break. Through nearly a century’s worth of research, scientists have had a pretty good understanding of how and why. But, according to new findings from Drexel University materials science and engineering researchers, our understanding of how layered materials succumb to stresses and strains was lacking. The report suggests that, when compressed, layered materials — everything from sedimentary rocks, to beyond-whisker-thin graphite — will form a series of internal buckles, or ripples, as they deform.
MXene film

Containing Our 'Electromagnetic Pollution'

If you’ve ever heard your engine rev through your radio while listening to an AM station in your car, or had your television make a buzzing sound when your cell phone is near it, then you’ve experienced electromagnetic interference. This phenomenon, caused by radio waves, can originate from anything that creates, carries or uses an electric current, including television and internet cables, and, of course cell phones and computers. A group of researchers at Drexel University and the Korea Institute of Science & Technology is working on cleaning up this electromagnetic pollution by containing the emissions with a thin coating of a nanomaterial called MXene.

Heard Around Campus

Heard Around Campus – August

In this last Heard Around Campus before the start of the new academic year, take a moment to reflect on all that has been accomplished this past year and what will be celebrated in the future.