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All News tagged "News"

crystalsome

Drexel's Polymer Pill Proves it Can Deliver

Selecting the right packaging to get precious cargo from point A to point B can be a daunting task at the post office. For some time, scientists have wrestled with a similar set of questions when packaging medicine for delivery in the bloodstream: How much packing will keep it safe? Is it the right packing material? Is it too big? Is it too heavy? Researchers from Drexel University have developed a new type of container that seems to be the perfect fit for making the delivery.
Fossil Fuels

Report: Fossil Fuel Industries - The Goliath of Climate-Related Lobbying Efforts, Spent Billions

A new study by Drexel environmental sociologist Robert J. Brulle, PhDshows that between 2000 and 2016, lobbyists spent more than two billion dollars on influencing relevant legislation in the US Congress. As the first peer-reviewed, comprehensive analysis ever conducted of climate lobbying data, Brulle’s research confirms the spending of environmental groups and the renewable energy sector was eclipsed by the spending of the electrical utilities, fossil fuel, and transportation sectors.

Drexel STEM Students Will Earn Teacher Certification Through New $1.2 Million Grant

More Drexel University undergraduate students will have the opportunity to earn teacher certification in science and mathematics thanks to the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Scholarship program, which recently awarded Drexel’s School of Education a 5-year, $1.2 million grant. The new grant will allow 24 Drexel students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in a major related to science, technology, engineering or mathematics to earn pre-service teacher certification in middle grades (4-8) science or mathematics through Drexel’s DragonsTeach Middle Years program.

ceramic materials

A Strength Supplement For Aerospace Materials

In an exciting development for the field of aerospace engineering, the lightweight materials of airplanes and rockets might soon be getting stronger. A new method for making ceramic materials — which are used in propellers and heat shields — has enabled the introduction of chemical compounds to bolster their strength and could also imbue them with other useful properties. The discovery was recently reported by researchers at Drexel University and Penn State University.

Credit: Emily Cheng

Player-Only Villages on College Campuses Could Hinder Student Development

“If you build it, they will come” seems to be the mantra of top football programs around the country that have invested in the creation of exclusive player-only villages. Coaches are behind the concept of the “Athletic Village,” believing it will enhance the togetherness of their team. However, researchers are raising caution to the exclusivity of these compounds – which may support the further segregation of athletes from the campus population that can cause significant social and personal drawbacks.

chiller

Drexel's Scale-Fighting Force Field Protects Air Conditioning Systems From Mineral Deposition

Mineral deposition or scaling, is a naturally occurring phenomenon at the root of a number of problems that could menace water-cooled HVAC systems. Drexel University Professor Young Cho, PhD, who has studied the problem for decades, invented a device that can generate an electric field to ward off scaling in systems of all sizes.
With dance performances taking place in nearly every corner, the Barnes museum will seemingly come alive. © JJ Tiziou Photography

Experience Philadelphia Museum of Dance; A Day of Living Art and Social Interaction at the Barnes Foundation

Philadelphia Museum of Dance is a day-long public performance that will take place at the Barnes Foundation on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018 from 3 - 9 p.m. A free exhibit of live dance, Philadelphia Museum of Dance will explore the tension between public and private experiences, while offering a new opportunity to engage with how dance and visual art are exhibited.
Drexel Fashion '18

Advanced Textiles and Elegant Designs Will Captivate the Runway at Drexel’s Annual Fashion Show

Studio 54, Rocky Horror Picture Show, 19th century circuses, and botanicals in urban environments are the inspiration for a handful of student designers whose collections will be featured in Fashion ’18, Drexel University's annual fashion show, presented on Saturday, June 2 by the Fashion Design and Design & Merchandising programs in the Westphal College of Media Arts & Design.

snake skin

What Can Snakes Teach Us About Engineering Friction?

If you want to know how to make a sneaker with better traction in the rain, just ask a snake. That’s the theory driving the research of

Hisham Abdel-Aal, PhD, an associate teaching professor in Drexel University’s College of Engineering who is studying snake skin to help engineers improve the design of textured surfaces, such as engine cylinder liners, prosthetic joints — and yes, maybe even footwear.

MXene soft assembly

A Soft Solution to the Hard Problem of Energy Storage

Recently published research from Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania, shows a new technique for manipulating two-dimensional materials that allows them to be shaped into films of a practically usable thickness, while maintaining the properties that make them exceptional candidates for use in supercapacitor electrodes. 

 
Students learning

Drexel Teacher Residents Will Earn a Salary While Working Towards Certification in Philadelphia District Schools

Drexel University’s School of Education is partnering with the School District of Philadelphia to support Drexel’s Philadelphia Teacher Residency program, which will provide salaries, benefits and scholarships to aspiring STEM teachers.

third-hand smoke

'Non-Smoking' Doesn't Mean Smoke-Free — Drexel Study Finds Third-Hand Smoke Spreads Inside

Despite decades of indoor smoking bans and restrictions, new research from Drexel University suggests the toxins we’ve been trying to keep out are still finding their way into the air inside. Findings by a group of environmental engineers show that third-hand smoke, the chemical residue from cigarette smoke that attaches to anything and anyone in the vicinity of a smoke cloud, can make its way into the air and circulate through buildings where no one is smoking.