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All News tagged "engineering"

power plant

DoE Taps Drexel to Reduce Water Use in Power Plant Cooling

Recent drought conditions in California have focused attention on the nation’s need to protect its water supply. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy is looking for a better way to cool off some of the country’s 7,304 power plants—99 percent of which are water-cooled. With DoE support, researchers from the College of Engineer are developing technology that can cool plants with wax instead of water.
Marcellus Shale region

Drexel Researchers First to Detect Air Quality Effects of Natural Gas Extraction in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale Region

A team led by environmental engineers from Drexel University are the first independent researchers to take a closer look at the air quality effects of natural gas extraction in the Marcellus Shale region of Pennsylvania. The group used a mobile air quality monitoring vehicle to survey regional air quality and pollutant emissions at 13 sites including wells, drilling rigs, compressor stations and processing areas. Their work establishes baseline measurements for this relatively new area of extraction.
Ex3, standing for "Explore, Explain and Experience," a suite of Engineering courses available to all University undergraduate students.

Engineering To Offer Courses for ‘Renaissance People’

To supplement the education of all Drexel students with technical learning, the College of Engineering put together a full slate of courses open to all University undergraduates.
binary

Putting a New Spin on Computing Memory

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks and laps, their central processing has functioned something like an atomic Etch A Sketch, with electromagnetic fields pushing data bits into place to encode data. Unfortunately, the same drawbacks and perils of the mechanical sketch board have been just as pervasive in computing: making a change often requires starting from the beginning, and dropping the device could wipe out the memory altogether. As computers continue to shrink—moving from desks and laps to hands and wrists—memory has to become smaller, stable and more energy conscious. A group of researchers from Drexel University’s College of Engineering is trying to do just that with help from a new class of materials, whose magnetism can essentially be controlled by the flick of a switch.
nanoboiling

Using Viruses To Help Water Blow Off Steam

Legions of viruses that infect the leaves of tobacco plants could be the key to making power plants safer, heating and cooling of buildings more efficient, and electronics more powerful. These tiny protein bundles, which were once a threat to a staple cash crop of the nascent United States in the 1800s, are now helping researchers like Drexel University’s Matthew McCarthy, PhD, better understand and enhance the processes of boiling and condensation.
Peter Grice.

Co-op Experience Set Course for Drexel Grad’s 45-Year Career

Fifty years ago, Pete Grice was sure he knew exactly what he wanted to do, but with the help of a co-op through Drexel, he discovered his perfect career.
twinning

Researchers Take a Closer Look at How a Material’s Behavior Changes as it Gets Smaller

To fully understand how nanomaterials behave, one must also understand the atomic-scale deformation mechanisms that determine their structure and, therefore, their strength and function. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, Drexel University and Georgia Tech have engineered a new way to observe and study these mechanisms and, in doing so, have revealed an interesting phenomenon in a well-known material, tungsten. The group is the first to observe atomic-level deformation twinning in body-centered cubic (BCC) tungsten nanocrystals.
Ellen Kullman, right, poses with the Engineering Leader of the Year Award and Drexel President John Fry. Photo by David Gehosky.

DuPont CEO Accepts Drexel Engineering Award

Ellen Kullman, the CEO of DuPont and chairwoman of its board of directors, was named Drexel’s 2015 Engineering Leader of the Year.
Wan Shih, PhD, a biomedical engineering professor recently granted a fellowship in the National Academy of Inventors

Curiosity Fuels Drexel Professor’s Prolific Inventing

Professor Wan Shih’s curiosity has turned into a prolific inventing career in which almost 30 patents are attached to her name, resulting in a fellowship with the National Academy of Inventors.
A student working at Dragon Hacks 2015.

Drexel Hosts, Wins Hardware Hackathon

Hosting a hackathon that utilized hardware instead of the usual software, a Drexel team using innovative controls for a drone rose above the rest.
Ellen Kullman

DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman Named Drexel's 2015 Engineering Leader of the Year

Drexel University’s College of Engineering will honor Ellen Kullman, chair of the Board and CEO of DuPont, as its 2015 Engineering Leader of the Year. Kullman, who will be recognized at a ceremony on Feb. 23, will join an esteemed group of engineering trailblazers who have received the award. 

A group of Drexel students are designing a transportation concept for Sydney, Australia as part of Disney's Imaginations contest.

Disney Internship at Stake in Design Contest

Campfire stories, high-speed trains and out-of-body experiences are all part of Drexel University students’ plan in an Imagineering contest for a Disney-themed transportation system of the future set in Sydney, Australia.