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All News tagged "engineering"

ultraviolet light

A Molecular Light Switch?...Just Add Water

A bit of stray moisture during an experiment tipped off scientists about the strange behavior of a complex oxide material they were studying—shedding light on its potential for improving chemical sensors, computing and information storage. In the presence of a water molecule on its surface, the layered material emits ultraviolet light from its interior. A team of researchers from Drexel University, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California at Berkeley, and Temple University recently published its discovery that it is possible to control UV light production via a chemical reaction that functions like flipping a light switch.
office

Do You Think Before You Breathe? Drexel Survey Finds Broad Misperceptions About Impact of Cleaner Indoor Air

Do you know how easy it is to improve the quality of the air you breathe every day?  Or how much indoor air quality affects your health and productivity?  If you’re not sure, you’re not alone. According to a recent survey by a group of Drexel University environmental and architectural engineering researchers, there is quite a bit of confusion about the costs and benefits of indoor air quality improvement—even among building owners, designers, managers and tenants.

Boron nitride aerogel

Drexel Materials Scientists Aid Australian Institution in Developing Super-Absorbent Material That Can Soak Up Oil Spills

In hopes of limiting the disastrous environmental effects of massive oil spills, Materials scientists from Drexel University and Deakin University, in Australia, have teamed up to manufacture and test a new material, called a boron nitride nanosheet, that can absorb up to 33 times its weight in oils and organic solvents—a trait that could make it an important technology for quickly mitigating these costly accidents. 
Philadelphia power plant

A.J. Drexel Institute for Energy and the Environment Plots a Course for Philadelphia to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Researchers from the A.J. Drexel Institute for Energy and the Environment issued a 97-page report to the City of Philadelphia that plots a detailed course for how the city can reduce its emission of greenhouse gasses—with the goal of an 80 percent reduction by the year 2050. Among its suggestions are retrofitting hospitals, grocery stores, schools and retail stores with better windows and insulation; drawing electricity from low-carbon sources like nuclear, wind and solar power; and encouraging the use of electric vehicles, public transportation, walking and cycling.
KAIST

Drexel Establishes Co-op Research Center With Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

Quality materials, reliable tools and talented artisan are the key ingredients of any successful workshop. When it comes to making electronics components and energy storage devices, discoveries emerge when new materials are used in advanced fabrication techniques. Students from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology will soon be in the presence of both. A co-op partnership with Korea’s National Research Foundation will give the students a chance to apply their talents in the nanofabrication center frequented by companies like Samsung and Hyundai, using the latest nanomaterials developed by Drexel’s materials scientists.

rooftop HVAC

Diagnosing 'Sick' Buildings to Save Energy

Are you feeling too cold right now? Too warm? Is your office's air a little stale today? On average, Americans spend 90 percent of the day indoors, in a controlled environment. Controlling that environment, at least in the workplace, is the Sisyphean labor of building operators. “Operating” a building requires not only striking the perfect balance between heating, cooling and ventilation, but also repairing and maintaining all of the equipment and systems that allow this magical equilibrium to exist. Endlessly pushing a boulder up a hill might actually be less work. As part of a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, researchers from Drexel University are working on a cloud-based data analysis tool that could help consolidate these labors while also spotting undetected problems that lead to wasted energy and poor indoor environmental quality.
CloneView

Drexel's Image-Tracking Technology Allows Scientists to Observe Nature vs. Nurture in Neural Stem Cells

One of the longstanding debates in science, that has, perhaps unsurprisingly, permeated into the field of stem cell research, is the question of nature versus nurture influencing development. Science on stem cells thus far, has suggested that, as one side of the existential debate holds: their fate is not predestined. But new research from the Neural Stem Cell Institute and Drexel University's College of Engineering suggests that the cells’ tabula might not be as rasa as we have been led to believe.
Drexel researchers have created layered MXene materials by using acid to etch a MAX phase block containing molybdenum.

Drexel Engineers' Recipe For 'Sandwiching' Atomic Layers Expands Possibilities For Making Materials That Store Energy

The scientists whose job it is to test the limits of what nature—specifically chemistry— will allow to exist, just set up shop on some new real estate on the Periodic Table. Using a method they invented for joining disparate elemental layers into a stable material with uniform, predictable properties, Drexel University researchers are testing an array of new combinations that may vastly expand the options available to create faster, smaller, more efficient energy storage, advanced electronics and wear-resistant materials. 
PeaceTech Lab

Engineering Peace: Drexel Joins PeaceTech Lab in Global Mission to Use Technology for Resolving Conflicts

Drexel University engineering researchers and students are joining an international effort led by PeaceTech Lab, a non-profit entity launched by the United States Institute of Peace (USIP), to prepare the next generation of humanitarian engineers. The PeaceTech Lab’s Young Engineers Program seeks to use the skills of talented young technologists in service of communities in conflict zones around the world who are seeking to create a sustainable peace. 
Kapil Dandekar

Drexel Antenna Research Hits the Market in ’Smart' Product

Wireless antenna technology that originated in the College of Engineering has hit the market in the newest family of ZyXEL ’smart attennae’ designed to seek a better wireless connection.
achiral microswimmer robot

Microscale 'Transformer' Robots Joining Forces to Clear Blocked Arteries

Swarms of microscopic, magnetic, robotic beads could be scrubbing in next to the world’s top vascular surgeons—all taking aim at blocked arteries.
power plant

DoE Taps Drexel to Reduce Water Use in Power Plant Cooling

Recent drought conditions in California have focused attention on the nation’s need to protect its water supply. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy is looking for a better way to cool off some of the country’s 7,304 power plants—99 percent of which are water-cooled. With DoE support, researchers from the College of Engineer are developing technology that can cool plants with wax instead of water.