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All News tagged "engineering"

Drexel's new steel teaching tool.

Meet Drexel’s New 10-Foot-Tall Teaching Tool

The steel teaching sculpture installed outside the Bossone Research Enterprise Center contains all of the members and connections found on any steel building, giving engineering students a hands-on way to visualize what they learn in class.
nanofibers

Drexel Researchers Make a Carbon Nanofiber Supercapacitor (Without The Flammable Ingredients)

A group of Drexel University researchers have created a fabric-like material electrode that could help make energy storage devices — batteries and supercapacitors — faster and less susceptible to leaks or disastrous meltdowns. Their design for a new supercapacitor, which looks something like a furry sponge infused with gelatin, offers a unique alternative to the flammable electrolyte solution that is a common component in these devices.
direct detection electron-loss spectroscopy

New Microscope Technology Gives Drexel Researchers a Detailed Look at Structure and Composition of Materials

At their core, electron microscopes work a lot like a movie projectors. A high-powered beam passes through a material and it projects something — usually something we really want to see — onto a screen on the other side. With most electron microscopes, however, capturing data is like trying to project a movie onto a dirty screen that is too small to see the whole projection. But a new camera technology, developed by researchers at Drexel University, is enabling the microscopes to present a clearer, more complete and detailed look at their featured presentation.
packed subway

Just Squeeze In — Drexel Researchers Discover When Spaces Are Tight, Nature Loosens Its Laws

It turns out that when they’re in a hurry and space is limited, ions, like people, will find a way to cram in — even if that means defying nature’s norms. Recently published research from an international team of scientists, including Drexel University’s Yury Gogotsi, PhD, shows that the charged particles will actually forgo their “opposites attract” behavior, called Coulombic ordering, when confined in the tiny pores of a nanomaterial. This discovery could be a pivotal development for energy storage, water treatment and alternative energy production technologies, which all involve ions packing into nanoporous materials. 

lithium dendrites

Recipe for Safer Batteries — Just Add Diamonds

While lithium-ion batteries, widely used in mobile devices from cell phones to laptops, have one of the longest lifespans of commercial batteries today, they also have been behind a number of recent meltdowns and fires due to short-circuiting in mobile devices. In hopes of preventing more of these hazardous malfunctions researchers at Drexel University have developed a recipe that can turn electrolyte solution — a key component of most batteries — into a safeguard against the chemical process that leads to battery-related disasters. 
Peace Engineering

Teaching Engineers How to Build Peace

Drexel and PeaceTech Lab, a nonprofit organization headquartered at the U.S. Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C., have created a master’s degree for engineers who want to contribute to the prevention of crises around the world. It launches this fall.

battery charging

Entering the Fast Lane — MXene Electrodes Push Charging Rate Limits in Energy Storage

Can you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers in Drexel University’s College of Engineering can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design in the journal Nature Energy
The Ballistic Curtain Cordon System team.

The Drexel-Designed Device Aimed at Fixing an Epidemic

In an effort to limit the damage done by mass shootings, a team of Dragons drew on their military experience to design a bulletproof curtain that could help save lives. 
3D cell organelles

Drexel Researchers Help Provide First Glimpse at Organelles In Action

Researchers at Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development are getting a first glimpse at the inner-workings of live cells thanks to a new microscopy technique pioneered by Nobel laureate Eric Betzig with help from engineers at Drexel University. Their method uses grids of light that activate fluorescent color tags on each type of organelle — the result is a 3-D video that gives researchers their best look at how cells function. It will allow scientists to better understand how cells react to environmental stressors and respond to drug treatment. 
road cracks

A Recipe For Concrete That Can Withstand Road Salt Deterioration

Road salt, used in copious helpings each winter to protect them from ice and preserve safe driving conditions, is slowly degrading the concrete they’re made of. Engineers have known for some time that calcium chloride salt, commonly used as deicer, reacts with the calcium hydroxide in concrete to form a chemical byproduct that causes roadways to crumble. A civil engineer from Drexel University is working on a new recipe for concrete, using cast-off products from furnaces, that can hold its own against the forces of chemical erosion.
John Via

Employee Spotlight: John Via

The College of Engineering’s John Via occupies many roles at Drexel and even more positions within various philanthropic organizations — and just joined one that is headed by Queen Elizabeth II.
corn

People Aren't The Only Beneficiaries of Power Plant Carbon Standards

When the Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Clean Power Plan in 2015 it exercised its authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions to protect public welfare. The Plan, now the focus of escalating debate, also put the nation on course to meet its goals under the Paris Climate Agreement. Given that other pollutants are emitted from power plants—along with carbon dioxide—research has shown that carbon emission standards for the power sector benefit human health. New research released today shows that they would also benefit crops and trees.