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Science & Technology

Rendering of an x-ray baby with a brain inside

Treating Traumatic Brain Injury in Children 

A new study from the College of Medicine shows that a common antibiotic exacerbated cognitive problems in pediatric animal models. 

corn

People Aren't The Only Beneficiaries of Power Plant Carbon Standards

When the Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Clean Power Plan in 2015 it exercised its authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions to protect public welfare. The Plan, now the focus of escalating debate, also put the nation on course to meet its goals under the Paris Climate Agreement. Given that other pollutants are emitted from power plants—along with carbon dioxide—research has shown that carbon emission standards for the power sector benefit human health. New research released today shows that they would also benefit crops and trees.
A microscopic image of a tumor cell migrating through collagen.

The Way You Move: Tumor Cells Move Differently Than Normal Ones

A new study by a Drexel biology professor determined that tumor cells can’t move the same way that normal cells do to get through tight squeezes in the body, opening up the potential for future, targeted therapies.
The central corridor at the COP22 conference in Morocco.

Climate Change Conference COP22 Energizes Drexel Faculty, Students

A group of 10 students and professors went to Morocco in November for the annual gathering of government delegates and climate researchers. They came back refocused and reinvigorated.

a mixture of painted colors

Drexel Selected to Be Site in NEA’s First-Ever Funding of Arts Labs

For the first time, the National Endowment for the Arts is funding research labs, and Drexel’s Department of Arts Therapies was chosen to lead one focusing on arts and health.
An arm being given an immunization through a needle.

More are Positive About HPV Vaccine on Twitter Than Not, Drexel Study Finds

A Drexel University study into sentiments toward the HPV vaccine on Twitter found that significantly more tweets post positive sentiments toward vaccines, such as the value of prevention and protection, than not.
Drexel nanomaterials researchers in a South Korean lab.

Drexel's Materials Researchers Building Connections in Korea

The first chapter in a South Korean collaboration proved fruitful for Drexel's nanomaterials researchers, who learned that it takes big thinking to make progress on the smallest of scales.
Ultrasound Wound Healing Device

Healing Wounds With Ultrasound

Drexel researchers have received a $3 million NIH grant to test a new treatment for the millions of patients who suffer from slow-healing, chronic wounds.
climate change

Urban Climate Change Research Hub Opens at Drexel

In the battle to adapt to and mitigate climate change caused by humans, most environmental engineers and climate scientists agree that cities are the front line. Due to the sheer density of their population, and the quantity of resources they consume, cities have the potential to most quickly and significantly affect—and be affected by—climate risks. They also have the ability to integrate climate resiliency into their plans for the future, according to environmental engineering professor Franco Montalto, PhD, who will direct a network of North American climate change researchers concerting their efforts via a new hub at Drexel University. 
Bee, Flower

Philadelphia Public School Students Will Become Urban Scientists With New $1.17M NSF Grant
 

Four hundred local fourth, fifth and sixth grade students will have the opportunity to become urban scientists with resources made possible through a new, three-year $1.17 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

Wine on shelves at a grocery store.

After Privatization, Link Found Between New Liquor Establishments, Violence

A team led by a Drexel University professor found that areas of Seattle where new establishments with alcohol were added following Washington state’s privatization efforts saw a significant increase in violent assaults.
Fibroblasts

Sleeping Cells’ Survival Instincts: A Double-Edged Sword?

For researchers who study aging, a central riddle remains: If the human body has evolved to protect itself, why are cells unable to cope with the challenges associated with getting old?