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Science & Technology

Ashleigh Jugan lets a pangolin go.

Protecting the World’s Most Trafficked Animal While on Co-op

What’s a pangolin? And why is Ashleigh Jugan in Vietnam working to keep them safe from hunters? DrexelNow asked the fourth-year environmental sciences major about that and more in a Q&A about a highly unusual co-op. 
White-eared ground sparrow

Birds of All Feathers Work Together to Hunt When Army Ants March

When army ants move out, a new Drexel University study found that, instead of chasing each other away, birds work together to follow the column and hunt the insects that marching ants scare out of hiding.
The Ballistic Curtain Cordon System team.

The Drexel-Designed Device Aimed at Fixing an Epidemic

In an effort to limit the damage done by mass shootings, a team of Dragons drew on their military experience to design a bulletproof curtain that could help save lives. 
tech transfer

Milken Institute Ranks Drexel University in Top 20 for Tech Transfer

The Milken Institute, an independent economic think tank, recently released a ranking of schools based on their technology commercialization. Drexel University was ranked 46th out of 225 universities across the country.
Petri dish with yeast colonies that survived DNA breakage by Rad52-guided inverse RNA strand exchange (Credit: Georgia Tech)

Repairing Broken DNA

A College of Medicine study reveals an unexpected function of the homologous recombination protein Rad52 and may help to identify new therapeutic targets for cancer.
Gulf War

Searching for Clues to Treat Gulf War Illness

Scientists shed light on the neurological consequences of exposure to low-levels of nerve agents and suggest a drug that could treat some of the toxins’ neurological effects.
A woman walking on a sidewalk in front of a brick wall.

People Walking to Work or an Errand More Likely to Stroll into Dangerous Areas, Study Says

Pedestrians with a purpose, such as going to work or a store, were more likely to walk in areas with a higher risk of being hit by a car, compared to walkers on recreational strolls, a new study has found.
3D cell organelles

Drexel Researchers Help Provide First Glimpse at Organelles In Action

Researchers at Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development are getting a first glimpse at the inner-workings of live cells thanks to a new microscopy technique pioneered by Nobel laureate Eric Betzig with help from engineers at Drexel University. Their method uses grids of light that activate fluorescent color tags on each type of organelle — the result is a 3-D video that gives researchers their best look at how cells function. It will allow scientists to better understand how cells react to environmental stressors and respond to drug treatment. 
A fruit fly standing on an evergreen branch

Common Artificial Sweetener Likely a Safe, Effective Birth Control, Pesticide for Insects, Drexel Study Finds

Erythritol, a non-nutritive sweetener found in products like Truvia, has proven effective in killing fly larvae and slowing down their egg production, making it a good candidate for human and pet-safe pesticide use.
Paul Brandt-Rauf

Q&A With Paul W. Brandt-Rauf, Dean of the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems

The inaugural dean of the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems has only been on campus since February, but he’s already brimming with ideas to grow the school to have a bigger presence on campus and an even better reputation in its field. Paul W. Brandt-Rauf, MD, DrPH, ScD, the newest dean at Drexel, discussed all of these ideas and then some during a conversation with Drexel Quarterly in his new office.
Students attempt to negotiate a climate change agreement.

Drexel Students Try to Negotiate a Climate Change Accord

Three-dozen Drexel students role-played as global climate officials during a recent classroom exercise, working together to hash out a plan to address the changing environment. Over the course of nearly three hours of negotiations, they developed an agreement to reduce climate change and learned just how challenging such an endeavor can be. 
road cracks

A Recipe For Concrete That Can Withstand Road Salt Deterioration

Road salt, used in copious helpings each winter to protect them from ice and preserve safe driving conditions, is slowly degrading the concrete they’re made of. Engineers have known for some time that calcium chloride salt, commonly used as deicer, reacts with the calcium hydroxide in concrete to form a chemical byproduct that causes roadways to crumble. A civil engineer from Drexel University is working on a new recipe for concrete, using cast-off products from furnaces, that can hold its own against the forces of chemical erosion.