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Science & Technology

Marcellus Shale gas tower

Methane Levels Have Increased in Marcellus Shale Region Despite a Dip in Well Installation

Despite a slow down in the number of new natural gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region of Northeast Pennsylvania, new research led by Drexel University finds that atmospheric methane levels in the area are still increasing. Measurements of methane and other air pollutants taken three years apart in the rural areas of Pennsylvania that have been the target of natural gas development over the last decade, revealed a substantial increase from 2012 to 2015.
Vincent O'Leary on the Schuylkill River as part of the "Project Footpath" course.

In the Classroom and on the River Banks, Passing on a Love for Science

Vincent O’Leary is using his time at Drexel to get others interested in science, whether that means teaching elementary school students about physics or helping launch a class to explore urban ecology and environmental science.
Dalton George presents findings from the global climate change conference.

Climate Change Workshop Tackles Solutions to a Global Problem

The students and faculty who attended COP22 spoke to an audience eager for an update on the international efforts to address the damage humans are doing to the environment.

Yi Deng

Q&A With College of Computing & Informatics Dean Yi Deng

The College of Computing & Informatics has found a new leader in Dean Yi Deng, PhD. He’s only been on campus for a short while, but he’s brimming with ideas about how to grow the college and its impact on the University.
Students participate in a demonstration during last year's Philly Materials Day.

At Philly Materials Day, Drexel Aims to Inspire

The seventh annual event, set for Feb. 4 in the Bossone Research Enterprise Center, will offer visitors hands-on demonstrations and workshops to stimulate curiosity about materials science and engineering.
John Maeda, former president of the Rhode Island School of Design

Drexel’s Learning Innovation Program Launches With Speaker Series

The University’s new initiative aims to find the technologies and methods fueling creative approaches to education. It will feature a series of conversations on learning, a national survey of innovative spaces and pilot programs to put ideas into practice.
sink

Could Low-Flow Create High Risk? EPA Taps Drexel to Study Water Quality Impact of Conservation Practices

As public awareness of the need for water conservation, and new water-saving technology, have become increasingly effective at stemming excess water use, new questions are surfacing about how our plumbing, which was built to handle a regular flow of water, might now be a risk factor for bacterial and chemical contamination. In hopes of preventing future public health crises related to the systems that carry and treat our water, the Environmental Protection Agency is tasking a team of researchers, led by Drexel University, with a $2 million project to bring together existing and new experimental data on building plumbing—the stretch of pipes that takes water from main to tap—into a risk assessment tool that can guide new water use and safety regulations.  
cyber defense

Drexel Team Eyes Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition

Drexel University is preparing to field its first intercollegiate team in cybersecurity. A dozen students have been in training since the summer, coached by professionals from Susquehanna International Group, LLC, to ready themselves for the Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition—a national contest that pits students against hackers and a variety of digital dilemmas they might face in the cybersecurity field. Drexel and SIG are partnering to enter a team in the competition for the first time. 

Drexel Revives Interdisciplinary Research Conference, Set for April

The Emerging Graduate Scholars Conference will give students a chance to present their research, discover opportunities for collaboration and sharpen their skills for future national and international conferences.
Rendering of an x-ray baby with a brain inside

Treating Traumatic Brain Injury in Children 

A new study from the College of Medicine shows that a common antibiotic exacerbated cognitive problems in pediatric animal models. 

corn

People Aren't The Only Beneficiaries of Power Plant Carbon Standards

When the Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Clean Power Plan in 2015 it exercised its authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions to protect public welfare. The Plan, now the focus of escalating debate, also put the nation on course to meet its goals under the Paris Climate Agreement. Given that other pollutants are emitted from power plants—along with carbon dioxide—research has shown that carbon emission standards for the power sector benefit human health. New research released today shows that they would also benefit crops and trees.
A microscopic image of a tumor cell migrating through collagen.

The Way You Move: Tumor Cells Move Differently Than Normal Ones

A new study by a Drexel biology professor determined that tumor cells can’t move the same way that normal cells do to get through tight squeezes in the body, opening up the potential for future, targeted therapies.
The central corridor at the COP22 conference in Morocco.

Climate Change Conference COP22 Energizes Drexel Faculty, Students

A group of 10 students and professors went to Morocco in November for the annual gathering of government delegates and climate researchers. They came back refocused and reinvigorated.