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Faculty Experts

Michael Lowe, PhD

Professor, Department of Psycholgy

College of Arts and Sciences

Expertise:

psychology

nutrition

Contact:

michael.lowe@drexel.edu

215.553.7116

Lowe is a clinical psychologist who studies the psychobiology of eating and weight regulation, including dieting and preventing and treating obesity. His specific research areas include: the relationship between dieting, overeating and weight control; obesity and the prevention of weight gain and weight regain; eating disorders research; integrating biological and psychological perspectives on eating and weight regulation; and research on the "power of food." The “Power of Food Scale” assessment technique he developed and validated has been featured on “The Dr. Oz Show.”
Lowe has been a long-term consultant to Weight Watchers and to the Renfrew Center for eating disorders in Philadelphia. With co-investigators Dr. Meghan Butryn and Dr. Maria Coletta of Drexel, he is conducting a 5-year NIH-funded study focusing on improving the food environment to improve maintenance of weight loss.

For news media inquiries, contact Lauren Ingeno at lmi28@drexel.edu or 215.895.2614.

In the News

Related Articles

  • weight loss

    To Improve Self-Control, Call Weight Loss What It Is: Difficult

    Painting a realistic picture of the challenges of weight loss can lead to greater long-term outcomes, a new study from a Drexel psychologist shows.

  • scale with apple and measure

    Consistency May Be Key to Long-Term Weight Loss

    When it comes to losing weight, it’s not necessarily slow, but steady, that wins the race, according to new research from Drexel psychologists.

  • Have an Apple-Shaped Body? You May Be More Susceptible to Binge Eating

    Women with apple-shaped bodies – those who store more of their fat in their trunk and abdominal regions – may be at particular risk for the development of eating episodes during which they experience a sense of “loss of control,” according to a new study from Drexel University. The study also found that women with greater fat stores in their midsections reported being less satisfied with their bodies, which may contribute to loss-of-control eating.

  • Women with a tendency for excessive weight gain during development may be more susceptible to developing an eating disorder, Drexel research finds.

    Elevated Childhood Weight May Increase Risk of Eating Disorders

    A group of researchers at Drexel University suggest that actual elevations in body mass during childhood may play a much bigger role in the development of disordered eating than previously thought.

  • Past Weight Loss an Overlooked Factor in Disordered Eating

    Due to a complex and vicious cycle of biological and behavioral factors, dieters and weight loss researchers know, the more weight you’ve lost, the harder it is to keep it off. But eating disorder research has largely overlooked this influence, and Dr. Michael Lowe, a professor of psychology at Drexel University, has published a flurry of research studies showing that needs to change.

  • Do Women with Bulimia Have Both an Eating Disorder and a Weight Disorder?

    Researchers at Drexel University have found that a majority of women with bulimia nervosa reach their highest-ever body weight after developing their eating disorder, despite the fact that the development of the illness is characterized by significant weight loss.