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Faculty Experts

Brian Lee, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Research Fellow, A.J. Drexel Autism Institute

Dornsife School of Public Health

Contact:

brian.k.lee29@drexel.edu

267.359.6052

Lee's research interests include the epidemiology of neurological development, maintenance and decline.  Current topics include prenatal environmental exposures and autism risk; neighborhoods and psychosocial "stress" in the cognitive decline of older adults; lead toxicity and white matter health; gene-environment interaction; maternal antibody exposure in utero and fetal outcomes.

More information about Lee

For news media inquiries, contact Frank Otto at fmo26@drexel.edu or 215.571.4244.

In the News

Related Articles

  • A spilled bottle of multivitamins

    Multivitamin Use During Pregnancy Linked to Lower Risk of Autism With Intellectual Disability

    Taking a multivitamin during pregnancy was linked to a 30 percent decrease in risk of a child developing autism with an intellectual disorder, according to a new Drexel University study.

  • A pregnant woman in a blue dress holding her stomach.

    Antidepressant Use in Pregnant Women Linked to Small Increase in Autism

    Antidepressant use in pregnant women was linked to increased cases of autism in their children, though the trend actually appeared to be relatively small, effecting just 2 percent of children with diagnoses.

  • Students studying from binders at a table.

    Parental Depression Negatively Affects Children’s School Performance

    A study led by Drexel researchers found that parental depression was associated with diminished school performance in children.

  • Google search trends for the term "autism" from 2010 through 2014, showing peaks in searches in April of each year.

    Awareness Month Spurs Web Searches for Autism

    Autism Awareness Month each April brings blue lights and blue ribbons out to shine in many communities – but does it actually lead to increased autism awareness? According to a new analysis of web search trends by researchers at Drexel University, it does appear to drive an increase in Google searches for autism – by a third over searches in March in recent years.

  • Autism rates were about double in children born to mothers who took an SSRI during pregnancy, compared to children of mothers who didn't -- but overall rates were extremely low in both groups.

    In Utero Exposure to Antidepressants May Influence Autism Risk

    A new study from researchers at Drexel University adds evidence that using common antidepressant medications during pregnancy may contribute to a higher risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children, although this risk is still very small.

  • Generalized additive model estimates of probability of ASD by maternal and paternal age (years) in the Stockholm Youth Cohort. The 95% CIs are indicated by dashed lines. Based on Idring et al., International Journal of Epidemiology

    Child's Autism Risk Accelerates with Mother's Age Over 30

    A recent study from researchers from the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia and Karolinska Institute in Sweden provides more insight into how the higher risk of having a child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among older parents varies between mothers’ and fathers’ ages, and found that the risk of having a child with both ASD and intellectual disability is larger for older parents.

  • Dr. Brian K. Lee

    No Link Found Between Prenatal Exposure to Tobacco Smoke and Autism

    A large population-based study in Sweden indicates that there is no link between smoking during pregnancy and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children. The study, led by Dr. Brian Lee, an assistant professor at Drexel University and a team of international collaborators, will appear in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and was published online in December.