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Faculty Experts

Charles Haas

Charles Haas, PhD

Department Head, LD Betz Professor of Environmental Engineering; Director of Environmental Engineering Program

College of Engineering

Contact:

charles.nathan.haas@drexel.edu

215.895.2283

Haas is the head of Drexel's Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental engineering, his research interests include water treatment, risk assessment, bioterrorism, environmental modeling and statistics, microbiology, environmental health.

His research focuses on the treatment of drinking water. Specifically, Haas has studied the chemical disinfection processes, inactivation of emerging pathogens by disinfectants and the use of computational fluid dynamics for process modeling. Haas is also an expert in risk management and industrial waste treatment. A recipient of the 2003 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the International Ozone Association, Haas was listed among "Who's Who in the World" (2001) and was elected as fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

More information about Haas

For news media inquiries, contact Britt Faulstick at bef29@drexel.edu, 215.895.2617 (office) or 215.796.5161 (cell).

In the News

  • Tainted: How Navy Bases Contaminated Pa. Drinking Water

    Charles Haas, PhD, L.D. Betz Professor of Environmental Engineering and head of the Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a June 19 Philadelphia Inquirer story about chemical residue from the Navy base in Willow Grove might have contaminated drinking water in the area.

  • In Flint Water Crisis, The Biggest Problem to Fix May Be Trust

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz Professor of Environmental Engineering and head of the Department of Civil Architectural and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Feb. 2 Christian Science Monitor story about restoring water quality in Flint, Michigan. The story was also picked up by Yahoo! News.

  • Water: Exploring the State of Water in Flint and Philadelphia

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz Professor of Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, was a guest on WHYY-Radio (91-FM)’s “Radio Times” in a Jan. 27 segment about water quality in both Flint, Michigan and Philadelphia.

  • How Risky are Air Travel Germs?

    Charles Haas, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering and head of the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, was quoted in a Sept. 2 CBS News story about germs in air travel. 

  • Watered-Down Gen Ed for Engineers?

    Charles N. Haas, PhD, L. D. Betz Professor of Environmental Engineering and chair of civil, architectural and environmental engineering in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a June 26 Inside Higher Ed story on general education requirements for engineering students.

  • Questions Remain on Ebola Waste Disposal

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor in the College of Engineering, was mentioned in a Dec. 12 Voice of America story about research he’s undertaking with scientists at the University of Pittsburgh to study how long the Ebola virus can survive outside the body. 

  • Is 21 Days Long Enough For Ebola Quarantine?

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in Oct. 24 posts on FiveThirtyEight.com and The Fox & Friends blog about his study questioning the effectiveness of a 21-day quarantine for people who might have been exposed to the Ebola Virus. He was also mentioned in an Oct. 23 USA Today column about how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention handled the Ebola cases in the United States.

  • How did the 21-day watch list for Ebola symptoms come about?

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Oct. 21 Los Angeles Times story about his study that questions the effectiveness of a 21-day quarantine for individuals who might have been exposed to the Ebola virus.

  • Study: 21 Days Not A Long Enough Quarantine in Fight Against Ebola

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor in the College of Engineering, was interviewed in Oct. 17 news segments on FOX News’s “The Real Story With Gretchen Carlson,” and FOX Business’s “The Willis Report” and on Oct. 20 in a CNN “Newsroom” segment about the spread of the Ebola Virus. His study, questioning the 21-day quarantine for individuals who have been exposed to Ebola was also mentioned on CNN’s “New Day” on Oct. 20 and in stories on FOXNews.com and Huffington Post.

  • CDC: Ebola Patient May Have Been Ill As Early As Friday

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor in the College of Engineering, was interviewed in Oct. 16 news segments on CNN’s “AC360” and KYW-TV (CBS-3), and stories on Newsworks.org, Yahoo!Health and in the National Journal about the spread of the Ebola virus.

  • Study: People exposed to Ebola may need to be quarantined longer than 21 days

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in Oct. 16 stories in The Washington Post and International Business Times and posts on Forbes.com and the political blog Roll Call about his study that questions the World Health Organization’s recommended 21-day quarantine period for individuals who might have been exposed to the Ebola Virus.

  • A 21-Day Quarantine for Ebola May Not Be Enough, Study Says

    Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Oct. 15 post in VICE’s “Motherboard” blog about the 21-day quarantine for people who might have been exposed to the Ebola virus.

  • Train derails in downtown Lynchburg, leaving crude burning on James River

    Charles Haas, PhD, L.D. Betz chair professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an April 30 Washington Post story about a train derailment in Virginia that led to oil spilling into the James River.

  • Sewage flowed for more than 30 hours into Valley Creek in Valley Forge park

    Charles Haas, PhD, L.D. Betz Chair professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in Philadelphia Inquirer and Mainline Times stories on March 20 about the impact of a sewage leak in Valley Forge.

  • South Philly pilot program takes environmentally-friendly approach to cooking oil disposal

    Charles Haas, PhD, L.D. Betz Chair professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Feb. 20 WHYY/Newsworks.org story and interviewed on WHYY-Radio (91-FM)’s “The Pulse” about the environmental consequences of dumping used cooking oil down the drain.

  • All that road salt is hurting area waterways

    Charles Haas, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Feb. 17 WHYY/Newsworks.org story about the effects of excess road salt on area waterways.

  • GreenSpace: How Phila. officials keep the water clean and healthy

    Dr. Charles Haas, a professor in the College of Engineering and head of the department of civil, architectural & environmental engineering, was quoted in a July 7 Philadelphia Inquirer story about the Philadelphia Water Department’s testing practices.

  • Area water company gets research grant

    Drexel was mentioned as a research partner on a grant from WateReuse Research Foundation to study the risk of Legionella bacteria in water reclamation systems in an April 17 Philadelphia Business Journal story. Dr. Charles Haas, a professor in the College of Engineering, is the lead investigator for Drexel on the project.

  • Train Derailment and Chemical Spill in N.J.

    Dr. Charles Haas, a professor in the College of Engineering, was interviewed in a KYW-TV (CBS-3) “Eyewitness News at 5” story about the recovery efforts surrounding a train derailment and chemical spill in Paulsboro, N.J.

  • Slow Pace of Paulsboro Cleanup Frustrates Some Residents

    Dr. Charles Haas, a professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer article about Paulsboro residents’ discontent with the speed of the clean-up of vinyl chloride from a train derailment that occurred last Friday.

  • To Reduce Food Waste, City To Try Disposals

    Dr. Charles Haas, a professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in The Philadelphia Inquirer, in an article about the city of Philadelphia’s efforts to reduce food waste in landfills by installing home garbage disposals.

  • Nearly 400 Accidents with Dangerous Pathogens and Biotoxins Reported in U.S. Labs over 7 Years

    Scientific American mentioned Dr. Charles Haas, a professor and head of the civil, architectural and environmental engineering department in the College of Engineering, for his work on the National Research Council regarding accidents with dangerous pathogens and biotoxins.

Related Articles

  • ebola virus

    Collaborative Research Reveals Ebola Might Survive in Wastewater Longer Than Expected

    The historic outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa that began in March 2014 and has killed more than 11,000 people since has raised new questions about the resilience of the virus and tested scientists’ understanding of how to contain it. The latest discovery by a group of microbial risk-assessment and virology researchers suggests that the procedures for disposal of Ebola-contaminated liquid waste might underestimate the virus’ ability to survive in wastewater.

  • Pope Francis

    Drexel Experts Available to Comment on Pope's Visit to Philadelphia

    Pope Francis – and an estimated 1.5 million people – will descend upon the city of Philadelphia in late September as the capstone to the weeklong, international World Meeting of Families event, during which the Pope will deliver a public mass on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. From concerns about security measures to transportation, anxiety is already on the rise among Philadelphians regarding how the city will handle the influx of tourists expected to double the city’s population. Drexel University experts are available to comment on a range of issues related to the visit including safety, public health, environmental impact, infrastructure preparedness and tourism. Experts also are able to weigh in about what this once-in-a-lifetime event – and the Pope’s progressive views – mean for the Catholic church.

  • biosafety

    How Long Can Ebola Survive Outside the Body?

    Ebola is transmitted from person to person through bodily fluids, but Drexel researchers have found that there is not much information on how long the virus can live outside of the human body.

  • water research

    Drexel, NJIT and Rowan to Concert Water Research Efforts

    Researchers from Drexel University, the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rowan University are aligning themselves with government, private and advocacy groups in hopes of solving challenges that affect the region’s water resources. The research alliance, supported by scholars from all three academic institutions, will function as a data resource, a policy think tank and a lab for creating new technology.

  • North America: Ted Daeschler (second from right) with his team on Ellesmere Island.

    Spanning the Globe: Drexel Research Reaches Around the World in 2014

    Where in the world have Drexel professors conducted research in 2014? The answer: all seven continents.

  • 21-day quarantine for Ebola virus maybe not long enough

    Drexel Study Questions 21-Day Quarantine Period For Ebola

    As medical personnel and public health officials are responding to the first reported cases of Ebola Virus in the United States, many of the safety and treatment procedures for treating the virus and preventing its spread are being reexamined. One of the tenets for minimizing the risk of spreading the disease has been a 21-day quarantine period for individuals who might have been exposed to the virus. But a new study by Charles Haas, PhD, a professor in Drexel’s College of Engineering, suggests that 21 days might not be enough to completely prevent spread of the virus.

  • 3101 Market Drexel

    Institute for Energy and the Environment Seed Grants

    Reducing carbon emissions, improving efficiency of the power grid and using ultrasound to treat contaminated water are just a few of the research goals being pursued by the first round of projects funded by the A.J. Drexel Institute for Energy and the Environment. In all six projects received seed funding totaling $270,000 to investigate topics related to environmental protection and sustainability.

  • Drexel Engineering Receives Obama Singh grant

    An educational initiative, jointly funded by India and the United States, has paired Drexel University with the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi to create a resource for assessing the human health risks of microbial contamination.

  • Reverse-Osmosis filters

    Engineers Apply Water Monitoring System to Preserve Filtering Membrane

    Researchers in Drexel University’s Environmental Engineering Department are collaborating with American Water to apply a new test that is intended to extend the lifespan of seawater filtering membranes by predicting the growth of damaging biofilm on them. The test, called Bioluminescent Saltwater Assimilable Organic Carbon (AOC), will help to measure the amount of biodegradable organic matter in seawater and enable researchers to predict the level of biological fouling –formation of biofilm- that could occur on the filtering membrane. American Water developed the AOC test, which will also help to reduce Reverse-Osmosis (RO) membrane fouling in the water desalination process.