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Faculty Experts

Rachel Greenstadt

Rachel Greenstadt, PhD

Associate Professor, Computer Science

College of Computing & Informatics

Contact:

rachel.a.greenstadt@drexel.edu

215.895.2920

Greenstadt is the director of Drexel’s Privacy, Security and Automation Laboratory where she leads a team of computer scientists that design trustworthy intelligent systems – systems that act autonomously with integrity, so they can be trusted with important data and decisions. Her work incorporates theories of artificial intelligence, psychology, economics, data privacy and system security. One of the lab’s biggest projects is focused on using machine learning to understand textual communication, the tools her team has developed can determine the author of an anonymous piece of text or guide a writer in how to make their writing truly anonymous – without patterns. Greenstadt has been interviewed for stories in The New York Times, Boing Boing, The New Yorker, The New Scientist and The Philadelphia Inquirer about using linguistics to identify hackers, ways to protect your identity online, and the growing use of CAPTCHA for cybersecurity. She also commented in several stories about how her tool was used to determine that famed author of the “Harry Potter” series, J.K. Rowling, had penned a new book under a pseudonym.
 

More information about Greenstadt

Related from the Drexel News Blog

For news media inquiries, contact Britt Faulstick at bef29@drexel.edu, 215.895.2617 (office) or 215.796.5161 (cell).

 

In the News

  • Cheat Sheet: How to Become a Cybersecurity Pro

    Rachel Greenstadt, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Computing & Informatics, was quoted in a Sept. 22 TechRepublic story about pursuing a career in cybersecurity.

  • How this Drexel Program is Strengthening the Region’s STEM Pipeline

    Jeffrey Popyack, PhD, a professor in the College of Computing & Informatics, was quoted in an Aug. 24 Technically Philly post about Drexel’s REThink program, which places local teachers in Drexel research labs over the summer. Rachel Greenstadt, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Computing & Informatics, Santiago Ontanon, PhD, an associate professor in the college, and Mark Zarella, PhD, a research assistant professor in the College of Medicine, were also mentioned in the post.

  • Inside Philadelphia’s Growing Internet Privacy Community

    Rachel Greenstadt, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Computing & Informatics and director of the Privacy, Security and Automation Laboratory, was quoted in a July 8 Technically Philly post about Drexel hosting the international Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium last week.

  • Seven ways DARPA is trying to kill the password

    Research by Rachel Greenstadt, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Computing & Informatics and director of the Privacy, Security and Automation Laboratory, was mentioned in an Aug. 8 TechWorld.com post about seven DARPA-funded projects that are intended to improve internet security.

  • How I created a new digital identity—and you can too

    Rachel Greenstadt, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was mentioned in a March 4 Daily Dot post about her involvement with the anti-stylometry software Anonymouth, which she co-created with recent Drexel graduates.

  • A tool for anonymizing writing

    Dr. Rachel Greenstadt, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was featured in an August 5 Boston.com article about a software program they developed that can strip text of stylistic markers in order to obscure the identity of the author.

  • This Computer Program Turns Famous Writers Into Anonymous Hacks

    Dr. Rachel Greenstadt, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, graduate student Andrew W.E. McDonald and undergraduate Marc Barrowclift were featured in a July 31 New Republic story about a software program they developed that can strip text of stylistic markers in order to obscure the identity of the author. In the article, the group used its program, “Anonymouth,” to alter well-known texts by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Leo Tolstoy, Charles Dickens, David Foster Wallace, George Eliot and the King James Bible.

  • The Professor Who Declared, It's J.K. Rowling

    Dr. Rachel Greenstadt, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Chronicle of Higher Education article on July 29 about technology used to study linguistic style.

  • CAPTCHA: The Secret Behind Those Squiggly Computer Letters

    Dr. Rachel Greenstadt, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer story about CAPTCHA, difficult-to-visually-decipher security words that guard against spam on websites.

  • Software Helps Identify Anonymous Writers or Helps Them Stay That Way

    Research from Drexel’s Privacy, Security and Automation Lab in the College of Engineering was mentioned in a New York Times blog about stylometry software.

Related Articles

  • Brando

    The Upworthy Don: Formulas That Drive Google, Klout, Facebook Help Drexel Researchers Understand Organized Cybercrime

    Notorious gangsters Al Capone and Carlo Gambino were famously done in by tax evasion charges. John Gotti, the “Teflon Don” was given up by a confidant. While the criminal masterminds of today are conducting their nefarious business online, the key to taking them down depends on understanding how they organize and where to squeeze them. Researchers from Drexel University’s Privacy and Security Automation Lab are searching for that pressure point by studying the activity of cybercrime forums. Their findings could guide the next generation of “Untouchables.”

  • coding prints

    Computer Scientists Use Coding Style 'Fingerprint' Anonymous Programmers

    A team of computer scientists, led by researchers from Drexel University’s College of Computing & Informatics, have devised as way to lift the veil of anonymity protecting cybercriminals by turning their malicious code against them.