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Faculty Experts

Yury Gogotsi

Yury Gogotsi, PhD

Distinguished University and Bach Professor

College of Engineering

Gogotsi is the director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute and leads research in the Nanomaterials Research Group in the College of Engineering. He is a foremost expert on carbon-based nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanodiamonds, nanoporous carbons, carbon onions and carbides) and is pioneering the use of new materials, such as MXenes, for energy storage.

His work on materials for energy storage has been published in the top scientific journals (Science, Nature, Nature Materials, etc.) and he has commented in the media on stories related to batteries, renewable energy and energy storage. Gogotsi has been recognized with numerous national and international awards in his field including the 2014 Fred Kavli Distinguished Lectureship from the Materials Research Society, Ross Coffin Purdy award from the American Ceramic Society and the 2012 European Carbon Association Award. His name is included in the list of highly cited researchers published by Thomson-Reuters in 2014. 

More information about Gogotsi

Related from the Drexel News Blog

For news media inquiries, contact Britt Faulstick at bef29@drexel.edu, 215.895.2617 (office) or 215.796.5161 (cell).

In the News

  • Franklin Institute to Honor John Goodenough for Work on Battery Used in Cell Phones

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Nov. 7 Philadelphia Inquirer feature on John B. Goodenough, the pioneering researcher behind the lithium-ion battery, who is being honored by the Franklin Institute.

  • Nanodiamonds Reduce Short-Circuit Risk in Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Sept. 4 Chemical & Engineering News story about his research on using nanodiamonds to make lithium-ion batteries safer.

  • Nanodiamonds May Help Make Lithium-Ion Batteries Better and Safer

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Aug. 29 IEEE Spectrum “Nanoclast” blog post about his research on how to use nanodiamonds to make safer lithium-ion batteries.

  • Tiny Diamonds Can Prevent Fires in Mobile Phone Batteries

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Aug. 26 Canadian News Wire Service story about his research on using nanodiamonds to make lithium-ion batteries safer.

  • Study Shows Nanodiamonds Can Prevent Fires in Lithium Batteries

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted about his research on using nanodiamonds to prevent hazardous battery malfunctions in UPI and TechSpot stories on Aug. 25 and a Clean Technica story on Aug. 28.

  • Weekly Rewind: Battery Breakthroughs, Game-Changing EVs, Floating Solar Plants

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a July 28 stories on Yahoo! News (Canada) and MSN Money story about his research on new materials for electrodes that could allow batteries to charge faster.

  • Scientists are Creating a Cell Phone Battery That Charges Instantly

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a July 28 The Next Web story about his research to develop materials that could allow batteries to charge faster.

  • This Revolutionary Battery Material Charges Your Phone in Just Seconds

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was mentioned in a July 25 Mashable story about his research on using MXene to make electrodes that would enable batteries to charge more quickly.

  • Nanomaterial Charges Everyday Batteries in Seconds

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a July 22 Science Alert story about his research on MXene electrodes that could lead to faster charging batteries. A related story ran on Engadget and was picked up by MSN Money on July 24.

  • New Battery That Could Be Charged in Seconds Developed at Drexel University

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a July 19 Inc. story about his research on new designs for MXene electrodes that could allow for faster battery charging. A related story ran on July 11 in New Atlas.

  • Fast Charging Batteries, at Last!

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in July 13 Electronics 360 and Electronic Products stories about his recently published research on new designs for electrodes that could allow electronic devices to charge more quickly.

  • Drexel Engineers Claim Electrodes Made of MXene Allow Recharging in Minutes

     

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in July 13 Clean Technica story about his recently published research on new designs for electrodes that could allow electronic devices to charge more quickly.

  • Conductive Electrodes Key to Better Batteries

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in July 13 stories on New Electronics and Gas2 about his recently published research on new designs for electrodes that could allow electronic devices to charge more quickly.

  • ​In the Future, You'll Be Able to Charge Your Phone in Seconds

    Research on new designs for battery electrodes, by Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was featured in a July 11 Men’s Health story about their potential to shorten the charging time for electronic devices. The South Asian Times also covered the story.

  • 2D Material Could Make Pseudocapacitors Charge in Milliseconds

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in July 10 stories in IEEE SpectrumElectronics 360 and Inverse about his recently published research on new electrode designs that could allow batteries to charge faster.

  • 2-D Materials Go Beyond Graphene

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Charles T. and Ruth M. Bach Professor, and Michel Barsoum, PhD, Distinguished Professor, both from the College of Engineering, were featured in a May 29 Chemical & Engineering News story about the evolution of research in two-dimensional materials.

  • Should You Worry About Cellphone Radiation?

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an April 23 Mother Nature Network story that cited his development of MXene material for use as electromagnetic radiation shielding.

  • New UM System President is Details-Oriented, 'Born Leader'

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering, and Gary Friedman, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, were quoted in a Nov. 2 Missourian story about former Drexel professor Mun Choi, PhD, being named the new president of the University of Missouri System.

  • Composite Film Forms Ultra-Thin Electromagnetic Shield

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, was quoted in a Sept. 15 Chemistry World story about his group's work to test and develop the nanomaterial MXene for use in electromagnetic shielding.

  • 2D Nanomaterial MXene Outperforms Graphene In EMI Shielding

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, and Babak Anasori, PhD, a research assistant professor in the College of Engineering, were quoted in a Sept. 13 Med Device Online story about their research on using the nano material Mxene as electromagnetic interference shielding.

  • Should You Worry About Cellphone Radiation?

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was quoted in a Sept. 12 Mother Nature Network story about electromagnetic radiation and his work to develop a material that can help contain and shield it.

  • New Thing MXene Can Block Mobile Radiation

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was quoted in a Sept. 10 Cantech Letter story about his work with the Korea Institute of Science and Technology to test and develop the nanomaterial MXene for use as electromagnetic shielding in mobile devices. Related stories also ran in Gizmodo (U.K), Dispatch Weekly, Nature World News, Science World Report and Canada Journal, Babak Anasori, PhD, a research assistant professor in the College of Engineering was also quoted.

  • Micro-Supercapacitors Store Energy Directly Inside a Chip

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was mentioned in a Feb. 19 Gizmag story about his recently published research indicating that supercapacitors can be integrated into the architecture of a microchip. 

  • Tiny Micro-Supercapacitors Built Directly On a Chip

    Research by a team of international material scientists, including Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was featured in a Feb. 19 Ars Technica post. The team developed a way to integrate energy-storing supercapactiors onto the silicon wafers used to make microchips.

  • Supercapacitor On-a-Chip Now One Step Closer

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair Professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was quoted in a Feb. 11 IEEE Spectrum story on research he recently published in Science about the process of using carbon films to put energy storage devices on a microchip.

  • 26 Incredible Innovations that Improved the World in 2015

    Drexel's College of Engineering was mentioned in a Mashable.com article about the "most incredible innovations of the year" on Dec. 20 for being part of the team that created a super-absorbent material that can help to clean up oil spills.

  • Super-Absorbent Material Could be Used in Oil Spills

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and head of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was interviewed in a Dec. 2 WHYY-Radio (91-FM) story about his research to create a super-absorbent material that can help to clean up oil spills.

  • Knitted Supercapacitors to Power Smart Shirts

    Kristy Jost, a doctoral student in the College of Engineering; Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Trustee Chair and Distinguished professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute; and Drexel's Shima Seiki Haute Technology Lab were mentioned in a May 22 IEEE Spectrum story about their work to develop knitted textiles that can store energy. 

  • From Pottery Class To Next-Gen Lithium-Sulfur EV Batteries

    Research that’s seeking to develop a new material for use in lithium-sulfur batteries was featured in a March 19 post on CleanTechnica. College of Engineering researchers Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute; Michel Barsoum, PhD, Distinguished professor; post-doctoral researcher Meng-Qiang Zhao, PhD, and doctoral students Maria Lukatskaya, Michael Ghidiu, Boris Dyatkin, Olha Mashtalir, Darin Tallman, contributed to the research.

  • You Can Wear This New Steampunk “Energy Storage Textile,” Thanks To US Navy

    Capacitive yarn research being undertaken by Kristy Jost, a doctoral student in the College of Engineering; Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, and Genevieve Dion, an assistant professor in the Westphal College of Media Arts & Design and director of the Shima Seiki Haute Technology Laboratory, was featured in a March 20 CleanTechnica post.

  • For Energy Storage, MXene Materials Show Increasing Promise

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and Michel Barsoum, PhD, Distinguished professor in the College of Engineering, were mentioned in a Jan. 5 Chemical & Engineering News story about new properties of MXene materials they discovered.

  • Drexel University Lab Develops Next Generation Power Source

    Drexel research to develop conductive clay was featured in a Dec. 8 Metro story. Michael Ghidiu, a doctoral student at Drexel's College of Engineering, was quoted. Michel Barsoum, PhD, Distinguished professor in the College of Engineering, was mentioned in the piece and Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering, and Maria Lukatskaya, a doctoral student in the College of Engineering, were pictured.

  • At Drexel, Clay-Like Substance Could be Battery of Future

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering, and Michael Ghidiu and Maria Lukatskaya, doctoral students in the college, were quoted in a Dec. 4 Philadelphia Inquirer story about their research to develop conductive clay. Michel Barsoum, PhD, Distinguished professor in the College of Engineering, was also mentioned in the piece. 

  • Drexel University Creates a Lump of Clay that Conducts and Stores Electricity

    Conductive clay research by materials scientists in the College of Engineering was featured in Dec. 2 posts on Design News, Geek.com and Before It’s News. Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor; Michel Barsoum, PhD, Distinguished professor; Mengqiang Zhao, PhD, a post-doctoral researcher; and doctoral students Michael Ghidiu and Maria Lukatskaya, were mentioned and quoted in the posts. The team’s work will be published in the journal Nature on Dec. 4. 

  • New 'Clay' Could Help Remold Possibilities for Renewable Energy

    College of Engineering researchers Yury Gogotsi, PhD, distinguished university and trustee chair professor; Michel Barsoum, PhD, distinguished professor; Mengqiang Zhao, PhD, a post-doctoral researcher; and Michael Ghidiu and Maria Lukatskaya, doctoral students; were featured in stories about electrically conductive clay they created. The discovery was published in the journal Nature on Nov. 26 and reported in several news outlets including the Christian Science Monitor, NBCNews.com, FOXNEWS.com, National Science Foundation, Chemistry World and the Daily Mail.

  • Engineers Strengthen Atom-Thick Films for Next-Gen Tech

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, and Michel Barsoum, PhD, Distinguished Professor in the College of Engineering, were quoted in a Nov. 12 post on Tech Times about flexible nanocomposite material they created.

  • Lithium Ion Batteries Have Low Inherent Risk of Explosion

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, University and Trustee Chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, was interviewed in a story on WHYY-Radio (91-FM)’s “Newsworks Tonight” on July 2 about the risks of using lithium-ion batteries in laptops.

  • The Best Science and Engineering Visualizations of 2013

    Yury Gogotsi, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, Genevieve Dion, an assistant professor in the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design, Majid Beidaghi, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher in the College of Engineering, and doctoral students Kristy Jost and Babak Anasori were mentioned in Feb. 6 posts on Yahoo! News, Wired, FoxNews.com and several other websites, about the National Science Foundation International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge. The group took first place and also won the “People’s Choice” award for their entry “Wearable Power,” which shows a process they invented to knit a wearable energy storage device.

  • Photothermal effect of gold nanorod cluster disinfects biofilm

    Dr. MinJun Kim, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, and Wonjin Jo, a doctoral student in the College of Engineering, were mentioned in a July 4 Nanotechweb.org article about their research on the photothermal effect of gold nanorods on communities of bacterial cells.

  • MXenes - novel two-dimensional materials to improve battery technology

    Dr. Yury Gogotsi, a distinguished university and trustee chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, was quoted in an April 17 NanoWerk story about two-dimensional materials called “MXenes” that can be used to improve battery technology.

  • Flow electrodes may enable large-scale sea water desalination

    Dr. Yury Gogotsi, a distinguished university and trustee chair professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, was quoted in a ChemistryWorld on March 27 about using flow electrodes to desalinize water.

  • Nanomaterials for Energy Efficiency

    Dr. Yury Gogotsi, a professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, was featured in an InsideScience.org video about his research in using nanomaterials to make more efficient energy storage technology.

  • Drexel’s Energy Flow Capacitor: Is Grid-Level Electrical Storage Here Now?

    Dr. Yury Gogotsi, a professor in the College of Engineering and the director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, and Dr. E.C. Kumbur, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, were quoted in a Clean Technica blog post about their research in developing a new large-scale energy storage device.

  • Sparks Fly Over Graphene Energy Device

    Dr. Yury Gogotsi, a professor in the College of Engineering and director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, was quoted in a Nature.com blog entry about the viability of a new type of battery that researchers claim can generate an electric current by drawing ambient thermal energy from its surroundings.

  • New Power for Smart Garments

    ChemistryWorld quoted Dr. Yury Gogotsi, a professor and director of the A.J. Drexel Institute of Nanotechnology in the College of Engineering, in a story about new power for smart clothing garments.

  • New Conductive Glue Enhances Lithium Ion Battery Capacity by 30 Percent

    The Green Optimistic quoted Dr. Yury Gogotsi, a professor and director of the A.J. Drexel Institute of Nanotechnology in the College of Engineering, in a story about his work with lithium ion batteries.

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    Just Squeeze In — Drexel Researchers Discover When Spaces Are Tight, Nature Loosens Its Laws

    It turns out that when they’re in a hurry and space is limited, ions, like people, will find a way to cram in — even if that means defying nature’s norms. Recently published research from an international team of scientists, including Drexel University’s Yury Gogotsi, PhD, shows that the charged particles will actually forgo their “opposites attract” behavior, called Coulombic ordering, when confined in the tiny pores of a nanomaterial. This discovery could be a pivotal development for energy storage, water treatment and alternative energy production technologies, which all involve ions packing into nanoporous materials. 

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    Recipe for Safer Batteries — Just Add Diamonds

    While lithium-ion batteries, widely used in mobile devices from cell phones to laptops, have one of the longest lifespans of commercial batteries today, they also have been behind a number of recent meltdowns and fires due to short-circuiting in mobile devices. In hopes of preventing more of these hazardous malfunctions researchers at Drexel University have developed a recipe that can turn electrolyte solution — a key component of most batteries — into a safeguard against the chemical process that leads to battery-related disasters. 

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    Entering the Fast Lane — MXene Electrodes Push Charging Rate Limits in Energy Storage

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  • From left to right: Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs M. Brian Blake, PhD; Yury Gogotsi, PhD, the newly installed Charles T. and Ruth M. Bach Professor in the College of Engineering; and Giuseppe R. Palmese, PhD, interim dean and professor in the College of Engineering.

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    Containing Our 'Electromagnetic Pollution'

    If you’ve ever heard your engine rev through your radio while listening to an AM station in your car, or had your television make a buzzing sound when your cell phone is near it, then you’ve experienced electromagnetic interference. This phenomenon, caused by radio waves, can originate from anything that creates, carries or uses an electric current, including television and internet cables, and, of course cell phones and computers. A group of researchers at Drexel University and the Korea Institute of Science & Technology is working on cleaning up this electromagnetic pollution by containing the emissions with a thin coating of a nanomaterial called MXene.

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    Adding Some Salt to the Recipe For Energy Storage Materials

    A team of researchers from Drexel University, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) and Tsinghua University recently discovered a way to improve the recipe and make the resulting materials bigger and better and soaking up energy — the secret? Just add salt. 

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    The scientists whose job it is to test the limits of what nature—specifically chemistry— will allow to exist, just set up shop on some new real estate on the Periodic Table. Using a method they invented for joining disparate elemental layers into a stable material with uniform, predictable properties, Drexel University researchers are testing an array of new combinations that may vastly expand the options available to create faster, smaller, more efficient energy storage, advanced electronics and wear-resistant materials. 

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  • Gogotsi Questions Battery Efficiency Metrics

    Solving the mystery of prematurely dead cell phone and laptop batteries may prove to be a vital step toward creating a sustainable energy grid according to Drexel researcher Dr. Yury Gogotsi. In a piece published in the November 18 edition of  Science, Gogotsi, who is the head of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, calls for a new, standardized gauge of performance measurement for energy storage devices that are as small as those used in cell phones to as large as those used in the national energy grid.