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Faculty Experts

Theodore Corbin, MD

Theodore Corbin, MD

Associate Professor and Co-Director, Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice; Director of Healing Hurt People Program

College of Medicine and Dornsife School of Public Health

Contact:

Theodore.Corbin@drexelmed.edu

215.762.7368

Corbin, an emergency medicine physician, is an expert in trauma-informed hospital-based violence intervention. He leads the Healing Hurt People program, a prominent Drexel program that intervenes with victims of violent injury to provide case management and behavioral health services to help them transform their lives, preventing reinjury, retaliation and other negative outcomes. Healing Hurt People has been replicated in other hospitals in Chicago and Portland, Ore. Corbin is also a co-leader of the National Network of Hospital-Based Violence Intervention Programs.


More information about Corbin

For news media inquiries, contact Lauren Ingeno at lmi28@drexel.edu, 215.895.2614 (office) or 610.717.2777 (cell).

 

In the News

  • Drexel Center Gets Grant to Expand Health Peer Program

    John Rich, MD, professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, and Ted Corbin, MD, associate professor in the College of Medicine and Dornsife School of Public Health, were both featured in a Philadelphia Tribune story Nov. 15 on a grant their program, Healing Hurt People, secured. Kenneth Hardy, PhD, professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was also mentioned.

  • For Trauma Victims, Program Tries to Mend Emotional Injuries

    Ted Corbin, MD, an associate professor in the College of Medicine and the Dornsife School of Public Health, was interviewed in a Nov. 2 WCAU-TV (NBC-10) segment about how Healing Hurt People, the Drexel-based intervention program, is breaking the cycle of gun violence in Philadelphia. The story also featured Jermaine McCorey, a Healing Hurt People community health worker.

  • Drexel's 'Healing Hurt People' Program Helps Young Victims Recover From Emergency Room Tauma

    John Rich, MD, a professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health and director of the Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice, and Theodore Corbin, MD, an assistant professor in the College of Medicine, were quoted in a Feb. 17 Indianapolis Recorder story about Drexel's "Healing Hurt People" program.

  • Healing Hurt People Program Helps Young Victims Recover from Emergency Room Trauma

    Theodore Corbin, MD, an associate professor in the College of Medicine, and John Rich, MD, a professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, were quoted in a Feb. 5 story from the Urban News Service about Healing Hurt People, an intervention program at Drexel’s Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice. The story was picked up by the Seattle Medium, the San Diego Voice & Viewpoint and the Michigan Chronicle.

  • Hahnemann Expands Trauma Support Program to Philadelphia-Area Hospitals

    Ted Corbin, MD, an associate professor in the College of Medicine and School of Public Health, and John Rich, MD, a professor in the School of Public Health, were quoted in a WHYY-FM/Newsworks story on Feb. 21 about the planned citywide expansion of Healing Hurt People, the trauma-informed hospital-based violence intervention program which they run from Drexel’s Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice. The story also ran on NBCPhiladelphia.com on Feb. 23.

  • How Hospitals Can Help Stop the Cycle of Youth Violence

    A story in Pacific Standard on Jan. 29 featured research led by Jonathan Purtle, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, on the economic impact of hospital-based violence intervention programs. Drexel’s program, Healing Hurt People, which is based in the School of Public Health and College of Medicine, was also featured in the story.

  • The PTSD Crisis That’s Being Ignored: Americans Wounded in Their Own Neighborhoods

    Research from the Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice in the School of Public Health and College of Medicine on the impact of trauma on urban violence, and the Healing Hurt People intervention program, were discussed in a ProPublica article on Feb. 3. The story also appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer.

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