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Faculty Experts

Robert Brulle, PhD

Professor of Sociology and Environmental Science, Department of Culture and Communications

College of Arts and Sciences

Contact:

robert.joseph.brulle@drexel.edu

215.895.2294

Brulle has authored numerous articles and book chapters on environmental science, and is a frequent media commentator on climate change. Brulle co-edited "Power, Justice and the Environment: A Critical Appraisal of the Environmental Justice Movement" (2005) with David Pellow, and is the author of "Agency, Democracy, and Nature: U.S. Environmental Movements from a Critical Theory Perspective" (2000).

Brulle previously served as a commissioned officer in the United States Coast Guard for two decades. He received his doctorate in sociology from George Washington University, his master of science degree in natural resources from the University of Michigan, his master of arts degree in sociology from the New School for Social Research and his bachelor of science degree in marine engineering from the United States Coast Guard Academy.

For news media inquiries, contact Alex McKechnie at ahm62@drexel.edu, 215.895.2705 (office) or 401.651.7550 (cell).

 

In the News

Related Articles

  • Pope Francis made an evocative call to address the dual problems of environmental degradation and human exploitation. Photo credit: Alfredo Borba.

    Debating the Pope: Social Scientists Engage Pope's Call for Climate Change Dialogue in Top Journal

    In Pope Francis’ nearly 200-page climate change encyclical, Laudato SI, published earlier this year, he explicitly calls for a “dialogue with all people about our common home.” A group of leading social scientists provide a scholarly foundation for that dialogue in a special series of commentaries published online this week in Nature Climate Change.

  • New Book Argues that Social Sciences Are Critical to Climate Conversation

    According to the new book “Climate Change and Society: Sociological Perspectives,” engaging the social – and not just natural – sciences in the climate conversation is essential for effecting large-scale change. Edited by environmental sociologists Robert J. Brulle, PhD, a professor in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, and Riley E. Dunlap, a professor at Oklahoma State University, the book breaks new ground by presenting climate change as a thoroughly social phenomenon, embedded in behaviors, institutions and cultural practices.

  • Pope Francis

    Drexel Experts Available to Comment on Pope's Visit to Philadelphia

    Pope Francis – and an estimated 1.5 million people – will descend upon the city of Philadelphia in late September as the capstone to the weeklong, international World Meeting of Families event, during which the Pope will deliver a public mass on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. From concerns about security measures to transportation, anxiety is already on the rise among Philadelphians regarding how the city will handle the influx of tourists expected to double the city’s population. Drexel University experts are available to comment on a range of issues related to the visit including safety, public health, environmental impact, infrastructure preparedness and tourism. Experts also are able to weigh in about what this once-in-a-lifetime event – and the Pope’s progressive views – mean for the Catholic church.

  • Not Just the Koch Brothers: New Drexel Study Reveals Funders Behind the Climate Change Denial Effort

    A new study conducted by Drexel University environmental sociologist Robert J. Brulle, PhD, exposes the organizational underpinnings and funding behind the powerful climate change countermovement. This study marks the first peer-reviewed, comprehensive analysis ever conducted of the sources of funding that maintain the denial effort. Through an analysis of the financial structure of the organizations that constitute the core of the countermovement and their sources of monetary support, Brulle found that, while the largest and most consistent funders behind the countermovement are a number of well-known conservative foundations, the majority of donations are “dark money,” or concealed funding.