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Faculty Experts

Amy Auchincloss, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Dornsife School of Public Health

Contact:

amy.h.auchincloss@drexel.edu

267.359.6054

Auchincloss' research focuses on social and environmental determinants of chronic health conditions. Her work has examined restaurant nutritional labeling and its impact on healthier food choices; spatial risk factors within residential environments that influence health behaviors related to obesity and type 2 diabetes; the application of novel complex systems modeling that can be used to examine spatial and socio-economic patterning of health behaviors/outcomes; air pollution epidemiology including the contribution of atmospheric conditions (temperature and barometric pressure) and vehicular traffic to air pollution in relation to cardiovascular-related endpoints.

More information about Auchincloss

For news media inquiries, contact Frank Otto at fmo26@drexel.edu or at 215.571.4244.

In the News

  • Smoking: A Pediatric Disease

    A study by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, associate professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, on how raising cigarette prices by a dollar can reduce smoking in older people by 20 percent, was referenced in a Spectrum (Cedar City, Utah) story Nov. 8.

  • Study: Raising the Price of Cigarettes by $1 Could Help Smokers Quit

    Research by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an associate professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, which looked into how raising cigarette prices by a dollar can affect smoking rates, was featured in an Aug. 20 story in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and in Aug. 21 stories in the Deccan Chronicle (Indian English-language paper), the Daily Star and The Sun.

  • Smokers More Likely to Quit When Cigarette Prices Increase

    Research by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an associate professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, that looked into how raising cigarette prices by a dollar can cut into smoking, was picked up on Aug. 18 by UPI and Business Standard, on Aug. 19 in Philly Voice, and on Aug. 21 by Politico New York, NewsMax Health and Money-ish.

  • More Places to Buy Booze Means More Violence in Neighborhoods

    A study from researchers in the Dornsife School of Public Health was profiled in a Jan. 27 Fast Company story. The study, led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an associate professor in the school, looked into the correlation between places where alcohol can be purchased and violence levels in Philadelphia.

  • More Often, Calorie Counts are on the Menu

    Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an associate professor in the School of Public Health, was quoted in an Orlando Sentinel article on April 8 about restaurants posting calorie counts on their menus. The article was also picked up by Bloomberg Business.

  • Why Bike Lanes and Soda Bans Actually Work

    Stephanie Mayne, a doctoral student in the School of Public Health, and Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an associate professor in the School of Public Health, were quoted in a Men’s Journal article on April 2 about their research on which policy and built environment interventions may affect obesity.

  • Trying to lose weight? Drexel researchers review the best way cities can help

    Stephanie Mayne, a doctoral student in the School of Public Health, was interviewed for a story on WHYY-FM/Newsworks.org on March 25 about research she led reviewing which types of policy and built environment changes have an impact on obesity. Amy Auchincloss, PhD, and Yvonne Michael, ScD, associate professors in the School of Public Health, co-authored the study.

  • Why the Fast-Food Ban Failed in South L.A.

    An article in The Atlantic on March 24 mentioned a study of public policy and built environment changes that can affect obesity, led by School of Public Health doctoral student Stephanie Mayne, with Amy Aunchincloss, PhD, and Yvonne Michael, ScD, associate professors in the School of Public Health. The article was also syndicated on Yahoo! News.

  • Bikes lanes or soda bans? Study reveals which public policies really fight obesity

    Research from the School of Public Health about the impact of policy and built environment changes on population-level obesity, led by doctoral student Stephanie Mayne with Amy Auchincloss, PhD, and Yvonne Michael, ScD, both associate professors in the School of Public Health, was featured in a story on RawStory.com on March 22.

  • Menu Calorie Counts: ‘Personal Responsibility’ or Public Health Measure?

    A study led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, about the effect of menu labeling laws on public health, was mentioned in a Civil Eats article on Dec. 17.

  • Walking, biking and taking public transportation tied to lower weight

    Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, was quoted in a Reuters story about a study showing that commuting by walking, biking or public transit is associated with lower weight. It was syndicated to numerous national outlets including FOXNews.com.

  • Should We Charge More For Coveted Parking Spaces?

    Research on the cost of parking in cities led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, was discussed in an article on FastCompany’s Co.Exist site on July 25.

  • Parking meter rates may be driving more people to the CTA

    An article on the Chicago Sun-Times “Voices” blog on May 15 featured research on the cost of parking in cities led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health.

  • An App For Selling Access To A Street Parking Space You Do Not Own

    Research led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, was cited in a FastCompany story on May 14 about controlling parking costs in cities.

  • How We Think About Parking Spaces Is Ruining Our Cities

    Research led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, on the cost of parking in cities, was featured in a Fast Company article on April 22.

  • 3 Enormous Benefits to Charging the Right Price for Parking

    Research led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, was featured in an article in The Atlantic Cities on April 2 about the price of parking.

  • ObamaCare menu mandate creates headache for restaurants

    Research led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, was cited in a FoxNews.com story and FOX Business segment on Feb. 25.

  • Save Over 1,000 Calories With These 5 Simple Portion Swaps

    Research led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, about the nutritional value of meals in full-service restaurants, was mentioned in a Jan. 21 Huffington Post article.

  • When It Comes To Nutrition, Chain Restaurant Meals Still Leave A Lot To Be Desired

    Research led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, about the nutritional value of restaurant meals, was featured in stories in the Huffington Post, Philadelphia Metro, PhillyMag.com and the Daily Mail on Jan. 9 and Jan. 10.

  • Eating out: Fast food vs restaurants

    Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, was interviewed on WABC-TV (New York) in a story on Jan. 8 about her study showing that restaurant meals typically have values of saturated fat, calories and sodium as high as the recommended limits for an entire day. The study was also covered by TIME and Everyday Health.

  • Sodium in 1 restaurant meal tops recommended daily intake

    Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, was quoted in a CBC (Canada) online story on Jan. 8 about her research on the nutritional value of meals in restaurants. The story was picked up by outlets including Yahoo! and MSN, and was also covered by numerous CBS and ABC radio stations including WCBS and WINS (New York), WTOP (Washington, D.C.) and WBBM (Chicago). The news syndicate HealthDay also ran a brief about the study.

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