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Events Calendar

  • Community Lawyering Clinic

    Friday, November 24, 2017

    12:00 AM-12:00 AM

    The Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships 3509 Spring Garden Street Philadelphia, PA 19104

    • Everyone

    Drexel’s Kline School of Law provides a number of services to address community-wide needs in two settings. First, the Community Lawyering Clinic takes on a wide range of legal issues of community interest during the law school's regular semesters. Cases and projects have focused on issues like employment discrimination, homeownership "tangled title," tax foreclosure, post-conviction relief, and equity in utility billing. In addition, the pro bono clinics provide local residents with legal assistance free of charge, focusing mainly on estate planning (wills, medical directives, and powers of attorney) and criminal record expungement in cooperation with Philadelphia Lawyers for Social Equity. See below to see what clinics and events they will be holding this month:

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  • Startup Interaction Program

    Friday, November 24, 2017

    12:00 AM-12:00 AM

    Interested? Email SIPdrexel@gmail.com

    • Undergraduate Students
    • Graduate Students
    • Senior Class
    • International Students
    • LGBTQA Community

    Are you looking for an opportunity to experience startup culture firsthand? A way to experience the Baiada Institute's unique culture and be a part of a company during its crucial growth stage? Well, the Startup Interaction Program (SIP for short) offers you this and much more! SIP is a comprehensive quarter long opportunity to work with Drexel's top startups and gain crucial work experience for your co-ops and beyond! For more information or in case you are interested, send an email to sipdrexel@gmail.com. We look forward to hearing from you!

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  • Wild Wizarding Weekend

    Friday, November 24, 2017

    10:00 AM-5:00 PM

    The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway Philadelphia, PA 19103

    • Everyone

    Explore the magical world of the Academy with a weekend of spellbinding, hands-on activities! Meet the Academy’s own fantastic beasts and learn about the real animals that inspire your favorite wizarding stories.

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  • Wild Wizarding Weekend

    Saturday, November 25, 2017

    10:00 AM-5:00 PM

    The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway Philadelphia, PA 19103

    • Everyone

    Explore the magical world of the Academy with a weekend of spellbinding, hands-on activities! Meet the Academy’s own fantastic beasts and learn about the real animals that inspire your favorite wizarding stories.

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  • Wild Wizarding Weekend

    Sunday, November 26, 2017

    10:00 AM-5:00 PM

    The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway Philadelphia, PA 19103

    • Everyone

    Explore the magical world of the Academy with a weekend of spellbinding, hands-on activities! Meet the Academy’s own fantastic beasts and learn about the real animals that inspire your favorite wizarding stories.

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  • Mitochondria Malate-Aspartate and Lactate Shuttle Mechanisms Cooperate in Coupling of Glycolysis

    Monday, November 27, 2017

    10:00 AM-12:00 PM

    Bossone Research Center, Room 302, located at 32nd and Market Streets.

    • Undergraduate Students
    • Graduate Students
    • Faculty
    • Staff

    BIOMED Master's Thesis Defense

    Title:
    Mitochondria Malate-Aspartate and Lactate Shuttle Mechanisms Cooperate in Coupling of Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation in Colon Cancer

    Speaker:
    Oya Altinok, MS Candidate, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems

    Advisors:
    Zulfiya Orynbayeva, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Drexel University

    Adrian Shieh, PhD, Associate Teaching Professor, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University

    Abstract:
    The requirement for metabolic efficiency forces cancer cells to generate sufficient energy equivalents to support their high proliferative activity. One cycle of glycolysis supplies cells with two molecules of ATP only, while oxidative phosphorylation provides around 36 molecules of ATP. Therefore, many cancer types, including colon cancer, reprogram their metabolism to accelerate mitochondria processes to fulfill the elevated energy demands. However, the long known signature of cancer is elevated glycolysis according to the classical work of Otto Warburg, while little is known about the processes underlying this effect. Yet, there is a growing number of studies showing that mitochondria remain highly active across cancers even under glycolytic conditions.

    In attempt to understand this discrepancy, this work is aimed in exploring the mechanisms that could couple glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to enable aerobic oxidation of glucose by mitochondria. The oxidation of glycolytic lactate in mitochondria with involvement of LDH has been shown in heart, skeletal muscles and neurons, i.e. highly energetic tissues. It would be reasonable to speculate that cancer cells adapt similar mechanisms to support their elevated energetic status.

    We studied the activities of mitochondria malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS), consisting of glutamate-aspartate (Aralar/Citrin) and malate-α-ketoglutarate transporters, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) which is supposedly localized in mitochondria inter-membrane space. We demonstrated that cooperation of these shuttles is required in generating of respiratory substrate NADH in mitochondria matrix which otherwise is membrane impermeable. It is proposed that MAS supplies NAD+ to mitochondria LDH to convert glycolytic lactate to pyruvate which then enters matrix and gets involved in NADH generation for oxidative phosphorylation.

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  • Helms Academy

    Monday, November 27, 2017

    10:00 AM-3:00 PM

    The Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships 3509 Spring Garden Street Philadelphia, PA 19104

    • Everyone

    Goodwill Industries in partnership with Community College of Philadelphia provide a zero-cost community-based educational opportunity for adults over 18 to attain their high school equivalency credentials and up to 30 college credits, right at the Dornsife Center. Meeting students where they are, dedicated staff members provide the extensive support services needed to help participants complete the program and create their own strategy for personal success. For more information call (215) 571-4011 or stop by room C201 at the Dornsife Center.

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  • 2018 Benefit Highlights

    Monday, November 27, 2017

    11:00 AM-12:00 PM

    Hill Conference Room LeBow Engineering Center Room 240 31st & Market Streets Philadelphia, PA

    • Faculty
    • Staff

    Human Resources is hosting "2018 Benefit Highlights" sessions. Join us to learn more about your short and long-term disability plan options, medical plan options - including the High Deductible Health Plan, Health Savings Accounts, and other benefit topics.

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  • KEYSPOT

    Monday, November 27, 2017

    12:00 PM-5:00 PM

    The Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships 3509 Spring Garden Street Philadelphia, PA 19104

    • Everyone

    KEYSPOT is a free computer lab offering assistance with job search, career development, technology training, & adult education programs. Please note: KEYSPOT will be closed at 5:00 pm on Tuesday, December 5. The lab will also be closed from Friday, December 22, 2017 to January 1, 2018.

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  • Geometry, Growth, and Shape of the Normative Pediatric Thoracic and Lumbar Spines and Rib Cage

    Monday, November 27, 2017

    1:00 PM-3:00 PM

    Bossone Research Center, Room 709, located at 32nd and Market Streets.

    • Undergraduate Students
    • Graduate Students
    • Faculty
    • Staff

    BIOMED PhD Thesis Defense

    Title:
    Geometry, Growth, and Shape of the Normative Pediatric Thoracic and Lumbar Spines and Rib Cage and Comparisons with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Speaker:
    James Peters, PhD Candidate, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems

    Advisor:
    Sriram Balasubramanian, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems

    Abstract:
    Previous studies of pediatric vertebrae and rib morphology use varying measurement techniques to collect geometric dimensions from nonhomogeneous samples and few of these studies evaluate growth or possible vertebral level and sex-related differences in the pediatric morphology. Detailed morphology data on the pediatric vertebra and ribs may provide insights into the progression of spinal deformities like adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). AIS is a complex three-dimensional (3D) deformity of the thoracic and lumbar spines and rib cage. Classification schemes like the Lenke system have been developed to help categorize scoliotic deformities and provide guidance for surgical interventions, and Lenke-types 1, 2, and 5 represent approximately 83 percent of cases requiring surgery.  The standard surgical treatment for AIS is posterior spinal fusion (PSF) ; however more recent techniques rely on growth modulation and require knowledge about how mechanical forces impact development of the spine. Such investigations can be conducted using finite element (FE) models and while previous FE models of the spine have simulated growth of the vertebral bodies, growth of the posterior elements (pedicles, facets, and major processes) is largely ignored due to a lack of data describing their development.

    In this thesis, pediatric vertebrae and rib morphology data were collected from 3D reconstructions of 202 skeletally normal subjects between the ages of 1 and 19 years. This normative data was compared with that of 36 Lenke-type 1, 2, and 5 subjects to quantitatively assess the deformity in each and evaluate vertebral remodeling following PSF. Finally the pediatric growth data was integrated into a growing FE model and used to assess the impact of vertebral growth on a simulated PSF construct.

    Growth of the vertebra and ribs was found to vary across vertebral levels; however, few differences between sexes were observed for the vertebral bodies and pedicles. Remodeling of the vertebrae following PSF was found for Lenke-type types 1, 2, and 5 suggesting continued growth for the structures after surgery. Finally growth of the posterior vertebral elements was determined to have a significant effect on the stresses induced in the simulated PSF construct.

    In addition to improving FE models of the growing spine, the normative and Lenke-type-specific morphology data presented here can be used to optimize the timing and duration of growth modulating devices and develop novel techniques for the treatment of AIS.

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