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Writer Archives

Frank Otto

Staff Writer
Frank Otto is a staff writer in the University Communications Department who serves as the editor of DrexelNow. He began at Drexel in December 2014. 

Previously, Frank served as a reporter for The Mercury in Pottstown, Pa. for three years. His duties included covering several school districts and municipalities as well as reporting on spot news and features. He also interviewed Carly Rae Jepsen once.

Contact:

fmo26@drexel.edu

215.571.4244

Cover photo for the National Autism Indicators Report 2017: Developmental Disability Services and Outcomes in Adulthood

27 Percent of Adults with Autism Who Use State Disability Services Have No Work or Other Activities: National Autism Indicators Report 2017

In its latest annual report, the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute examined a survey of adults who use developmental disability services and found that a significant number with autism are not engaged in work or day activities outside the home.
A fruit fly standing on an evergreen branch

Common Artificial Sweetener Likely a Safe, Effective Birth Control, Pesticide for Insects, Drexel Study Finds

Erythritol, a non-nutritive sweetener found in products like Truvia, has proven effective in killing fly larvae and slowing down their egg production, making it a good candidate for human and pet-safe pesticide use.
Aerial view of West Philadelphia

Urban Health Collaborative Develops New Health Profile of West Philadelphia Promise Zone

Examining data from a variety of sources to create a picture of health factors in the Promise Zone, the Urban Health Collaborative seeks to put information in the hands of those able to use it to work toward improving the neighborhoods’ health.
Kitchen with black countertops, sink, oven, microwave and refrigerator.

Most Home Kitchens in Philadelphia Study Would Earn Severe Code Violations

A pair of studies found that most of the home kitchens in Philadelphia that they examined would get critical code violations if they were judged by the same standards that we hold to the restaurants where we eat.
The top of a soda can

Purse Strings, Not Heart Strings: Revenue Emphasis Helped Philly ‘Soda Tax’ Pass Instead of Health Argument

In a behind-the-scenes look at how policymakers formed Philadelphia’s sugar-sweetened beverage tax, researchers from Drexel University found that an emphasis on revenue generation for pre-kindergarten education, not health benefits, served as a winning strategy.
A dyed green image of a fibers in a human hippocampus

Treatment Window for Fragile X Likely Doesn’t Close After Childhood, Drexel Study Finds

A Drexel University-led study looked into human and rat brain samples and found that the biological structures potentially contributing to Fragile X syndrome are present in adult brains — something that mouse samples did not show.
Mark Sabaj and his daughter Sofia holding fish

Eyeless Catfish Named for Discoverer’s Daughter

To honor his young, science-minded daughter, a researcher from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University named a new species of blind, Amazonian catfish after her.
A pair of firefighters in full gear walking away toward a firetruck.

Better Injury Data Management Can Save Fire Departments Hundreds of Thousands of Dollars

A new study out of Drexel University shows that more accurately tracking injuries in the fire service can save fire departments a great amount of money and more accurately focus injury prevention efforts.
A doctor's white coat with pens that include a drug company's name.

Two-Thirds of Americans See Docs Who Got Paid by Drug Companies: Study

A new study led by Drexel University found that a majority of Americans visited doctors in the past year who had been paid or given gifts by pharmaceutical or medical device companies — but very few patients knew about it.
Jerry Fagiano sitting at a table with his elbow on it as he speaks during a panel.

Drexel Hosting Discussions on the Health Dangers of Rolling Back Environmental and Climate Policies

Drexel’s Dornsife School of Public Health will hold a discussion and host a leading expert to talk about the human health effects that could result from potential rollbacks on climate and environment policy in the United States.
A child playing with a toy at a daycare.

More Day Cares Near By, More Germs? Maybe Not, According to Drexel Whooping Cough Study

A team of Drexel University researchers looking into how a higher density of day care facilities may affect the prevalence of illness in a neighborhood and found that it doesn’t really have much of an effect.
View of the Micromyzon orinoco specimen from above.

Almost 4 Decades Later, Mini Eyeless Catfish Gets a Name

Discovered in a 1978–79 expedition, a pale, eyeless catfish that doesn’t even measure an inch long is now known as Micromyzon orinoco, for the South American river in which it was discovered.