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New Summer Philosophy Courses

May 6, 2013 — Students looking to add new courses to their summer schedules can explore the philosophy of sport, science, literature and “queer theory” in these exciting courses!


PHILOSOPHY OF SPORT (PHIL 210.001)

The games and sports we play and watch reflect, shape, and even alter the social world around us. In this class, students will examine the issues that emerge when thinking about sports philosophically. Discussions will include questions like: What does it mean that so many of us are fans of professional and major collegiate sports? Are there important differences between that which we call “sports” and that which we call “games”? What is the proper role of sportsmanship in a competitive sport environment? And are there ways of thinking about performance-enhancing drugs that avoid the reductionist arguments heard so often in press accounts?

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Bryan Sacks, is open to all students above the sophomore level and will meet Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 9:00 AM to 9:50 AM. Interested sophomores should contact Dr. Peter Amato to request waiver of class restriction. Location TBD.


PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (PHIL 361.001)

What do Aristotle, Galileo, and Stephen Hawking all have in common that makes them scientists? Is economics a science in the same way physics is? If you must run an experiment in order for something to be a science, are anthropology and mathematics sciences? Pluto was a planet and now it is not—so, how can science “change its mind” so quickly? In this course, students will examine natural scientific theory construction and investigative scientific methods from a philosophical standpoint, considering issues such as the nature and scope of experimental methods and the history and justification of theory change.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Dr. Stacey Ake, is open to all students above the sophomore level who have taken PHIL101. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:30 PM to 1:50 PM. Interested students who have not taken PHIL101 should contact Dr. Peter Amato to request waiver of prerequisite. Location TBD.


PHILOSOPHY IN LITERATURE (PHIL 381.001)

In this class, students will explore philosophical topics such as the nature of the human self, desire, knowledge, and reality. Participants will explore what violence does to those who become the objects of violence, those who act as the instruments of violence, and those who witness it. The primary course readings will be Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian, Angela Carter’s The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman, Stephen Wright’s Going Native, and Lucy Corin’s Everyday Psychokillers. These novels will be supplemented by the writings of various philosophers including Theodor Adorno, Georges Bataille, Max Horkheimer, Alexandre Koyré, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Simon Weil.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Dr. Eric Fleming, is open to all students above the sophomore level and will meet Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 3:00 PM to 3:50 PM. Location TBD.


QUEER THEORY (PHIL 481.001 meets with WMST 308.001)

This course will attempt to theorize the meaning of “queer” (and, in turn its counterparts, ”normal” and “straight”), and articulate what “queer theory” is/does. Course participants will examine major attempts to challenge the concept of “normal” and explicate the meaning and use of the concept “queer.”

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Dr. David Fryer, is open to students above the pre-junior level and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:00 AM to 12:20 PM. Location TBD.

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