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Jana Mossey, PhD, MPH, MSN

Professor
Epidemiology and Biostatistics
267.359.6216
jm55@drexel.edu
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Degrees

BA, Religion-Political Science, Mount Holyoke College; BS, Nursing, Columbia University School of Nursing; MSN, Adult Mental Health Nursing, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing; MPH, PhD, Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Jana M. Mossey received her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College, her M.P.H. and Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina and her MSN in psychiatric nursing from the University of Pennsylvania. She worked as a public health nurse with Spanish-speaking immigrants in New York City before pursuing her graduate studies in epidemiology.

Prior to joining the faculty of the Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1986, she held faculty positions at the University of Manitoba in Canada and Temple University in Philadelphia. While at these universities, she developed several important research initiatives related to the psychosocial health of older individuals. Her initial studies of the relationship of self-rated health and mortality in older Manitobans produced the seminal paper on this topic, "The Manitoba longitudinal study on aging: description and methods," Mossey et al., Gerontologist (1981), that has stimulated many national and international studies and has provided the focus for the work of many other researchers. Likewise, her groundbreaking study of the psychosocial determinants of recovery from hip fracture, a study conducted in Philadelphia, has provided the basis for the work of a substantial number of other researchers.

Having received her MSN in Psychiatric Nursing in 1993, her research has focused more directly on mental health issues that affect both elderly and younger populations. Her clinical trial of a treatment program for sub-threshold depression in the elderly has provided the scientific basis for the implementation of comparable treatment programs with older individuals who suffer such levels of depression. Dr. Mossey has taught public health and epidemiology courses in schools of public health, medicine, and nursing. She was a member of the "founding committee" of the Drexel University School of Public Health. She currently is engaged in teaching and research within the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and chairs the School of Public Health Appointment, Promotion, and Tenure Committees. Her current research includes studies of the meaning of self-rated health among elders, the relationship and consequences of pain and mood, and the factors affecting the quality of life of elders. Most recently she has been the Principal Investigator of two studies funded by the National Institute of Aging and served on the scientific advisory committee for the American Academy of Pain Medicine's Uniform Outcomes Measures Project.

Currently Dr. Mossey is involved in studies related to the incidence, risk factors for, and consequences of pain, depression, and poor self-rated health in community dwelling individuals over age 18. As well, she is a member of the editorial board of the journals Pain Medicine and Behavioral Medicine, and contributes to the epidemiology of aging initiative within the Gerontological Society of America.

Research Interests

  • Mental Health
  • Aging
  • Social and Psychiatric

Publications

Ambroggio, L, Lorch, SA, Mohamad, Z, Mossey, J Shah, SS..Congenital anomalies and resource utilization in neonates infected with herpes simplex virus. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. In Press 2009.

Rosso AL. Gallagher RM. Luborsky M. Mossey JM. Depression and self-rated health are proximal predictors of episodes of sustained change in pain in independently living, community dwelling elders. [Journal Article] Pain Medicine. 9(8):1035-49, 2008 Nov.

Moss MS. Hoffman CJ. Mossey J. Rovine M. Changes over 4 years in health, quality Of life, mental health, and valuation of life. Journal of Aging & Health. 19(6):1025-44; 2007 Dec.