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New Winter Courses

September 25, 2014

 

History


ST: Post-Soviet Russia (HIST 298.001)
This new course addresses changes in Russian politics, culture and the economy after 1985, including the transition from authoritarian, state-control to democratic, market dynamics. Topics include: science, technology and medicine; organized crime, education, the balance of government censorship and protest movements; and how these are represented in recent film, music and literature.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Lloyd Ackert, PhD, is open to all students above freshman level, and will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 11 – 11:50 a.m. Location TBD.

ST: The Making of Modern India (HIST 298.002)
The world’s largest democracy, nuclear superpower, emergent economic powerhouse, “Jewel of the British Empire,” and ancient civilization: these are among the various ways to understand India. This survey course is designed to familiarize students with the rich and complex history of British colonialism in India, the legacy of Mahatma Gandhi and the overthrow of British rule, and religious violence and conflict that went into the making of modern India.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Debjani Bhattacharyya, PhD, is open to all students above freshman level, and will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 – 10:50 a.m. Location TBD.

ST: History of Witchcraft (HIST 298.003)
Europe and its colonies saw a wave of witchcraft persecutions from the 1400s to the 1700s. This course investigates this famous episode using historians' works and original trial documents. What sparked this trend? What stopped it? How did the pursuit of witches vary from place to place? What do these stories tell us about changing ideas about justice, religion, gender or science?

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Jonathan Seitz, PhD, is open to all students above freshman level, and will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 12:30 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: History of Biomedicine (HIST 298.004)
This course will survey the intellectual and social-cultural history of Western medicine from the 18th century to the present.  It will focus on the political, economic, institutional, and cultural aspects of the development of scientific medicine. Interpretive materials will include biographies, medical publications, films, and fictional accounts related to topics including the role of physicians, nurses, hospitals, biomedical research, therapies etc.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Lloyd Ackert, PhD, is open to all students above freshman level, and will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 1 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: Global History of Engineering (HIST 298.005)
This course examines the development of the profession of engineering since the 18th century. It will focus on the different approaches to engineering and engineering professionalism in several countries and empires from across the world, paying attention to their distinctive technological styles, ideologies and roles in industrialization and state building.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Jonson Miller, PhD, is open to all students above freshman level, and will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 12 – 12:50 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: History of Commodities (HIST 298.006)
This course explores the history of commodities through the lenses of environmental history and the history of science and technology. It looks at commodities as building blocks of modernity connecting disparate regions of the globe and highlighting unexpected entangled geographies: oranges connect California with South Africa and Israel; uranium connects Manhattan project sites in New Mexico with Belgian Congo; wheat connects the Great Plains with the emergence of Chicago's future markets in the 19th century, or Mexico with India in the Green Revolution years. This course delves into the painstaking work undertaken by scientists and engineers in making commodities into things that circulate across scales. Environmental factors will also be taken into account as enabling or hindering commodities' circulation.

This will be a very experimental and hands-on course: after two introductory sessions, students will choose their favorite commodity and study its historical trajectory and significance, focusing on its scientific, technological and environmental dimensions. Besides an original written essay, students are expected to participate in two workshops to discuss their work in progress.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Tiago Saraiva, PhD, is open to all students above freshman level, and will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 3 – 3:50 p.m. Location TBD.


Philosophy


The Philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard (PHIL 380.001)
This course introduces students the philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, one of the most important thinkers and writers of the 19th century. Regarded as among the first Existentialist philosophers, Kierkegaard wrote works of great psychological, theological and philosophical subtlety that have left an indelible mark on modern thought, culture and writing.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Marilyn Foley-Piety, PhD, is open to all students above the sophomore level and meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30 – 4:50 p.m. For more information, contact the instructor at mp34@drexel.edu.


Political Science


ST: Politics of Disability (PSCI 480.001)
This course is an upper-level survey of disability studies, with a focus on how disability intersects with other categories of difference, how politics and social advocacy have shaped the history of disability, and the impact of disabilities-related legislation.

This 4.0 credit course, taught by Chloe Silverman, PhD, is open to all students above the freshman level, and will meet Wednesdays and Fridays, 12 1:50 p.m. Location TBD.


Psychology


Sleep and Its Disorders (PSY 480.001)
The course will cover a variety of topics on the importance of sleep throughout one’s lifespan (including a special focus on sleep during the college years), sleep disorders and their consequences, sleep's contribution to physical and mental wellbeing, as well as sleep therapies and treatments. If you snooze you lose...so sign up soon!

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Jacqueline Kloss, PhD, is open to all students above the freshman level and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD.


Science, Techology and Society


Science and Technology Policy (SCTS 571.001) 
This graduate seminar examines the relationship between science and technology policy and democracy. Students will tackle basic questions about the degree to which science and technology policies have advanced or compromised core goals of a democratic society, including economic prosperity, public health, environmental justice, and political equality more generally.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Gwen Ottinger, PhD, is open to students above the sophomore level and graduate students who have contacted STS for permission, and will meet Tuesdays, 6:30 - 9:20 p.m. Location TBD.